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The Lost Heart of Asia epub download

by Colin Thubron


Read On. Also By Colin Thubron. This journey was undertaken during the first spring and summer of Central Asia’s independence from Moscow.

Read On. A brief visit the year before yielded some valued friends; but in the shadow of political uncertainty the identity of several people recorded here has been disguised. Years earlier I had travelled in the nearer Moslem world, then the European Soviet Union (for which I learnt a halting Russian) and eventually China

A travel book with a slice of history. Colin Thubron travelled through these newly-independent countries almost immediately after they had left the USSR, and so he captures them at a unique time transition in their history.

A travel book with a slice of history. He records that moment when they were neither one thing nor the other. Some people hankered for the stable past of full employment and economic security. Others looked forward to a future which, though it might be uncertain, with unemployment and rampant inflation, at least A travel book with a slice of history.

Thubron's travels in the heart of Central Asia are for the most part a dour affair. He has a brilliant way with words and pen portraits of various informants spring to life with a mere description of an eyebrow and moustache

Thubron's travels in the heart of Central Asia are for the most part a dour affair. He has a brilliant way with words and pen portraits of various informants spring to life with a mere description of an eyebrow and moustache. Few travellers would invite then sustain situations and people he encounters and seems to thrive on.

Thubron travelled throughout Central Asia in the wake of the break-up of the Soviet .

Thubron travelled throughout Central Asia in the wake of the break-up of the Soviet Union and documented the widespread social upheaval in a region reeling from political change. Thubron is an inspirational writer, intrepid traveller and insightful observer and his The Lost Heart of Asia is an outstanding guide to the history, people and culture of a vast region resonating with history and politics.

Thubron's first travel book, Mirror to Damascus, was published in 1967, the first such book on the city for a century The Lost Heart of Asia – Heinemann, 1994. In Siberia – Chatto & Windus, 1999.

Thubron's first travel book, Mirror to Damascus, was published in 1967, the first such book on the city for a century. While starting a parallel career as a novelist, he completed a travel book on Cyprus, Journey into Cyprus, in 1974, just before Turkey invaded the island. The Lost Heart of Asia – Heinemann, 1994. Shadow of the Silk Road, Chatto & Windus, 2006.

Its fields petered out in formless swamps, then vanished beneath the dunes. The peasant woman seated beside me stepped down from our bus near the last village and walked off into emptiness. e region west of Bukhara had been densely populated as late as the eleventh century, and here and there spectral mounds and ridges swelled under the saxaul; but it was impossible to tell if they were the burial-place of forts and villages, or a chance collation of dust. Our bus clattered and droned in the silence.

Thubron, Colin, 1939- - Travel - Asia, Central. Asia, Central - Description and travel. HarperCollins Publishers. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Kahle/Austin Foundation. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on December 19, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

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A land of enormous proportions, countless secrets, and incredible history, Central Asia was the heart of the great Mongol empire of Tamerlane and scene of Stalin's cruelest deportations. A remote and fascinating region in a constant state of transition-never more so than since the collapse of the Soviet Union-it encompasses terrain as diverse as the Kazakh steppes, the Karakum desert, and the Pamir mountains.

A land of enormous proportions, countless secrets, and incredible history, Central Asia--the heart of the great Mongol empire of Tamerlane, site of the legendary Silk Route and scene of Stalin's cruelest deportations--is a remote and fascinating region. Since the collapse of the Soviet Union and the emergence of newly independent republics, Central Asia--containing the magical cities of Bukhara and Samarkand, and terrain as diverse as the Kazakh steppes, the Karakum desert, and the Pamir mountains--has been in a constant state of transition. The Lost Heart of Asia takes readers into the very heart of this little visited, yet increasingly important region, delivering a rare and moving portrayal of a world in the midst of change.

The Lost Heart of Asia epub download

ISBN13: 978-0060926564

ISBN: 0060926562

Author: Colin Thubron

Category: Travel

Subcategory: Asia

Language: English

Publisher: Harper Perennial (September 1, 1995)

Pages: 384 pages

ePUB size: 1949 kb

FB2 size: 1232 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 557

Other Formats: rtf mobi docx lrf

Related to The Lost Heart of Asia ePub books

Makaitist
Enchanted by this author's trip along what he insists on describing as "The Silk Road" (a misnomer coined in the nineteenth century by German geographer Ferdinand von Richtofen, two thousand years after the trampling of the various northern Asian trade routes, this in turn a fact established long before silk was included among the panorama of merchandise), I was eager to continue with him in Central Asia. To my dismay I discovered a pitiable travel journal, superficial at best, often erroneous, unbearably naïve, written just after the Independence of what had been carved out of prior empires and khanates to constitute the five Inner Asian provinces of first Tsarist and then Soviet Russia. These wild and storm tossed lands had always been governed by a succession of tribes who ultimately found themselves caught up in the century of the Great Game, the sparring of Russia and Britain for control of the access routes into India. The subsequent disappointment, following the fall of the Soviet Unión, was magnified by climate change, the shifting of the desert sands, rivers moving in their course, government ineptitude, inflation and mismanagement, along with a crisis of both political and religious faith, neither of which had ever been clearly defined. And so progresses the book, to the same degree not really very clearly defined. It never takes shape, its convictions are vague and its judgements are vapid at best.
Makaitist
Enchanted by this author's trip along what he insists on describing as "The Silk Road" (a misnomer coined in the nineteenth century by German geographer Ferdinand von Richtofen, two thousand years after the trampling of the various northern Asian trade routes, this in turn a fact established long before silk was included among the panorama of merchandise), I was eager to continue with him in Central Asia. To my dismay I discovered a pitiable travel journal, superficial at best, often erroneous, unbearably naïve, written just after the Independence of what had been carved out of prior empires and khanates to constitute the five Inner Asian provinces of first Tsarist and then Soviet Russia. These wild and storm tossed lands had always been governed by a succession of tribes who ultimately found themselves caught up in the century of the Great Game, the sparring of Russia and Britain for control of the access routes into India. The subsequent disappointment, following the fall of the Soviet Unión, was magnified by climate change, the shifting of the desert sands, rivers moving in their course, government ineptitude, inflation and mismanagement, along with a crisis of both political and religious faith, neither of which had ever been clearly defined. And so progresses the book, to the same degree not really very clearly defined. It never takes shape, its convictions are vague and its judgements are vapid at best.
Madis
Thubron's travels in the heart of Central Asia are for the most part a dour affair. He has a brilliant way with words and pen portraits of various informants spring to life with a mere description of an eyebrow and moustache. Few travellers would invite then sustain situations and people he encounters and seems to thrive on. They are fodder for his wry and frequently sardonic humour and his icy distance from them is maintained throughout. His architectural descriptions are the most elevating, despite the ruined state of many of the iconic buildings and suspect renovations to others. Conceding these gifts he frequently deploys excess adjectives which frustrated my reading at times. But such hindrances were trifling in the general flow.
Madis
Thubron's travels in the heart of Central Asia are for the most part a dour affair. He has a brilliant way with words and pen portraits of various informants spring to life with a mere description of an eyebrow and moustache. Few travellers would invite then sustain situations and people he encounters and seems to thrive on. They are fodder for his wry and frequently sardonic humour and his icy distance from them is maintained throughout. His architectural descriptions are the most elevating, despite the ruined state of many of the iconic buildings and suspect renovations to others. Conceding these gifts he frequently deploys excess adjectives which frustrated my reading at times. But such hindrances were trifling in the general flow.
Malak
What I enjoyed about this was not JUST the unique subject - how many travelogues of central Asia have you come across? - and not just the author's skill in painting a picture with words, but the time in history he was able to capture when the ending of the cold war was still fresh, the Soviet Union only recently buried, and the people most affected by it still trying to decide what it meant for them, and what their future held. In this I found not only Mr. Thubron's skill in painting vivid landscape without actually using a picture (with which I'm becoming familiar), but a rich look into both ancient and recent history that hasn't seemed to be as thoroughly addressed in the West.
Malak
What I enjoyed about this was not JUST the unique subject - how many travelogues of central Asia have you come across? - and not just the author's skill in painting a picture with words, but the time in history he was able to capture when the ending of the cold war was still fresh, the Soviet Union only recently buried, and the people most affected by it still trying to decide what it meant for them, and what their future held. In this I found not only Mr. Thubron's skill in painting vivid landscape without actually using a picture (with which I'm becoming familiar), but a rich look into both ancient and recent history that hasn't seemed to be as thoroughly addressed in the West.
kolos
an intersting book for any history buff or any interest in adventure travel especially concerning the historical places along the silk road. The characters the author meets gives one quite in insight on the way of life in an area and how the environment shapes the type of person and character that develops due to those circumstances. The dangereous situations that the author was experiencing would shake anyone but he seems handle each one with the equanimity and calm of a seasoned adventurer.Well worth the read especially if you are curious about the state of these historical places at that time period.
kolos
an intersting book for any history buff or any interest in adventure travel especially concerning the historical places along the silk road. The characters the author meets gives one quite in insight on the way of life in an area and how the environment shapes the type of person and character that develops due to those circumstances. The dangereous situations that the author was experiencing would shake anyone but he seems handle each one with the equanimity and calm of a seasoned adventurer.Well worth the read especially if you are curious about the state of these historical places at that time period.
Zinnthi
An interesting albeit a bit overwritten and flowerlike view of central asía. I traveled through this region eight years later and it had already changed a great deal. Interesting to compare my experience and what he found in the early 90.s
Zinnthi
An interesting albeit a bit overwritten and flowerlike view of central asía. I traveled through this region eight years later and it had already changed a great deal. Interesting to compare my experience and what he found in the early 90.s
Duktilar
Colin Thubron has the ability to put the reader into the atmospherics of foreign lands. He fills his books with sounds and temperatures of other worlds and paints the histories of these lands so we can understand some of the mechanisms of the past which seem to drive the present in today's Middle East and Far East, along with descriptive commentary on the characters he meets along the way. He clarifies what the news refuses to provide us, and opens us up to the ancient movers of history abroad, resplendent with both the good and murderous qualities they displayed. Wonderful reads.
Duktilar
Colin Thubron has the ability to put the reader into the atmospherics of foreign lands. He fills his books with sounds and temperatures of other worlds and paints the histories of these lands so we can understand some of the mechanisms of the past which seem to drive the present in today's Middle East and Far East, along with descriptive commentary on the characters he meets along the way. He clarifies what the news refuses to provide us, and opens us up to the ancient movers of history abroad, resplendent with both the good and murderous qualities they displayed. Wonderful reads.
Moronydit
I ordered this book after having been blown away by his later book --the third book in his Soviet Union trilogy --IN SIBERIA, which I thought was absolutely amazing and incredibly involving and one of the best travel essays I ahve ever encountered--this book was good, but not quite up to my expectations which may have been too high based on the earlier read--in any event Thurbon is truly my hero, my soul -mate and I admit I have lived vicariously through these two books -- he is, if half of his adventures are true, an amazingly persistent and daring traveler. He has obviously done extensive research in anticipation of his travels to these remote and apparently soemwhat dangerous spots and I look forward to spending more time this Summer sharing more of his adventures --though many iof his earlier books are, unfortunately, currently out-of-print.
Moronydit
I ordered this book after having been blown away by his later book --the third book in his Soviet Union trilogy --IN SIBERIA, which I thought was absolutely amazing and incredibly involving and one of the best travel essays I ahve ever encountered--this book was good, but not quite up to my expectations which may have been too high based on the earlier read--in any event Thurbon is truly my hero, my soul -mate and I admit I have lived vicariously through these two books -- he is, if half of his adventures are true, an amazingly persistent and daring traveler. He has obviously done extensive research in anticipation of his travels to these remote and apparently soemwhat dangerous spots and I look forward to spending more time this Summer sharing more of his adventures --though many iof his earlier books are, unfortunately, currently out-of-print.
Most definitely not a 'page-turner', but endlessly fascinating. The book in many ways reads just like the author's journey. A land of rich but almost forgotten history (a Canadian speaking), but populated by people of endless perseverance and adaptability; torn between the depth of their extraordinary history and the apparent bleakness of their present. Reading the book, one cannot but hope for their future to be better than the present, perhaps even an echo of their past glories.
Most definitely not a 'page-turner', but endlessly fascinating. The book in many ways reads just like the author's journey. A land of rich but almost forgotten history (a Canadian speaking), but populated by people of endless perseverance and adaptability; torn between the depth of their extraordinary history and the apparent bleakness of their present. Reading the book, one cannot but hope for their future to be better than the present, perhaps even an echo of their past glories.