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Abarat epub download

by Clive Barker


Clive Barker did a good job of Abarat, the alternative, too. The islands of the time of the day was a good way to do time travel (time is made up anyway and it can . be sure to check out Clive Barker's Abarat books 2 and 3 as well. Days of Magic, Nights of War Absolute Midnight.

Clive Barker did a good job of Abarat, the alternative, too. The islands of the time of the day was a good way to do time travel (time is made up anyway and it can be a different hour if you hop a plane, right?).

Abarat: Absolute Midnight. Clive Barker's First Tales. The Adventures of Mr. Maximillian Bacchus and His Travelling Circus. There’ll be no sun tomorrow morning. Days of Magic, Nights of War. Abarat. Coldheart Canyon: A Hollywood Ghost Story. Sherlock Holmes and the Servants of Hell.

Clive Barker is the bestselling author of twenty-two books, including the New York Times bestsellers Abarat; Abarat: Days of Magic, Nights of War; and The Thief of Always. He is also an acclaimed painter, film producer, and director. For twelve years Mr. Barker has been working on a vast array of paintings to illuminate the text of The Books of Abarat, more than one hundred and twenty-five of which can be found within this volume. Mr. Barker lives in California

Following the publication of the third Abarat book - Absolute Midnight - Clive has moved straight on to Volume Four, which has the final title 'Kry Rising'

Following the publication of the third Abarat book - Absolute Midnight - Clive has moved straight on to Volume Four, which has the final title 'Kry Rising'

Abarat (2002) is a fantasy novel written and illustrated by Clive Barker, the first in Barker's The Books of Abarat series. It is aimed primarily at young adults.

Abarat (2002) is a fantasy novel written and illustrated by Clive Barker, the first in Barker's The Books of Abarat series. The eponymous Abarat is a fictional archipelago which is the setting for the majority of the story. The title image contains an ambigram. The paintings in the book are done with oils. Barker had already completed 300 paintings before he started working on the first book

Publisher: Joanna Cotler Books ISBN 13: 9780002259521. Title: Abarat Item Condition: used item in a very good condition. Author: Clive Barker ISBN 10: 0002259524.

Publisher: Joanna Cotler Books ISBN 13: 9780002259521.

Abarat: The First Book of Hours. Previously, in 2007, both partners, Clive Barker and Chris Ryall have announced that there is an upcoming collaboration of an original comic book’s series. To be published by IDW, the piece entitled Torakator. Hardcover Paperback Kindle. Last 2009, IDW had published Seduth which is written by Chris Monfette and Clive Barker, it’s been the first time that Barker have created a comic medium book in two decades. In the year 2011, Boom Studios have started publicizing the original Hellraiser comic series, in a comic book format.

A journey beyond imagination is about to unfold. . . .

It begins in the most boring place in the world: Chickentown, U.S.A. There lives Candy Quackenbush, her heart bursting for some clue as to what her future might hold.

When the answer comes, it's not one she expects.

Welcome to the Abarat.

Abarat epub download

ISBN13: 978-0064407335

ISBN: 0064407330

Author: Clive Barker

Category: Young Adult and teen

Subcategory: Literature & Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: HarperCollins (September 30, 2003)

Pages: 432 pages

ePUB size: 1741 kb

FB2 size: 1572 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 678

Other Formats: docx mobi lrf doc

Related to Abarat ePub books

Taulkree
The book is good. However, it is hugely lost in this format because none of the beautiful images created for this story are included. There's well over 100 images in the book that are not in the kindle version Buy a hard copy. It's worth it.
Taulkree
The book is good. However, it is hugely lost in this format because none of the beautiful images created for this story are included. There's well over 100 images in the book that are not in the kindle version Buy a hard copy. It's worth it.
Yayrel
Introduction:
I purchased this book because a friend recommended it to me. It has a Harry Potter feel to it, but they are not that similar. To explain the title a little bit, the Abarat is really a cluster of islands in the story, 25 in total. Each island represents an hour of the day, so 7:00 pm would always be right after sunset, and the island would always be dark in the sky (the sun never moves). There is an extra island beyond those 24, as well, which you will read about in the book.

Pros:
Has a lot of interesting characters and ideas.
Good for young adults or children.
400 pages long which is not too short and not too long.
Fairly inexpensive to purchase ($8 at time of purchase for mass market paperback).

Cons:
Basically ends on a cliffhanger.
The character names are fairly contrived.

Conclusion:
I am satisfied with this book as an introduction to the series. The character names stuck out as contrived, but I think that's OK since it's a children's to young adult's novel. I did not like the fact that it ended on a cliffhanger, but I don't think that's enough of a reason to dock a star.
Yayrel
Introduction:
I purchased this book because a friend recommended it to me. It has a Harry Potter feel to it, but they are not that similar. To explain the title a little bit, the Abarat is really a cluster of islands in the story, 25 in total. Each island represents an hour of the day, so 7:00 pm would always be right after sunset, and the island would always be dark in the sky (the sun never moves). There is an extra island beyond those 24, as well, which you will read about in the book.

Pros:
Has a lot of interesting characters and ideas.
Good for young adults or children.
400 pages long which is not too short and not too long.
Fairly inexpensive to purchase ($8 at time of purchase for mass market paperback).

Cons:
Basically ends on a cliffhanger.
The character names are fairly contrived.

Conclusion:
I am satisfied with this book as an introduction to the series. The character names stuck out as contrived, but I think that's OK since it's a children's to young adult's novel. I did not like the fact that it ended on a cliffhanger, but I don't think that's enough of a reason to dock a star.
Tuliancel
I never thought I would like this book. Look at the cover. Feels like something from an old folklore to me. I'm not really much of a fan of those you see...

But then again, I should never judge a book by it's cover (I can't help it! XD)

Abarat is simply a story of a girl (which I dunno how old is she) who wants to escape her current life that when a door of opportunity had magically appeared, she smashed her way into it. Supposed a start of her new life on another realm, she found out that there's more to her than what she thought. With friends on her side and enemies on her tail, she was now determined to find out the secret of her past, the purpose of her present, and the mystery of her future.

So..... I forgot what I really want to say.

Welp, anyways! This had been an enjoyable journey to Abarat. The heroine's not your typical damsel in distress. She got a rebellious streak into her and had an adventurous soul. Though you'll feel you want to hit her sometimes. You'll find yourself rooting for her, gets amazed on the wonders she was seeing, and gets excited on the upcoming journeys, and secrets to unfold in the whole new world she found herself into.

Also, the author did a great job on the story telling. Though even if this is not my typical kinda story telling I'm used to, but I can still understand it. There's some words I don't understand but meh, maybe it's cuz I'm not a native speaker, but I can live with it, 'no problemo'.

Overall, great book! I'm excited for the next one!

PS: Once again, special thanks to the owner of this account. I never thought I can construct this long review. And I never ever thought I'll like this book even.

PPS: Don't forget "ALOSHA TRILOGY!"
Tuliancel
I never thought I would like this book. Look at the cover. Feels like something from an old folklore to me. I'm not really much of a fan of those you see...

But then again, I should never judge a book by it's cover (I can't help it! XD)

Abarat is simply a story of a girl (which I dunno how old is she) who wants to escape her current life that when a door of opportunity had magically appeared, she smashed her way into it. Supposed a start of her new life on another realm, she found out that there's more to her than what she thought. With friends on her side and enemies on her tail, she was now determined to find out the secret of her past, the purpose of her present, and the mystery of her future.

So..... I forgot what I really want to say.

Welp, anyways! This had been an enjoyable journey to Abarat. The heroine's not your typical damsel in distress. She got a rebellious streak into her and had an adventurous soul. Though you'll feel you want to hit her sometimes. You'll find yourself rooting for her, gets amazed on the wonders she was seeing, and gets excited on the upcoming journeys, and secrets to unfold in the whole new world she found herself into.

Also, the author did a great job on the story telling. Though even if this is not my typical kinda story telling I'm used to, but I can still understand it. There's some words I don't understand but meh, maybe it's cuz I'm not a native speaker, but I can live with it, 'no problemo'.

Overall, great book! I'm excited for the next one!

PS: Once again, special thanks to the owner of this account. I never thought I can construct this long review. And I never ever thought I'll like this book even.

PPS: Don't forget "ALOSHA TRILOGY!"
Weetont
I can appreciate what Clive Barker has done. This book contains an original world, at once dark and menacing and yet vibrantly beautiful. The first half of the book was especially gripping, as I felt very in-tune with the characters.

The second half of the book seemed to peter out. I felt like Barker lost focus on the plot. What began as strange and fantastical slowly dissolved into absurdity. There weren't enough concrete goals to keep my attention. It's not made clear what Candy's "key" is for, what any of the characters are really plotting, nor what's at stake. These things are mentioned in passing, but not fully explained, so there didn't seem to be any sense of urgency after a while.

At times Barker's descriptions of places and events were confusing, and I had to re-read the descriptions several times to get a feel of a place. I was most gripped by the character of Carrion, and yet we see so little of him. I found myself skimming over the story of Mischief, not truly interested in his struggles. It seemed that after Candy reaches the Abarat, her character begins to fluctuate rapidly, until she feels more like a puppet than a person. First she gives half of her money to a random stranger without asking anything in return. Then the woman kicks her out of her house, yet Candy doesn't seem to have any second thought about being taken advantage of and then discarded. She travels from one island to the next, doing whatever a situation demands with hardly any personal struggle. I wanted to see more emotional turmoil from her--more uncertainty, more doubt, more transformation, but instead she responds to each new situation with unconcerned practicality. Where is her growth as a character? What IS her character? What is she afraid of? What does she want? I really can't say.

Carrion is the only other character in the book that seemed to have any depth. Despite the dark dark world he lives in, he shows small moments of confusion, impracticality and a strange propriety that had me smiling at the page. The other characters are all very two-dimensional. Mischief, Malingo, Shape and the myriad of other minor characters don't really have anything unique about them, besides their bizarre appearance.

Candy realizes late in the game that Carrion is after her, yet she doesn't seem particularly afraid of Carrion, even though he is the big bad Lord of Midnight. I think this is where the conflict began to dissolve for me. Random people come to her aid in every situation for apparently no reason or purpose. She is suddenly extremely good at wielding magic and doesn't seem to think twice about it. I realize this is tied into her past somehow, but I would have enjoyed this book a lot more if Candy had more personal struggles and triumphs. About 2/3 of the way through, Candy finds out that word of her has spread throughout the islands and she has become somewhat famous. Her response? "Oh." She doesn't seem particularly overwhelmed, excited or worried about this. I feel like the girl she was in Chickentown is much more interesting than the girl she is becoming in Abarat. We don't see Abarat through her eyes, but through a lens of third-person narration, which somehow makes all the beautiful descriptions and fantastical places less interesting.

I might buy the second book. I don't know yet. But I was very disappointed by the ending of this one. 3 solid stars.
Weetont
I can appreciate what Clive Barker has done. This book contains an original world, at once dark and menacing and yet vibrantly beautiful. The first half of the book was especially gripping, as I felt very in-tune with the characters.

The second half of the book seemed to peter out. I felt like Barker lost focus on the plot. What began as strange and fantastical slowly dissolved into absurdity. There weren't enough concrete goals to keep my attention. It's not made clear what Candy's "key" is for, what any of the characters are really plotting, nor what's at stake. These things are mentioned in passing, but not fully explained, so there didn't seem to be any sense of urgency after a while.

At times Barker's descriptions of places and events were confusing, and I had to re-read the descriptions several times to get a feel of a place. I was most gripped by the character of Carrion, and yet we see so little of him. I found myself skimming over the story of Mischief, not truly interested in his struggles. It seemed that after Candy reaches the Abarat, her character begins to fluctuate rapidly, until she feels more like a puppet than a person. First she gives half of her money to a random stranger without asking anything in return. Then the woman kicks her out of her house, yet Candy doesn't seem to have any second thought about being taken advantage of and then discarded. She travels from one island to the next, doing whatever a situation demands with hardly any personal struggle. I wanted to see more emotional turmoil from her--more uncertainty, more doubt, more transformation, but instead she responds to each new situation with unconcerned practicality. Where is her growth as a character? What IS her character? What is she afraid of? What does she want? I really can't say.

Carrion is the only other character in the book that seemed to have any depth. Despite the dark dark world he lives in, he shows small moments of confusion, impracticality and a strange propriety that had me smiling at the page. The other characters are all very two-dimensional. Mischief, Malingo, Shape and the myriad of other minor characters don't really have anything unique about them, besides their bizarre appearance.

Candy realizes late in the game that Carrion is after her, yet she doesn't seem particularly afraid of Carrion, even though he is the big bad Lord of Midnight. I think this is where the conflict began to dissolve for me. Random people come to her aid in every situation for apparently no reason or purpose. She is suddenly extremely good at wielding magic and doesn't seem to think twice about it. I realize this is tied into her past somehow, but I would have enjoyed this book a lot more if Candy had more personal struggles and triumphs. About 2/3 of the way through, Candy finds out that word of her has spread throughout the islands and she has become somewhat famous. Her response? "Oh." She doesn't seem particularly overwhelmed, excited or worried about this. I feel like the girl she was in Chickentown is much more interesting than the girl she is becoming in Abarat. We don't see Abarat through her eyes, but through a lens of third-person narration, which somehow makes all the beautiful descriptions and fantastical places less interesting.

I might buy the second book. I don't know yet. But I was very disappointed by the ending of this one. 3 solid stars.
Nnulam
Abarat is Clive Barker's version of Alice in Wonderland. A little girl follows a strange man to a new world and encounters crazy characters while learning how to grow up.
I appreciated the imaginative characters and I liked the plucky main character. Unfortunately, the story sometimes felt a little flat. I got to the end and I didn't care that it ended in a cliffhanger. I had no desire to know what happens.
I can't put my finger on the problem, maybe the story was dragged out? Maybe there wasn't enough back history on all of the characters that were introduced? Something was just missing.
You might be better off sticking with Alice in Wonderland.
Nnulam
Abarat is Clive Barker's version of Alice in Wonderland. A little girl follows a strange man to a new world and encounters crazy characters while learning how to grow up.
I appreciated the imaginative characters and I liked the plucky main character. Unfortunately, the story sometimes felt a little flat. I got to the end and I didn't care that it ended in a cliffhanger. I had no desire to know what happens.
I can't put my finger on the problem, maybe the story was dragged out? Maybe there wasn't enough back history on all of the characters that were introduced? Something was just missing.
You might be better off sticking with Alice in Wonderland.