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Bear Goes to Town epub download

by Anthony Browne


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Bear Goes to Town book. Bear takes a walk in town and uses his magic pencil to rescue his.

The little bear book by anthony browne.

by. Browne, Anthony, 1946-. Bear takes a walk in town and uses his magic pencil to rescue his new animal friends from an evil man in black. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by DeannaFlegal on August 10, 2009.

Anthony Edward Tudor Browne (born 11 September 1946, in Sheffield) is a British writer and illustrator of children's books, primarily picture books, with fifty titles to his name. From 2009 to 2011 he was Children's Laureate.

AUTHOR: Browne, Anthony. TITLE: Bear Goes to Town. Place of Publication. Acceptable - Very well read. May have significant wear and tear and contain notes & highlighting. Read full description. See details and exclusions.

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Big Brown Bear went to get his mail while waiting for his oatmeal to cool. Armchair Interviews says: Children will enjoy Big Brown Bear Goes to Town. The story is sweet and thoughtful and the illustrations are colorful and inviting. He noticed that it had rained during the night. He was happy that his mailbox kept his mail dry. But he noticed that Rat's car filled up with water when it rained, so he emptied it out for him. Rat appreciated Big Brown Bear's thoughtfulness and told him how much trouble it was to bail out the water every time it rained. Unfortunately Rat didn't have anyplace to put his car to keep it dry. Big Brown Bear came up with a wonderful idea.

Explore our range of cheap books by Anthony Browne. He was awarded the Hans Christian Andersen Award in 2000 for services to children’s literature (the first British author to win it since 1956) and was Children’s Laureate between 2009 and 2011.

Anthony browne coming to a town near yo. .lt;p

Bear Goes to Town epub download

ISBN13: 978-0241108178

ISBN: 0241108179

Author: Anthony Browne

Category: Young Adult and teen

Language: English

Publisher: Penguin Uk (June 1, 1999)

Pages: 32 pages

ePUB size: 1690 kb

FB2 size: 1427 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 982

Other Formats: lit lrf rtf docx

Related to Bear Goes to Town ePub books

Broadraven
Having read previous reviewers' take on this book left me... not disappointed, but underwhelmed, I suppose. I didn't purchase this book with the specific hope of disturbing myself along with my 2-year-old and 4-year-old, but I was intrigued by the possibility. I do specifically endeavor to expose my children to creepy/scary stories along with all the wholesome classics to keep their childhoods interesting. That being said, I am also culturally Jewish, so I anticipated the WWII/Gestapo references to jump out at me.

Instead, I would personally say Nazis in any manner as a theme of this book are a bit of a stretch. It never would have crossed my mind had I not read about it in reviews, and I actually am heavily analytical with literature, even when it's just for my kids. For example, I dislike Rainbow Fish and use it as a cautionary tale - why on Earth does the rainbow fish literally have to dismember himself to gain the approval of those around him? Yes, sharing and charity are important, but that fish was literally shunned into hanging out pieces of its own body like candy just to appease others.

Yep, I'm THAT person... and yet I saw nothing untoward about this book, or anything that would keep me from reading it to my kids. It's essentially a continuation of Bear's travels with his magical pencil that can create items (and life, I suppose) out of thin air. Bear uses this tool to help out others and overcome his own obstacles as presented.

SPOILERS AHEAD (although, does this matter with picture books?) w/ 4-year-old's reactions

When walking along, Bear gets a bit trampled by some people who do not see him. 4-Y/O: "Oh no! They stepped on Bear!"

Bear meets Cat, who after asking him about the pencil tells Bear to draw him some food. 4-Y/O: "That was rude. Panda (from Please, Mr. Panda) would have said no."

Bear complies, Cat says thank you. 4-Y/O: "That was nicer."

Bear and cat walk past a creepy butcher shop. 4-Y/O: "I think that butcher is a miscreant." ("Why?") "He looks mean and like he wants to eat Bear and Cat."

Bear and Cat walk past a bear shop with a stranger hiding in the shadows. 4-Y/O: "Oh no! Who is that?"

Cat gets abducted. 4-Y/O: "Oh no, poor Cat!"

Bear draws roller skates to follow the cat. 4-Y/O: "I need to get some roller skates."

Bear finds Cat trapped with other animals. 4-Y/O: "Who are these other animals?" ("I don't know, it looks like they were taken, too.") "Maybe the butcher took them."

A sheep declines the rescue, and the other animals travel through Bear's drawn escape. 4-Y/O: "Why did the sheep stay?" ("Maybe the sheep was there too long and got too used to being a prisoner.")

The bad people give chase to Bear and friends. Bear draws some items to delay their pursuit. 4-Y/O: "Good job, Bear!"

They escape. They arrive in the middle of nowhere. The animals don't know what to do, so Bear draws them a nice home. 4-Y/O: "What is he drawing?" ("It looks like a meadow so they can live in a nice place.") "That's so kind of Bear."

So, yeah... not a particularly traumatizing event. I realize that all kids react differently, so if you have concerns I would skim through this book at the library or preview an online version so you can make your own judgement. It truly is an adorable book that introduces some advanced concepts (Stockholm Syndrome, for one) in a nonchalant manner that allows kids to individually decide if they want to discuss it further. Definitely glad this one is in our home library now.
Broadraven
Having read previous reviewers' take on this book left me... not disappointed, but underwhelmed, I suppose. I didn't purchase this book with the specific hope of disturbing myself along with my 2-year-old and 4-year-old, but I was intrigued by the possibility. I do specifically endeavor to expose my children to creepy/scary stories along with all the wholesome classics to keep their childhoods interesting. That being said, I am also culturally Jewish, so I anticipated the WWII/Gestapo references to jump out at me.

Instead, I would personally say Nazis in any manner as a theme of this book are a bit of a stretch. It never would have crossed my mind had I not read about it in reviews, and I actually am heavily analytical with literature, even when it's just for my kids. For example, I dislike Rainbow Fish and use it as a cautionary tale - why on Earth does the rainbow fish literally have to dismember himself to gain the approval of those around him? Yes, sharing and charity are important, but that fish was literally shunned into hanging out pieces of its own body like candy just to appease others.

Yep, I'm THAT person... and yet I saw nothing untoward about this book, or anything that would keep me from reading it to my kids. It's essentially a continuation of Bear's travels with his magical pencil that can create items (and life, I suppose) out of thin air. Bear uses this tool to help out others and overcome his own obstacles as presented.

SPOILERS AHEAD (although, does this matter with picture books?) w/ 4-year-old's reactions

When walking along, Bear gets a bit trampled by some people who do not see him. 4-Y/O: "Oh no! They stepped on Bear!"

Bear meets Cat, who after asking him about the pencil tells Bear to draw him some food. 4-Y/O: "That was rude. Panda (from Please, Mr. Panda) would have said no."

Bear complies, Cat says thank you. 4-Y/O: "That was nicer."

Bear and cat walk past a creepy butcher shop. 4-Y/O: "I think that butcher is a miscreant." ("Why?") "He looks mean and like he wants to eat Bear and Cat."

Bear and Cat walk past a bear shop with a stranger hiding in the shadows. 4-Y/O: "Oh no! Who is that?"

Cat gets abducted. 4-Y/O: "Oh no, poor Cat!"

Bear draws roller skates to follow the cat. 4-Y/O: "I need to get some roller skates."

Bear finds Cat trapped with other animals. 4-Y/O: "Who are these other animals?" ("I don't know, it looks like they were taken, too.") "Maybe the butcher took them."

A sheep declines the rescue, and the other animals travel through Bear's drawn escape. 4-Y/O: "Why did the sheep stay?" ("Maybe the sheep was there too long and got too used to being a prisoner.")

The bad people give chase to Bear and friends. Bear draws some items to delay their pursuit. 4-Y/O: "Good job, Bear!"

They escape. They arrive in the middle of nowhere. The animals don't know what to do, so Bear draws them a nice home. 4-Y/O: "What is he drawing?" ("It looks like a meadow so they can live in a nice place.") "That's so kind of Bear."

So, yeah... not a particularly traumatizing event. I realize that all kids react differently, so if you have concerns I would skim through this book at the library or preview an online version so you can make your own judgement. It truly is an adorable book that introduces some advanced concepts (Stockholm Syndrome, for one) in a nonchalant manner that allows kids to individually decide if they want to discuss it further. Definitely glad this one is in our home library now.
Wild Python
My 5 and 3 year olds didn't seem to be too troubled by this book, but I found it dark and disturbing. What starts out as a seemingly typical children's story takes a sudden and scary turn. I have to think that the only reason they weren't more scared is that they are too young to know anything about World War II and the death camps. But even without that metaphor, the illustrations are disturbing in themselves. Skulls, razor wire, dark figures... it's just not what I consider appropriate for a children's book. The "magic pencil" story could easily have been told with less threatening villians and more age-appropriate illustrations. I found myself searching the book's dust jacket for why on earth the author would choose to create a book like this for young children.
Wild Python
My 5 and 3 year olds didn't seem to be too troubled by this book, but I found it dark and disturbing. What starts out as a seemingly typical children's story takes a sudden and scary turn. I have to think that the only reason they weren't more scared is that they are too young to know anything about World War II and the death camps. But even without that metaphor, the illustrations are disturbing in themselves. Skulls, razor wire, dark figures... it's just not what I consider appropriate for a children's book. The "magic pencil" story could easily have been told with less threatening villians and more age-appropriate illustrations. I found myself searching the book's dust jacket for why on earth the author would choose to create a book like this for young children.
Zorve
In our nursery for 3 & 4 year olds we aim to provide a safe and nurturing environment. While it may be good to stimulate conversations about fears and worries, I feel this book may introduce fears that most children this age dont have.

I had this book in our collection for over a year and had never realised what the story or illustrations were like inside. The cover gives the impression of a friendly story. When I set about sorting our books I opened the book at the illustration of the "facility" that instantly made me think concentration camp and the gas chamber. Ok 3 year olds won't make that association but the dark gestapo type figures with their eyes covered by their caps would be menacing to any age of reader.

Removed from our picture book collection after discusing with other staff.
Zorve
In our nursery for 3 & 4 year olds we aim to provide a safe and nurturing environment. While it may be good to stimulate conversations about fears and worries, I feel this book may introduce fears that most children this age dont have.

I had this book in our collection for over a year and had never realised what the story or illustrations were like inside. The cover gives the impression of a friendly story. When I set about sorting our books I opened the book at the illustration of the "facility" that instantly made me think concentration camp and the gas chamber. Ok 3 year olds won't make that association but the dark gestapo type figures with their eyes covered by their caps would be menacing to any age of reader.

Removed from our picture book collection after discusing with other staff.
Xig
Funny, my son and I liked it. Bear goes to town with a magic pencil, makes friends with Cat, saves cat and a variety of other animals from a guarded camp (Animal Control? funny place to find cows, though), and draws an idyllic hillside for these animals to occupy. The illustrations are quirky and unexpected, while the tone of the book is calm, almost somnabulistic. It does seem to have an underlying theme about harm to animals, but it is deeply placed, and my child was much more concerned with the clear "good and evil" parameters he's familiar with from fairy tales.
Xig
Funny, my son and I liked it. Bear goes to town with a magic pencil, makes friends with Cat, saves cat and a variety of other animals from a guarded camp (Animal Control? funny place to find cows, though), and draws an idyllic hillside for these animals to occupy. The illustrations are quirky and unexpected, while the tone of the book is calm, almost somnabulistic. It does seem to have an underlying theme about harm to animals, but it is deeply placed, and my child was much more concerned with the clear "good and evil" parameters he's familiar with from fairy tales.
Cae
This book just traumatized my 2 year old and I found it really disturbing too. Human ear, shoe and eyeballs in the butchers shop window and the face screaming stop is blood curdling. It was that picture that terrified my daughter. And because the bear draws pictures that become real it was impossible to tell her it was "just a picture". Not impressed. Wish I'd read it through first before reading it together.
Cae
This book just traumatized my 2 year old and I found it really disturbing too. Human ear, shoe and eyeballs in the butchers shop window and the face screaming stop is blood curdling. It was that picture that terrified my daughter. And because the bear draws pictures that become real it was impossible to tell her it was "just a picture". Not impressed. Wish I'd read it through first before reading it together.
Balladolbine
I must have read this book a hundred times, though only a couple times in the past 18 years. The book and I went on a journey; from only being able to absorb the pictures and trying to memorize the story to pouring over every word once they began to make sense.

The book terrified me and intrigued me in equal measure. The image of the guard's fillings and tonsils and the faces I discovered in the hanging meat at the butchers!, the weirdness and the heroism of the disconcerted Bear all pulled me in. I'm sure a lot of my appreciation for the book stemmed from my mother's amusement whilst reading it to me. The book intrigued her just as much as it fascinated me. I would ask so many questions; 'Why?', 'Is that fair?'. I was also desperate to work out the reason behind her wry smile, so kept it out in order to decode it when I was old enough.

It stayed with me and is the only childrens' book I've kept on the shelf at my mother's. Reading it in hindsight, I completely understand some parents' reservations - it is dark and nonsensical, sinister in parts, a little like a wolf in lamb's clothing, but that's all the magic, it left me not just wanting to read, but to understand. Great book!
Balladolbine
I must have read this book a hundred times, though only a couple times in the past 18 years. The book and I went on a journey; from only being able to absorb the pictures and trying to memorize the story to pouring over every word once they began to make sense.

The book terrified me and intrigued me in equal measure. The image of the guard's fillings and tonsils and the faces I discovered in the hanging meat at the butchers!, the weirdness and the heroism of the disconcerted Bear all pulled me in. I'm sure a lot of my appreciation for the book stemmed from my mother's amusement whilst reading it to me. The book intrigued her just as much as it fascinated me. I would ask so many questions; 'Why?', 'Is that fair?'. I was also desperate to work out the reason behind her wry smile, so kept it out in order to decode it when I was old enough.

It stayed with me and is the only childrens' book I've kept on the shelf at my mother's. Reading it in hindsight, I completely understand some parents' reservations - it is dark and nonsensical, sinister in parts, a little like a wolf in lamb's clothing, but that's all the magic, it left me not just wanting to read, but to understand. Great book!