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A Brief History of Montmaray (The Montmaray Journals) epub download

by Michelle Cooper


Home Michelle Cooper A Brief History of Montmaray. Now, did the presents arrive safely? I had to go all the way to Knightsbridge for the journal, and then I got detention for sneaking off from Games, so I hope you appreciate it. You can use it to write down your thoughts.

Home Michelle Cooper A Brief History of Montmaray. A Brief History of Montmaray, . You must have plenty of them at the moment, given Aunt Charlotte’s letter-I assume you’ve read it by now.

A Brief History of Montmaray book. But Princess Sophia is the storyteller of the FitzOsborne clan, and in A Brief History of Montmaray, through her journal she tells the story of the late months of 1936, as tensions simmer in a Europe on the brink of war. As the months pass, Sophia provides insight to the lives of her family in Montmaray, their struggles and their daily routines - and then the danger that strikes when a pair of men in a ship flying a swastika flag lands on their sovereign island.

The FitzOsbornes at War (The Montmaray Journals). The FitzOsbornes in Exile (The Montmaray Journals). A Brief History of Montmaray is an unexpectedly rich, meaty historical - from the fictional FitzOsborne family history that bore witness to the Battle of Hastings, Elizabeth I and the Spanish Armada, and the horrors of trench warfare in the Great War, to the inflammatory political ideals alternately capturing and horrifying the imaginations of the world in the 1930s.

Michelle Cooper is the author of The Rage of Sheep and The Montmaray Journals trilogy. The first Montmaray book, A Brief History of Montmaray, won a NSW Premier's Literary Award and was listed in the American Library Association's 2010 Best Books for Young Adults. Its sequel, The FitzOsbornes in Exile, was shortlisted for the NSW and WA Premier's Literary Awards, named a Children's Book Council Notable Book and listed in Kirkus Best Teen Books of 2011. The FitzOsbornes atWar concludes the Montmaray Journals. Michelle lives in Sydney and is currently working on her next book for teenagers.

About Michelle Cooper: Michelle Cooper writes novels for teenagers. The FitzOsbornes at War, the final book in The Montmaray Journals trilogy, was published in Australia and New Zealand in April, 2012 and in North America in October, 2012. The film and television rights to The Montmaray Journals have been optioned by a US production company. Her latest book is Dr Huxley’s Bequest: A History of Medicine in Thirteen Objects, which was shortlisted for the 2018 Young People's History Prize.

There’s a fine line between gossip and history when one is talking about kings

There’s a fine line between gossip and history when one is talking about kings.

Title: A Brief History of Montmaray. Author: Michelle Cooper. Genre: Historical Fiction, Young Adult, WWII. Publisher: Random House Australia (Aus), Random House Children’s Books (US) Publication Date: June 2008 (Aus), March 2011 (US) Paperback: 320 Pages (US). There’s a fine line between gossip and history, when one is talking about kings.

A brief history of montmaray. From the "Montmaray Journals" series. Cooper has created a strong cast of odd, interesting characters and makes even the strangeness of the setting and events seem completely plausible

A brief history of montmaray. Cooper has created a strong cast of odd, interesting characters and makes even the strangeness of the setting and events seem completely plausible. The author consciously echoes elements of Dodie Smith’s classic I Capture the Castle, but it is no mere copy. There is romance, adventure, a touch of the supernatural and a winning heroine who will touch the heart.

The FitzOsbornes and the Cold War by coltsbane for Emily. Fandoms: The Montmaray Journals - Michelle Cooper. No Archive Warnings Apply. Words: 332. Chapters: 1/1.

Then what is it? The Grail of the Cathars, the Pure Ones? he said.

“There’s a fine line between gossip and history, when one is talking about kings.”Sophie Fitzosborne lives in a crumbling castle in the tiny island kingdom of Montmaray with her eccentric and impoverished royal family. When she receives a journal for her sixteenth birthday, Sophie decides to chronicle day-to-day life on the island. But this is 1936, and the news that trickles in from the mainland reveals a world on the brink of war. The politics of Europe seem far away from their remote island—until two German officers land a boat on Montmaray. And then suddenly politics become very personal indeed.A Brief History of Montmaray is a heart-stopping tale of loyalty, love, and loss, and of fighting to hold on to home when the world is exploding all around you.“Once in a while, a special book will cross our paths and make us grateful for life and the ability to read. I’m talking about A Brief History of Montmaray by Michelle Cooper. I’m calling her Australia’s next stroke of literary brilliance.”—ViewpointFrom the Hardcover edition.

A Brief History of Montmaray (The Montmaray Journals) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0375851544

ISBN: 0375851542

Author: Michelle Cooper

Category: Young Adult and teen

Subcategory: Literature & Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers; Reprint edition (March 8, 2011)

Pages: 336 pages

ePUB size: 1909 kb

FB2 size: 1930 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 868

Other Formats: doc mobi lit lrf

Related to A Brief History of Montmaray (The Montmaray Journals) ePub books

RuTGamer
Because I have nine grandchildren, 5 of which fall into the category of teen or young adult, I read many teen and young adult books as a preface to providing them as gifts. A Brief History of Montmaray is at the top of my list for being entertaining, suspenseful, and well-written. The author paints such a vivid picture of this island and its inhabitants -- all through the eyes of a young teenage girl -- that it's hard to believe it's a fictitious place. I had to put a sweater on while reading because I could feel the chill in the dark and dank castle! What a talent Michelle Cooper has to be able to bring the characters so effectively to life just through a first person narrative! I'm not a teen or young adult, but I was totally captivated by the story, and I'm hoping for a sequel. Ms. Cooper didn't have to resort to vampires, werewolves, or the like to write a terrific book -- scary Nazis work just as well. I highly recommend it to teens, tweens, young adults, grandmothers -- anyone looking for a good read. The only problem was it was over too soon!
RuTGamer
Because I have nine grandchildren, 5 of which fall into the category of teen or young adult, I read many teen and young adult books as a preface to providing them as gifts. A Brief History of Montmaray is at the top of my list for being entertaining, suspenseful, and well-written. The author paints such a vivid picture of this island and its inhabitants -- all through the eyes of a young teenage girl -- that it's hard to believe it's a fictitious place. I had to put a sweater on while reading because I could feel the chill in the dark and dank castle! What a talent Michelle Cooper has to be able to bring the characters so effectively to life just through a first person narrative! I'm not a teen or young adult, but I was totally captivated by the story, and I'm hoping for a sequel. Ms. Cooper didn't have to resort to vampires, werewolves, or the like to write a terrific book -- scary Nazis work just as well. I highly recommend it to teens, tweens, young adults, grandmothers -- anyone looking for a good read. The only problem was it was over too soon!
Thorgahuginn
On a small island in the Bay of Biscay, between France and Spain, lies the Kingdom of Montmaray, home of Sophia FitzOsborne, her tomboy sister Henry, and older cousin Veronica. They, along with Veronica's mad father the king and Sophia's brother Toby, are the last members of a once-illustrious and colorful royal family dating back to the 11th century. But despite their titles and and wealth of familial history, the FitzOsbornes are nearly bankrupt, clinging to the crumbling family home with the aid of only a handful of loyal subjects. In many respects they are an isolated time capsule, a proud relic of happier and more plentiful times. In the fall of 1936 Sophia receives a journal for her sixteenth birthday and resolves to document her life -- the hopes, dreams, and everyday occurrences that make up her day to day life. She has no ambition of crafting an authoritative family history of the type Veronica works endlessly to compile -- but Sophia's scribblings are poised to become a critical record of a world on the brink of implosion. Montmaray may be small, but world events are destined to intrude on its shores, realigning Sophia's priorities and changing the course of her life forever. With the Spanish Civil War on one side and the heavy march of German Fascism on the other, Sophia is set to become the unlikely chronicler of a world on the cusp of war.

Sophia is an utterly beguiling narrator, her chronicle of life in her crumbling family home full of wry humor and razor-sharp, disarmingly honest observations. The first half of her journal has an almost fairy tale-like quality to it -- the closest literary equivalent that comes to mind is E. Nesbit's Five Children and It. Similar to Nesbit's classic, there's a quality almost akin to magical realism saturating the FitzOsbornes' lives -- two teenage girls, raising a ten-year-old, eking out a living on their wave-battered island because of the precedent of their royal lineage. But Sophia isn't content with tradition and dreams of life off Montmaray, of experiencing the "season" in London and falling in love. But as world events begin to intrude on the simple rhythms of their lives, Sophia begins to see herself as a chronicler of something more, her writing infused with fresh purpose as she records conflict first landing on Montmaray's shores.

Cooper's world-building is superb -- for a fictional kingdom and family, she's given the FitzOsbornes a gloriously realized, thorough history. Coupled with her deft characterizations and sure plotting, readers may find themselves forgetting that Sophia's journal is a work of fiction rather than autobiography. *wink* Cooper pairs her rich, descriptive world-building with a wealth of real-life history that sets this novel apart. A Brief History of Montmaray is an unexpectedly rich, meaty historical -- from the fictional FitzOsborne family history that bore witness to the Battle of Hastings, Elizabeth I and the Spanish Armada, and the horrors of trench warfare in the Great War, to the inflammatory political ideals alternately capturing and horrifying the imaginations of the world in the 1930s. Similarly to the recent re-boot of Upstairs Downstairs, through the eyes of Sophia and her family Cooper allows readers a window into the past as Toby meets Ambassador von Ribbentrop, Veronica debates fascism and socialism with the housekeeper's son, Simon, and the FitzOsbornes are shocked when Edward VIII abdicated to marry the twice-divorced Wallis Simpson.

Sophia's first journal is a lovely, absorbing read that deftly navigates the pivot from coming-of-age novel to high suspense with uncanny aplomb. This is a rare treat for readers of all persuasions, but an absolute gift for those passionate about this interwar time period and its affect on those living in such tumultuous times. A Brief History of Montmaray is an utterly captivating reading experience, a unique and memorable, thought-provoking blend of fact and fiction that entertains even as it inspires further reading and research. A marvelous introduction to Sophia and her world!
Thorgahuginn
On a small island in the Bay of Biscay, between France and Spain, lies the Kingdom of Montmaray, home of Sophia FitzOsborne, her tomboy sister Henry, and older cousin Veronica. They, along with Veronica's mad father the king and Sophia's brother Toby, are the last members of a once-illustrious and colorful royal family dating back to the 11th century. But despite their titles and and wealth of familial history, the FitzOsbornes are nearly bankrupt, clinging to the crumbling family home with the aid of only a handful of loyal subjects. In many respects they are an isolated time capsule, a proud relic of happier and more plentiful times. In the fall of 1936 Sophia receives a journal for her sixteenth birthday and resolves to document her life -- the hopes, dreams, and everyday occurrences that make up her day to day life. She has no ambition of crafting an authoritative family history of the type Veronica works endlessly to compile -- but Sophia's scribblings are poised to become a critical record of a world on the brink of implosion. Montmaray may be small, but world events are destined to intrude on its shores, realigning Sophia's priorities and changing the course of her life forever. With the Spanish Civil War on one side and the heavy march of German Fascism on the other, Sophia is set to become the unlikely chronicler of a world on the cusp of war.

Sophia is an utterly beguiling narrator, her chronicle of life in her crumbling family home full of wry humor and razor-sharp, disarmingly honest observations. The first half of her journal has an almost fairy tale-like quality to it -- the closest literary equivalent that comes to mind is E. Nesbit's Five Children and It. Similar to Nesbit's classic, there's a quality almost akin to magical realism saturating the FitzOsbornes' lives -- two teenage girls, raising a ten-year-old, eking out a living on their wave-battered island because of the precedent of their royal lineage. But Sophia isn't content with tradition and dreams of life off Montmaray, of experiencing the "season" in London and falling in love. But as world events begin to intrude on the simple rhythms of their lives, Sophia begins to see herself as a chronicler of something more, her writing infused with fresh purpose as she records conflict first landing on Montmaray's shores.

Cooper's world-building is superb -- for a fictional kingdom and family, she's given the FitzOsbornes a gloriously realized, thorough history. Coupled with her deft characterizations and sure plotting, readers may find themselves forgetting that Sophia's journal is a work of fiction rather than autobiography. *wink* Cooper pairs her rich, descriptive world-building with a wealth of real-life history that sets this novel apart. A Brief History of Montmaray is an unexpectedly rich, meaty historical -- from the fictional FitzOsborne family history that bore witness to the Battle of Hastings, Elizabeth I and the Spanish Armada, and the horrors of trench warfare in the Great War, to the inflammatory political ideals alternately capturing and horrifying the imaginations of the world in the 1930s. Similarly to the recent re-boot of Upstairs Downstairs, through the eyes of Sophia and her family Cooper allows readers a window into the past as Toby meets Ambassador von Ribbentrop, Veronica debates fascism and socialism with the housekeeper's son, Simon, and the FitzOsbornes are shocked when Edward VIII abdicated to marry the twice-divorced Wallis Simpson.

Sophia's first journal is a lovely, absorbing read that deftly navigates the pivot from coming-of-age novel to high suspense with uncanny aplomb. This is a rare treat for readers of all persuasions, but an absolute gift for those passionate about this interwar time period and its affect on those living in such tumultuous times. A Brief History of Montmaray is an utterly captivating reading experience, a unique and memorable, thought-provoking blend of fact and fiction that entertains even as it inspires further reading and research. A marvelous introduction to Sophia and her world!
Adrielmeena
This book is a checklist of all the things that make a little romantic literary girl with intellectual pretensions sigh long into the night. Set in 1936 on the fictional island of Montmaray (halfway between England and France), both the stakes and the political intrigue are high. The plot is seasoned with orphaned royals and a mad king for a nice Dickensian-Shakespearian-Bronte mashup, making this tiny island a microcosm of the microcosmic moors. Unlike much literature for this age group, Cooper respects the reader's intelligence all the way, and manages to subtly educate the reader through the protagonist's discoveries rather than through lecturing. It turns into a real page turner at the end, and I can't wait to read the next book. I highly recommend this for all literary-minded teens who stroll past their moonlit windows longing for the greater world, as well as for adults who've been out there and are now strangely nostalgic for their days of entrapment, when the life they live now was so much more intriguing.
Adrielmeena
This book is a checklist of all the things that make a little romantic literary girl with intellectual pretensions sigh long into the night. Set in 1936 on the fictional island of Montmaray (halfway between England and France), both the stakes and the political intrigue are high. The plot is seasoned with orphaned royals and a mad king for a nice Dickensian-Shakespearian-Bronte mashup, making this tiny island a microcosm of the microcosmic moors. Unlike much literature for this age group, Cooper respects the reader's intelligence all the way, and manages to subtly educate the reader through the protagonist's discoveries rather than through lecturing. It turns into a real page turner at the end, and I can't wait to read the next book. I highly recommend this for all literary-minded teens who stroll past their moonlit windows longing for the greater world, as well as for adults who've been out there and are now strangely nostalgic for their days of entrapment, when the life they live now was so much more intriguing.