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The Not-So-Great Depression epub download

by Amy Goldman Koss


The Not-So-Great Depression book.

The Not-So-Great Depression book. Acclaimed author Amy Goldman Koss delivers a warm hearted and timely tale about the things we lose and the insights A TIMELY, WARMHEARTED NOVEL ABOUT LIFE IN HARD ECONOMIC TIMES. Jacki's ninth–grade teacher is always going on about the unemployment index and the recession, but nothing sinks in until her mom is laid off and everything seems to cost more than they can afford.

The not-so-great depression Although Koss interjects a recounting of forcible eviction and a visit to a. .

The not-so-great depression. In Which the Economy Crashes, My Mom Goes Broke, My Sister’s Plans Are Ruined, My Dad Grows Vegetables, and I Do Not Get a Hamster. Although Koss interjects a recounting of forcible eviction and a visit to a homeless shelter and the topic is current and serious, she keeps the tone generally optimistic and reassuring. In the end, readers get a problem novel with little depth, but it delivers a cast of charming characters and a semi-happy ending.

Ships from and sold by MadisonTateShoppe. Chock-full of economic principles, The Not-So-Great Depression helps middle-grade readers better understand the causes of the recent financial crisis and some of the outcomes for families experiencing job loss. Because the story is cloaked in humor, innocence, and teen-age angst, it will draw and entertain readers who would otherwise avoid a novel about economic recession like the plague.

The Not-So-Great Depression - Amy Goldman Koss. Chapter 1. Dragons and bees

The Not-So-Great Depression - Amy Goldman Koss. Dragons and bees. Saying how great he was for not killing the bees, but moving them, queen and all, to a safe place to pollinate the world’s fruits and vegetables, and save the world from hunger and famine. All in a day’s work, ma’am, he sai. lthough maybe not in those exact words. Then Carly, laying her fake rooklyn accent on thick, told him she was my nanny.

Acclaimed author Amy Goldman Koss delivers a warm hearted and timely tale about the things we lose and the insights we gain. Books related to The Not-So-Great Depression. You are in the United States store. Joe Sherlock, Kid Detective, Case The Haunted Toolshed.

in the Teachers Store. The Not-So-Great Depression. Other Books You Might Like. 6-8. GUIDED READING LEXILE® MEASURE Grade Level Equivalent DRA LEVEL.

Praise for The Not-So-Great Depression. AMY GOLDMAN KOSS is the author of several acclaimed teen novels, including POISON IVY and SIDE EFFECTS. She lives in Glendale, CA. Amy Goldman Koss. Koss's timely novel manages to tackle difficult topics with sympathy, humor, and a lot of heart. Koss's story is timely and lively. It also provides some realistic ways to make the best of tough times.

The author of the acclaimed "Poison Ivy" and "Side Effects" delivers a timely, warmhearted novel about life in hard economic times.

Select Format: Paperback. The author of the acclaimed "Poison Ivy" and "Side Effects" delivers a timely, warmhearted novel about life in hard economic times. ISBN13: 9781596436138. 2010) A novel by Amy Goldman Koss. Acclaimed author Amy Goldman Koss delivers a warm hearted and timely tale about the things we lose and the insights we gain. Jacki's ninth-grade teacher is always going on about the unemployment index and the recession, but nothing sinks in until her mom is laid off and everything seems to cost more than they can afford. Similar books by other authors.

Amy Goldman Koss chooses to write this novel from Jacki’s perspective and does so with ease. It takes a little while to adjust to reading teen but when you do, it adds much more life to the book than any other style of narration could.

A TIMELY, WARMHEARTED NOVEL ABOUT LIFE IN HARD ECONOMIC TIMES.Jacki’s ninth–grade teacher is always going on about the unemployment index and the recession, but nothing sinks in until her mom is laid off and everything seems to cost more than they can afford. Acclaimed author Amy Goldman Koss delivers a warm hearted and timely tale about the things we lose and the insights we gain.

The Not-So-Great Depression epub download

ISBN13: 978-1596436138

ISBN: 1596436131

Author: Amy Goldman Koss

Category: Young Adult and teen

Subcategory: Literature & Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Roaring Brook Press (May 11, 2010)

Pages: 272 pages

ePUB size: 1649 kb

FB2 size: 1999 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 853

Other Formats: docx mbr rtf doc

Related to The Not-So-Great Depression ePub books

Deeroman
Sensitive account of an affluent family who learn to adjust to a fall in their financial circumstances. Characters are beautifully well-drawn. Worlds above and beyond the usual YA fare.
Deeroman
Sensitive account of an affluent family who learn to adjust to a fall in their financial circumstances. Characters are beautifully well-drawn. Worlds above and beyond the usual YA fare.
Mbon
Wife loved it - daughter got to read it too.

Well written, humorous throughout and an interesting look at real life!

I'll definitely read it after my daughter has finished the book!
Mbon
Wife loved it - daughter got to read it too.

Well written, humorous throughout and an interesting look at real life!

I'll definitely read it after my daughter has finished the book!
Realistic
My daughter had to read this book for her religion class. She read it out loud to me and I really enjoyed it!
There are some good lessons to learn. I would recommend families reading this together.
Realistic
My daughter had to read this book for her religion class. She read it out loud to me and I really enjoyed it!
There are some good lessons to learn. I would recommend families reading this together.
Gindian
Great book.
Gindian
Great book.
Ichalote
Up until the day when their mother lost her high-powered job, Jacki and her siblings had enjoyed a pampered lifestyle: private schools; a fancy car; a large house with a pool in a posh neighborhood; restaurant and takeout meals; a housekeeper, gardener, and driver; and an abundance of clothing, gadgets, and toys. All these perks slowly started to unravel as it became increasingly clear that Mom's various job interviews were not translating into a job offer, the value of their financial investments would continue to tank, and opportunities for loans were drying up faster than the weather.

As an eternal optimist, Jacki typically saw the brighter side of her family's regular progression to economize. She had always hated those piano lessons, switching to public school meant that maybe she could go to school with cute Adam B., and new household rules for home-cooked meals seemed to be revealing cooking skills she never knew she had. But even her positive attitude could not diminish the tensions in her household or the hardships that people she knew were experiencing as a result of the great recession.

Chock-full of economic principles, The Not-So-Great Depression helps middle-grade readers better understand the causes of the recent financial crisis and some of the outcomes for families experiencing job loss. Because the story is cloaked in humor, innocence, and teen-age angst, it will draw and entertain readers who would otherwise avoid a novel about economic recession like the plague.
Ichalote
Up until the day when their mother lost her high-powered job, Jacki and her siblings had enjoyed a pampered lifestyle: private schools; a fancy car; a large house with a pool in a posh neighborhood; restaurant and takeout meals; a housekeeper, gardener, and driver; and an abundance of clothing, gadgets, and toys. All these perks slowly started to unravel as it became increasingly clear that Mom's various job interviews were not translating into a job offer, the value of their financial investments would continue to tank, and opportunities for loans were drying up faster than the weather.

As an eternal optimist, Jacki typically saw the brighter side of her family's regular progression to economize. She had always hated those piano lessons, switching to public school meant that maybe she could go to school with cute Adam B., and new household rules for home-cooked meals seemed to be revealing cooking skills she never knew she had. But even her positive attitude could not diminish the tensions in her household or the hardships that people she knew were experiencing as a result of the great recession.

Chock-full of economic principles, The Not-So-Great Depression helps middle-grade readers better understand the causes of the recent financial crisis and some of the outcomes for families experiencing job loss. Because the story is cloaked in humor, innocence, and teen-age angst, it will draw and entertain readers who would otherwise avoid a novel about economic recession like the plague.
Togar
The author has done something great here in that she has turned the drama facing a lot of American families right now into an enjoyable read appropriate for ages 11 and up. She has created characters that are extremely likeable and even though not all kids will be able to relate to their lifestyle of private pools, nannies and housekeepers, all will probably be able to identify with Jacki and her family's struggle to accept a life that doesn't include having everything they want. All the characters are fully developed and I really enjoyed the realistic family interactions. Jacki is an optimist and I think her naivete is a pretty realistic picture of kids her age and their lack of understanding of real world economic concepts. Her older sister Brooke seems to be hit hardest by the family's trouble and her struggles with coming to terms with the changes in her future were one of the best parts of the book.

This is a great fun read - Jacki is a lovable character that keeps you turning the pages just to find out what she's going to do next. Great fiction usually has a lesson or two to teach as well as entertatain the reader and this one succeeds in doing both. A big recommend, especially for ages 11-15.
Togar
The author has done something great here in that she has turned the drama facing a lot of American families right now into an enjoyable read appropriate for ages 11 and up. She has created characters that are extremely likeable and even though not all kids will be able to relate to their lifestyle of private pools, nannies and housekeepers, all will probably be able to identify with Jacki and her family's struggle to accept a life that doesn't include having everything they want. All the characters are fully developed and I really enjoyed the realistic family interactions. Jacki is an optimist and I think her naivete is a pretty realistic picture of kids her age and their lack of understanding of real world economic concepts. Her older sister Brooke seems to be hit hardest by the family's trouble and her struggles with coming to terms with the changes in her future were one of the best parts of the book.

This is a great fun read - Jacki is a lovable character that keeps you turning the pages just to find out what she's going to do next. Great fiction usually has a lesson or two to teach as well as entertatain the reader and this one succeeds in doing both. A big recommend, especially for ages 11-15.
Hasirri
Ninth grader Jacki couldn't care less about the "Great Recession" that's affecting the entire country. All she cares about is watching cute animal videos on YouTube and hanging out with her best friend. But when her mom loses her job, she's in for a major wake-up call. Suddenly, she and her sibs have no nanny to pick them up after school. There's no gardener to cut the grass, no maid to clean up after them, and they just might have to sell their house! How will her family survive? Flanked by a lively, well-rounded supporting cast, Jacki proves to be a quirky, charming, and memorable heroine with a fresh, original voice. This heartwarming and hilarious tale set in the current economic crisis is one that will appeal to all ages. Recommended for Ages 13-15.
Hasirri
Ninth grader Jacki couldn't care less about the "Great Recession" that's affecting the entire country. All she cares about is watching cute animal videos on YouTube and hanging out with her best friend. But when her mom loses her job, she's in for a major wake-up call. Suddenly, she and her sibs have no nanny to pick them up after school. There's no gardener to cut the grass, no maid to clean up after them, and they just might have to sell their house! How will her family survive? Flanked by a lively, well-rounded supporting cast, Jacki proves to be a quirky, charming, and memorable heroine with a fresh, original voice. This heartwarming and hilarious tale set in the current economic crisis is one that will appeal to all ages. Recommended for Ages 13-15.
Once again, Amy Koss has really created a book that middle school students can relate to especially during these hard economic times. Jacki is in 9th grade. She lives in a big house with a pool and money has never been an issue before, until now. Jacki's mother has been laid off from her job which puts the family into a financial crisis. The economy crashes and Jacki and her family must take a hard look at their life, such as big decisions on private versus public schools, college tuition for her sister out of state and selling their house and moving out of Los Angeles. But can they still be happy? Doesn't money buy happiness? A realistic look into the life of a teenager during very harsh times.
Once again, Amy Koss has really created a book that middle school students can relate to especially during these hard economic times. Jacki is in 9th grade. She lives in a big house with a pool and money has never been an issue before, until now. Jacki's mother has been laid off from her job which puts the family into a financial crisis. The economy crashes and Jacki and her family must take a hard look at their life, such as big decisions on private versus public schools, college tuition for her sister out of state and selling their house and moving out of Los Angeles. But can they still be happy? Doesn't money buy happiness? A realistic look into the life of a teenager during very harsh times.