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Space Shuttle Decision, 1965-1972 (History of the Space Shuttle) epub download

by T. A. Heppenheimer


Space Shuttle Decision, 1965-1972 (History of the Space Shuttle, Volume 1) by T. A. Heppenheimer .

As a historian of the space program this book was perfect for me. It is very detailed with minutiae about the engineering and political issues that took place during the development of the Space Transportation System. This book is not light reading as most will bog down learning about how the sausage is made.

Heppenheimer looks back at the shuttle's technical antecedents such as the X-15 rocket plane and rocket booster technologies, and illuminates the principal personalities involved in the space shuttle decision and their motivations. He traces NASA's evolving program goals, the technical calculations, political maneuvering, and fiscal constraints, and explains the myriad Heppenheimer looks back at the shuttle's technical antecedents such as the X-15 rocket plane and rocket booster technologies, and illuminates the principal personalities involved in the space shuttle decision and.

Volume Two traces the development of the shuttle through a decade of engineering setbacks and breakthroughs .

Volume Two traces the development of the shuttle through a decade of engineering setbacks and breakthroughs, program-management challenges, and political strategizing, culminating in the first launch in April 1981. The focus is on the engineering n, thermal protection, electronics, onboard systems-and the author covers in depth the alternative vehicles developed by the . Air Force and European countries. T. Heppenheimer is the author of seven books including The Space Shuttle Decision, 1965-1972: History of the Space Shuttle, Volume 1 (Smithsonian Books, 2002) and Countdown: A History of the Space Program (1995).

History of the Space Shuttle.

History of the Space Shuttle Vol. 1: The Space Shuttle Decision, 1965-1972 Heppenheimer looks back at the shuttle's technical antecedents such as the X-15 rocket plane and rocket booster technologies, and illuminates the principal personalities involved in the space shuttle decision and their motivations. He traces NASA's evolving programme goals, the technical calculations, political maneuvering, and fiscal constraints, and explains the myriad designs that preceded the shuttle concept. History of the Space Shuttle.

Heppenheimer looks back at the shuttle's technical antecedents such as the X-15 rocket plane and rocket booster .

Thomas A. Heppenheimer (born Ja. His books are on the recommended reading list of the National Space Society. Countdown: A History of Space Flight (1999). Development of the Space Shuttle, 1972-1981. Heppenheimer (born Jan. 1, 1947; died Sept. A brief history of flight : from balloons to Mach 3 and beyond (2001). Colonies in Space (Stackpole, 1977). Smithsonian Institution Press, 2002. Facing the Heat Barrier: A History of Hypersonics.

History of the Space Shuttle

History of the Space Shuttle. Shuttle History Archive at Kennedy Space Center : A fine collection of materials relating to each Space Shuttle mission including an impressive collection of images. Shuttle Press Kits: Rich Orloff has scanned and formatted press kits for all the Shuttle flights except for dedicated DoD missions. Space Shuttle Fact Sheet. Shuttle Operational Data Book : commonly called the "green book," this is a good reference work containing technical data that is updated by the Johnson Space Center. If an individual pdf file appears blank, trying reloading that page.

Space stations and winged rockets - NASA's uncertain future - Mars and other dream worlds - Winter of discontent - Shuttle to the forefront - Economics and the shuttle - Aerospace recession - A shuttle to fit the budget - Nixon's d. .

Space stations and winged rockets - NASA's uncertain future - Mars and other dream worlds - Winter of discontent - Shuttle to the forefront - Economics and the shuttle - Aerospace recession - A shuttle to fit the budget - Nixon's decision. Includes bibliographical references (p. 437-446).

Space Shuttle Decision, 1965-1972 (History of the Space Shuttle) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0613922357

ISBN: 0613922352

Author: T. A. Heppenheimer

Category: Transportation

Subcategory: Engineering

Language: English

Publisher: Topeka Bindery (May 2002)

ePUB size: 1758 kb

FB2 size: 1834 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 755

Other Formats: rtf lit mbr txt

Related to Space Shuttle Decision, 1965-1972 (History of the Space Shuttle) ePub books

Marilbine
In my previous studies of the Space Race and America's space program, I focused on our response to Sputnik and the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo Programs. While I had read about many of the various aspects of the Shuttle Program I have never read specifically about the genesis, evolution and production of the Shuttle. I was amazed by the depth and breadth of sources, information and analysis presented by Heppenheimer in this book. I didn't know just how long the gestation period was for NASA figuring out just what they wanted in a reusable spacecraft system. The numerous proposals and revisions were an interesting evolution that was greatly impacted by politics and the need for federal funding to bring the Shuttle to fruition. Coming off of the high of landing Americans on the moon and safely returning them to earth had many in NASA thinking about targeting Mars as the next major goal. The reality of the budgetary pressures brought by the Vietnam War, the Great Society, and the short-term budgetary planning process crippled the proposed post- Apollo applications to build a space station, a reusable Shuttle, a return to build bases on the moon and manned missions to Mars. NASA had to scrap or radically change their post-Apollo ambitions to get Apollo missions 16 and 17, Skylab and finally the Shuttle. The political battle to finally arrive at a Shuttle design that could make it through Congress revealed the many compromises made that would later come back to haunt NASA with the tragic loss of Challenger and Columbia. Heppenheimer details the lengthy process the leadership of NASA went through to accommodate the US Air Force in return for their political support which resulted in major changes to the final Shuttle design. This book should be required reading for anyone who is interested in how the Space Transportation System evolved into the flawed Shuttle used for 30 years by NASA. Given the vast and myriad technical problems that NASA and their contractors had to solve under severe budget constraints I am amazed that the Shuttle worked as well as it did. The Shuttle never did fly every two weeks nor did it reduce the cost to access LEO but thanks to the dedication of the NASA and contractor workforce the Shuttle successfully launched and landed 133 out of 135 times. Heppenheimer is to be congratulated for making this often dense and confusing technical and political history accessible to all who are interested in the space program.
Marilbine
In my previous studies of the Space Race and America's space program, I focused on our response to Sputnik and the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo Programs. While I had read about many of the various aspects of the Shuttle Program I have never read specifically about the genesis, evolution and production of the Shuttle. I was amazed by the depth and breadth of sources, information and analysis presented by Heppenheimer in this book. I didn't know just how long the gestation period was for NASA figuring out just what they wanted in a reusable spacecraft system. The numerous proposals and revisions were an interesting evolution that was greatly impacted by politics and the need for federal funding to bring the Shuttle to fruition. Coming off of the high of landing Americans on the moon and safely returning them to earth had many in NASA thinking about targeting Mars as the next major goal. The reality of the budgetary pressures brought by the Vietnam War, the Great Society, and the short-term budgetary planning process crippled the proposed post- Apollo applications to build a space station, a reusable Shuttle, a return to build bases on the moon and manned missions to Mars. NASA had to scrap or radically change their post-Apollo ambitions to get Apollo missions 16 and 17, Skylab and finally the Shuttle. The political battle to finally arrive at a Shuttle design that could make it through Congress revealed the many compromises made that would later come back to haunt NASA with the tragic loss of Challenger and Columbia. Heppenheimer details the lengthy process the leadership of NASA went through to accommodate the US Air Force in return for their political support which resulted in major changes to the final Shuttle design. This book should be required reading for anyone who is interested in how the Space Transportation System evolved into the flawed Shuttle used for 30 years by NASA. Given the vast and myriad technical problems that NASA and their contractors had to solve under severe budget constraints I am amazed that the Shuttle worked as well as it did. The Shuttle never did fly every two weeks nor did it reduce the cost to access LEO but thanks to the dedication of the NASA and contractor workforce the Shuttle successfully launched and landed 133 out of 135 times. Heppenheimer is to be congratulated for making this often dense and confusing technical and political history accessible to all who are interested in the space program.
Doukasa
I remember when the Shuttle program was being debated in the early 1970s, but at the time I viewed it as a simple pro-space (good!) vs. anti-space (bad!) argument. Partly this was my relative youth, and partly the fault of the over-simplified reporting of the time. This book provides the background--technical, financial, and political--to show that the decision was far more complex than that. And it left me with a greater appreciation of the Shuttle and both its strengths and limitations.
The book covers the difficulties NASA had in trying to figure out what to do after Apollo, when public and financial support for the space program was waning. The Vietnam war, a faltering economy, the election of Richard Nixon, the decline of the Soviet space program, and a new focus on earthbound problems all made NASA's grand plans for manned Mars missions, space stations, and moon bases financially out of reach. The days of Apollo-era blank-check budgeting for NASA had actually ended in 1966.
Eventually focusing on reducing the cost of getting payloads into space--with grander plans deferred to the future--the Shuttle program went through many possible configurations. For the technically inclined, some of the discarded shuttle concepts are fascinating. And the amount of technology that had already been developed for other programs was a surprise to me. But as important as the technical issues were, the process of getting a budget through the White House and a hostile Congress were just as difficult. The result of this meeting of technology and budget is the Shuttle that flys today.
Rather than focusing only on the final Shuttle design, the author takes us through various technology stories that defined the environment in which the Shuttle was being contemplated. Those stories include the X-15, SST, 747, L-1011, spy satellites, and the cancelled Apollo Applications program. They might seem unrelated but the author makes it clear how they all fit together.
Although easy-to-read, the author doesn't skimp on technical detail, and makes even the arcane budgeting process seem understandable. It makes many of the events I remember from that time seem less random. Even the political opponents of the space program come off as more rational (if still misguided) than in most books on the space program. (But some decisions, such as cutting a third of the Apollo missions to save less than 10% of the budget, still seem remarkably stupid.)
If you've already exhausted the available books on the glory days of NASA (Mercury, Gemini, Apollo), or want to gain an understanding of how we got where we are today, I recommend this book for a view of the transition period to the modern NASA, and the development of a technological marvel. I look forward to reading the second volume in the series.
Doukasa
I remember when the Shuttle program was being debated in the early 1970s, but at the time I viewed it as a simple pro-space (good!) vs. anti-space (bad!) argument. Partly this was my relative youth, and partly the fault of the over-simplified reporting of the time. This book provides the background--technical, financial, and political--to show that the decision was far more complex than that. And it left me with a greater appreciation of the Shuttle and both its strengths and limitations.
The book covers the difficulties NASA had in trying to figure out what to do after Apollo, when public and financial support for the space program was waning. The Vietnam war, a faltering economy, the election of Richard Nixon, the decline of the Soviet space program, and a new focus on earthbound problems all made NASA's grand plans for manned Mars missions, space stations, and moon bases financially out of reach. The days of Apollo-era blank-check budgeting for NASA had actually ended in 1966.
Eventually focusing on reducing the cost of getting payloads into space--with grander plans deferred to the future--the Shuttle program went through many possible configurations. For the technically inclined, some of the discarded shuttle concepts are fascinating. And the amount of technology that had already been developed for other programs was a surprise to me. But as important as the technical issues were, the process of getting a budget through the White House and a hostile Congress were just as difficult. The result of this meeting of technology and budget is the Shuttle that flys today.
Rather than focusing only on the final Shuttle design, the author takes us through various technology stories that defined the environment in which the Shuttle was being contemplated. Those stories include the X-15, SST, 747, L-1011, spy satellites, and the cancelled Apollo Applications program. They might seem unrelated but the author makes it clear how they all fit together.
Although easy-to-read, the author doesn't skimp on technical detail, and makes even the arcane budgeting process seem understandable. It makes many of the events I remember from that time seem less random. Even the political opponents of the space program come off as more rational (if still misguided) than in most books on the space program. (But some decisions, such as cutting a third of the Apollo missions to save less than 10% of the budget, still seem remarkably stupid.)
If you've already exhausted the available books on the glory days of NASA (Mercury, Gemini, Apollo), or want to gain an understanding of how we got where we are today, I recommend this book for a view of the transition period to the modern NASA, and the development of a technological marvel. I look forward to reading the second volume in the series.
Kezan
Very good history of the political and technical saga/drama surrounding the shuttle!!!!
Kezan
Very good history of the political and technical saga/drama surrounding the shuttle!!!!
generation of new
Excellent review of the technical trades blended with the economic and political forces on NASA as they worked to get the space shuttle program approved and funded.
generation of new
Excellent review of the technical trades blended with the economic and political forces on NASA as they worked to get the space shuttle program approved and funded.
Wnex
I wish I could say I read this book, however I received Volume II from the person who sold it to me. Otherwise the T.A. Heppenheimer books are always complete and accurate. I can tell you his "Countdown: A History of Space Flight" was one of the best. My volume II of this book seems well researched and impressive.
Wnex
I wish I could say I read this book, however I received Volume II from the person who sold it to me. Otherwise the T.A. Heppenheimer books are always complete and accurate. I can tell you his "Countdown: A History of Space Flight" was one of the best. My volume II of this book seems well researched and impressive.