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Nine Days a Queen: The Short Life and Reign of Lady Jane Grey epub download

by Ann Rinaldi


Lady Jane Grey (c. 1537 – 12 February 1554), also known as Lady Jane Dudley (after her marriage) and as "the Nine Days' Queen", was an English noblewoman and de facto Queen of England and Ireland from 10 July until 19 July 1553

Lady Jane Grey (c. 1537 – 12 February 1554), also known as Lady Jane Dudley (after her marriage) and as "the Nine Days' Queen", was an English noblewoman and de facto Queen of England and Ireland from 10 July until 19 July 1553.

Nine Days a Queen book. These are the words of lady Jane Grey, as imagined by celebrated author Ann Rinaldi. Jane would become Queen of England for only nine days before being beheaded at the age of sixteen. Here is a breathtaking story of English royalty with its pageantry, privilege, and I had freckles. Would my feet even touch the ground if I sat on the throne? These are the words of lady Jane Grey, as imagined by celebrated author Ann Rinaldi.

Nine Days a Queen: The S. .has been added to your Cart. This is a very well written novel written in the first person about the life of Lady Jane Grey. The young girl who was Queen of England for nine days. It is a sad story, because the truth be told, Lady Jane's story is a sad one. However, the author does an excellent job of weaving in court intrigue of the time period and making us really feel for Lady Jane. Unfortunately, for Lady Jane, her mother was an evil woman who mistreated her horribly, simple because Lady Jane was good.

Lady Jane Grey Facts. 42. Humble Origins. Jane’s younger sister Catherine also spent the rest of her life in captivity, though she was never executed. Despite the heights she would (briefly) reach, Jane was not born to an important branch of the royal family tree. At the time of her birth, her parents weren’t really public figures, so her early life is unrecorded.

Lady Jane Grey, who at sixteen was Queen of England for nine days before being executed, recounts her life story from the age of nine. Donor challenge: For only 3 more days, your donation will be matched 2-to-1. Triple your impact! To the Internet Archive Community, Time is running out: please help the Internet Archive today.

It's a Young Adult book about the unfortunate Lady Jane Grey who became, against her will, Queen of England for nine days. This was after the young Edward VI, son of Henry VIII, died. It's about how Lady Jane Gray grew up and became queen because of King whatever-his-name is married her. But her cousin ("Bloody Mary") was jealous because SHE was supposed to be the new queen, and killed her. 0. 1.

Lady Jane Grey was the de facto monarch of England for a very short period from 10.

Lady Jane Grey was the de facto monarch of England for a very short period from 10 July until 19 July 1553. This biography profiles her childhood, life, achievements and timeline.

In NINE DAYS A QUEEN, author Ann Rinaldi brings to life the fascinating story of Lady Jane Grey. Lady Jane Grey led a life filled with privilege and emotional pain. Her heartbreaking life story will stay with the reader long after he or she puts the book down. In the opening of the novel Lady Jane Grey is a young girl of nine who is living with her parents, the Duke and Duchess Suffolk. Jane had two younger sisters, Catherine and Mary. Nine Days a Queen: The Short Life and Reign of Lady Jane Grey by Ann Rinaldi. Publication Date: February 1, 2005. Genres: Historical Fiction.

I had freckles. I had sandy hair. I was too short. Would my feet even touch the ground if I sat on the throne?

These are the words of lady Jane Grey, as imagined by celebrated author Ann Rinaldi. Jane would become Queen of England for only nine days before being beheaded at the age of sixteen.

Here is a breathtaking story of English royalty with its pageantry, privilege, and surprising cruelty. As she did in her previous novel Mutiny's Daughter, Ms. Rinaldi uses powerful, evocative writing to bring to life a teenage girl caught in the grip of stirring times.

Nine Days a Queen: The Short Life and Reign of Lady Jane Grey epub download

ISBN13: 978-0060549244

ISBN: 0060549246

Author: Ann Rinaldi

Category: Young Adult and teen

Subcategory: Historical Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: HarperTeen; 1st edition (January 18, 2005)

ePUB size: 1187 kb

FB2 size: 1784 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 438

Other Formats: doc docx mobi lrf

Related to Nine Days a Queen: The Short Life and Reign of Lady Jane Grey ePub books

Kea
I was a little disappointed when I got the book seeing how small it is. I got a paperback almost as small as a pocket book. I guess that is what I should have expected for the price. Anyway, it is a great reading for a small trip. The narration is done by the teenage Royal center of the story, so I would recommend it for a young reader. A few months ago I learned about this story by watching a ballet performance and was intrigued enough to want to learn more about the historical facts. It was worth it. It makes a very light reading but it grabs you with all the intrigues, plots, loneliness and unfairness that young royals in line to a throne may have experienced in a place like the English Court.
Kea
I was a little disappointed when I got the book seeing how small it is. I got a paperback almost as small as a pocket book. I guess that is what I should have expected for the price. Anyway, it is a great reading for a small trip. The narration is done by the teenage Royal center of the story, so I would recommend it for a young reader. A few months ago I learned about this story by watching a ballet performance and was intrigued enough to want to learn more about the historical facts. It was worth it. It makes a very light reading but it grabs you with all the intrigues, plots, loneliness and unfairness that young royals in line to a throne may have experienced in a place like the English Court.
Snowskin
Product arrived timely and as described. I haven't yet read the book. Thank you, Geralf
Snowskin
Product arrived timely and as described. I haven't yet read the book. Thank you, Geralf
Swift Summer
Poor Jane Seymour didn't want to be queen, But her family didn't give her a choice. Did she survive their manipulation, NO.
Swift Summer
Poor Jane Seymour didn't want to be queen, But her family didn't give her a choice. Did she survive their manipulation, NO.
Ffyan
I loved this book. So sad what happened to Jane Grey. It illustrates a wonderful & vivid story of her life & her emotions.
Ffyan
I loved this book. So sad what happened to Jane Grey. It illustrates a wonderful & vivid story of her life & her emotions.
FireWater
I have this book in my classroom library, and the girls absolutely love it. It's so exciting to see them plow through it and turn around and push it onto their friends. Studying the Tudor line recently as upperschoolers, the girls remembered studying them in middle school and had a lively discussion remembering Nine Days a Queen.
FireWater
I have this book in my classroom library, and the girls absolutely love it. It's so exciting to see them plow through it and turn around and push it onto their friends. Studying the Tudor line recently as upperschoolers, the girls remembered studying them in middle school and had a lively discussion remembering Nine Days a Queen.
Kulwes
The book arrived in excellent condition. We love Ann Rinaldi's books, and this is no exception. We'll learn a little more about England!
Kulwes
The book arrived in excellent condition. We love Ann Rinaldi's books, and this is no exception. We'll learn a little more about England!
Gaudiker
Looking forward to reading this book over the summer with so many others I have ordered recently. I know the story and I'm looking forward to reading this version as I really like historical novels.
Gaudiker
Looking forward to reading this book over the summer with so many others I have ordered recently. I know the story and I'm looking forward to reading this version as I really like historical novels.
It was refreshing and interesting to read a book based on Lady Jane Grey. She had been so overshadowed in history, and her sad nine days reign as queen was so overlooked, with no one even flinching over the fact of how she was so cruelly disposed of by her cousin Mary for a throne she never desired. What I really liked about this book is how the story and life of Jane were told through her perspective, and how every historical fact was portrayed through Jane’s own thoughts, making the book historically accurate, while at the same time not make it seem like just another history textbook. Because of this format, I believe this book; and books written with perspectives like this would be a great way for students to learn about history, because it is similar to a primary source, while at the same time it’s modified to a format where modern readers can understand easily.

The first thing I did after I finished reading the book, and was about to start the review, was to check the book’s bibliography. Because this is not a history textbook or encyclopedia whatsoever, I was curious to check Jane’s portrayal accuracy through the author’s sources. The first thing I noticed was that every single one of her source was published before the year 2002.[1] ­In other words, many of them are more primary sources than an actual encyclopedia. This means that the author, instead of focusing the facts provided on Jane through the atlas and Wikipedias, spent her time in looking at primary sources so she can actually get the scenarios and facts through her perspective, in order to improve the accuracy of her writing this book as her. I believe this greatly improved the accuracy of the book because instead of just writing inaccurate facts, the author used the primary source to know when to put in false biased facts, due to the scenarios. This creates a situation of dramatic irony for the readers because when the reader read the bias that would’ve been in Jane’s perspectives, they would know the truth while the book doesn’t. Examples of these would be when Jane believed Elizabeth I (not yet crowned queen, was still a princess) had witch blood in her, because her mother Anne Boleyn was executed of witchcraft, and was believed to be a witch. The readers today know for certain that it was not true, but how Jane was wary of Elizabeth due to this fact is an excellent example of how the writer wrote in false facts that would’ve been believed as truth in that time, hence fore increasing the credibility of the book.

Jane’s tragic fate made her, in a very strange way, almost the Marie Antoinette of England. Both never really had a choice in their fates, because they were put in positions of power most likely against their will, without ever truly knowing how to explicitly use that position of power. Not to add on the result of both the women’s tragic fate was not a direct cause of their actions or choices, but more of a result of the other’s misdoings. I, as a reader, found myself more and more weary as the book progressed. I came into the book having absolutely not a single care in a world, or an ounce of compassion for Jane whatsoever, and left it feeling like a broken-hearted person living only on the false hope that maybe it wasn’t as bad as it truly was. This book by putting in Jane through the perspectives of a story’s heroine really made me feel compassion for her. She was so naïve, and her life was a stepping stone for all the power-hungry people around her, and her death was a direct cause of that. I would definitely recommend this book to…all readers actually. It would not only be a more fun way for students to learn about historical figures, but it can also almost give the exact same effect as reading a primary source, only more interesting.
It was refreshing and interesting to read a book based on Lady Jane Grey. She had been so overshadowed in history, and her sad nine days reign as queen was so overlooked, with no one even flinching over the fact of how she was so cruelly disposed of by her cousin Mary for a throne she never desired. What I really liked about this book is how the story and life of Jane were told through her perspective, and how every historical fact was portrayed through Jane’s own thoughts, making the book historically accurate, while at the same time not make it seem like just another history textbook. Because of this format, I believe this book; and books written with perspectives like this would be a great way for students to learn about history, because it is similar to a primary source, while at the same time it’s modified to a format where modern readers can understand easily.

The first thing I did after I finished reading the book, and was about to start the review, was to check the book’s bibliography. Because this is not a history textbook or encyclopedia whatsoever, I was curious to check Jane’s portrayal accuracy through the author’s sources. The first thing I noticed was that every single one of her source was published before the year 2002.[1] ­In other words, many of them are more primary sources than an actual encyclopedia. This means that the author, instead of focusing the facts provided on Jane through the atlas and Wikipedias, spent her time in looking at primary sources so she can actually get the scenarios and facts through her perspective, in order to improve the accuracy of her writing this book as her. I believe this greatly improved the accuracy of the book because instead of just writing inaccurate facts, the author used the primary source to know when to put in false biased facts, due to the scenarios. This creates a situation of dramatic irony for the readers because when the reader read the bias that would’ve been in Jane’s perspectives, they would know the truth while the book doesn’t. Examples of these would be when Jane believed Elizabeth I (not yet crowned queen, was still a princess) had witch blood in her, because her mother Anne Boleyn was executed of witchcraft, and was believed to be a witch. The readers today know for certain that it was not true, but how Jane was wary of Elizabeth due to this fact is an excellent example of how the writer wrote in false facts that would’ve been believed as truth in that time, hence fore increasing the credibility of the book.

Jane’s tragic fate made her, in a very strange way, almost the Marie Antoinette of England. Both never really had a choice in their fates, because they were put in positions of power most likely against their will, without ever truly knowing how to explicitly use that position of power. Not to add on the result of both the women’s tragic fate was not a direct cause of their actions or choices, but more of a result of the other’s misdoings. I, as a reader, found myself more and more weary as the book progressed. I came into the book having absolutely not a single care in a world, or an ounce of compassion for Jane whatsoever, and left it feeling like a broken-hearted person living only on the false hope that maybe it wasn’t as bad as it truly was. This book by putting in Jane through the perspectives of a story’s heroine really made me feel compassion for her. She was so naïve, and her life was a stepping stone for all the power-hungry people around her, and her death was a direct cause of that. I would definitely recommend this book to…all readers actually. It would not only be a more fun way for students to learn about historical figures, but it can also almost give the exact same effect as reading a primary source, only more interesting.