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Ic Timer Handbook...With 100 Projects & Experiments epub download

by Joseph J. Carr


Op-Amp timers 15 Alarm Projects 16 Some more projects 17 And still more projects Appendix A Universal experimenter's power supply Appendix B Interfacing timerĀ .

Op-Amp timers 15 Alarm Projects 16 Some more projects 17 And still more projects Appendix A Universal experimenter's power supply Appendix B Interfacing timer ICs with High-power loads Appendix C Resistors and capacitors Index. First let me say I had concerns about the relevance of this book given its 1981 publication date, and while some things like the Power Race 102 breadboard and the XR-2240 appear to be long gone, most of the concepts and information within still applies today.

Op-Amp timers 15 Alarm Projects 16 Some more projects 17 And still more projects Appendix A Universal experimenter's power supply Appendix B Interfacing timerĀ .

Book by Carr, Joseph . Master handbook of microprocessor chips EAN 9780830612994. Contact us. We dont sell nor produce nor supply.

Book by Carr, Joseph J. Related Products.

ISBN13:9780830612901. Release Date:January 1981.

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With 100 Projects & Experiments. Learn More at LibraryThing

With 100 Projects & Experiments. ISBN 9780830612901 (978-0-8306-1290-1) Softcover, McGraw-Hill/TAB Electronics, 1981. With 100 Projects & Experiments: ISBN 9780830612901 (978-0-8306-1290-1) Softcover, McGraw-Hill/TAB Electronics, 1981. Learn More at LibraryThing. Joseph J. carr at LibraryThing. Results page: PREV 1 2 3 NEXT.

Carr, Joseph J author. Publication Information. Blue Ridge Summit, Pa. : TAB Books. Carr, Joseph J author.

Electronic Circuit Guidebook, Volume 2: IC Timers will show you how it is done Part II presents a variety of different circuits and projects. Some of the circuits are standalone, while others are for incorporation into other circuits.

Electronic Circuit Guidebook, Volume 2: IC Timers will show you how it is done. Part I of this book is organized to demonstrate the theory of how various timers work. This is done by way of an introduction to resistor-capacitor circuits, and in-depth chapters on TTL and CMOS digital IC timers, the LM-555 and other IC devices, operational amplifier timer circuits, retriggerable timers and long duration timers. Part II presents a variety of different circuits and projects.

Book by Carr, Joseph J.

Ic Timer Handbook...With 100 Projects & Experiments epub download

ISBN13: 978-0830600076

ISBN: 0830600078

Author: Joseph J. Carr

Category: Transportation

Subcategory: Engineering

Language: English

Publisher: Tab Books; 1st edition (September 1, 1981)

Pages: 308 pages

ePUB size: 1725 kb

FB2 size: 1147 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 756

Other Formats: lrf doc rtf mobi

Related to Ic Timer Handbook...With 100 Projects & Experiments ePub books

Abandoned Electrical
This review is for the IC Timer Handbook by Joseph Carr (1981, 1st edition - 2nd printing Softcover)

There is no preview at the time of this review so I will provide the chapter titles as to give you a better idea of the book contents.
1 Bipolar IC devices and operational amplifiers
2 Discreet device timers
3 Some TTL and CMOS devices
4 Basics of digital electronics
5 The 555 timer
6 Monostable operation of the 555
7 Astable operation of the 555
8 Exar XR-2240
9 XR-2240 projects
10 CMOS timer circuits
11 TTL timer circuits
12 Retriggerable timers
13 Very long duration timers
14 Op-Amp timers
15 Alarm Projects
16 Some more projects
17 And still more projects
Appendix A Universal experimenter's power supply
Appendix B Interfacing timer ICs with High-power loads
Appendix C Resistors and capacitors
Index

First let me say I had concerns about the relevance of this book given its 1981 publication date, and while some things like the Power Race 102 breadboard and the XR-2240 appear to be long gone, most of the concepts and information within still applies today.

I found the author's relaxed yet informative writing style a joy to read and the concepts presented easy to understand. But the book wasn't exactly what I expected, sure it's about IC timers but pleasantly it is really about much more.

It reviews the basics of digital electronics and gives a lot of general information about TTL and CMOS. Then it covers how to build many different types of timer circuits, in may different ways, and in the end tells you how to connect them to real world devices.

Back to the Power race 102 breadboard. For some reason the author chose to present some of the simpler circuits formatted for a proprietary breadboard, the Power Race 102. It appears the PR102 has switches, buttons, and LED permanently mounted on it. This is slightly annoying but really not that big of a deal. Not many circuits are formatted for the PR102, and the circuits that use it are so simple they are easily converted to a normal breadboard with minimal effort.

Oddly enough the book starts with amplifiers, then moves to other discrete devices, and also covers some common TTL and CMOS ICs used later on. Then it moves on to the basics of digital electronics. To me a good review is always welcome and with the foundation laid he moves on to the famous 555 timer.

The coverage of the 555 is actually why I bought this book and in my opinion it delivered as promised. He gives in clear information on how the 555 works internally, and how to use it in both Monostable and Astable setups. Unfortunately some of the errors or omissions in the book are found in the 555 chapters. On page 89 the pin7 label is omitted while pin8 is labeled 3. On page 111 some of the placeholder decimals are missing from the timing chart (1.0 and 0.1). Despite these little over-sites I found the 555 coverage to be very good and these errors may be corrected in later versions.

From here we go to the Exar EX-2240 timer and it's projects. It appears the Exar EX-2240 is long extinct but the ideas presented her are still very valid. The EX-2240 is timer IC with an on-board binary counter, so this can easily be built today from modern CMOS ICs with little trouble. The same basic idea goes for the rest of CMOS and TTL timers you will encounter in this book, the actual part may be obsolete but you should be able to find a modern equivalent without much trouble.

After you learn you get to have fun with your new knowledge in the three entire chapters of nothing but projects. Below are some (not all) of the projects in this book.

Staircase or ramp generator, analog to digital converter, digital sample and hold, programmable astable vibrator, ten minute timer, second timer, three minute timer, timer audio output circuit, binary address sequencer, programmable monostable multvibrator, low battery alarm, automatic battery charger, power failure alarm, Low light monitor, low temperature alarm, idiot lamp monitor, burglar alarm: I-II-III-IV, DC-DC converter, Dice game, temperature monitor, digital capacitance meter, continuity tester, aural continuity tester I-II, sidetone oscillator, variable pulse generator, warble siren, touch plate switches, pulse catcher, digital logic probe, oscilloscope calibrator.

It should be noted some of these projects involve mains power (wall-plug) so they should only be done by experienced people or in the case of kids under the supervision of experienced people. It is also worth mentioning the projects only include the electrical schematic, they don't have plans for the physical build.

After the projects he also provides the schematic for a universal experimenter's power supply. While the supply itself is nothing special I really like that he goes into detail about what each part in the supply does and how to pick the appropriate values for all the components. And last, a jog through how to interface ICs with high-power loads and short section on the realities of real world RC components.

Now with all the good things I said why four stars? Well, I'd probably go 4-1/2 if I could.

There are a few errors throughout the book and some are in the section that is likely most important to modern readers, the chapters on the 555. Also, the author chose to use an proprietary Powerrace 102 breadboard for some of the experiments.

So overall I liked the book and would buy it again. For reference the original cost on my softcover was $9.95. After reading it I would have happily paid the full cover price for a good used copy or a few dollars less for an average used copy.
Abandoned Electrical
This review is for the IC Timer Handbook by Joseph Carr (1981, 1st edition - 2nd printing Softcover)

There is no preview at the time of this review so I will provide the chapter titles as to give you a better idea of the book contents.
1 Bipolar IC devices and operational amplifiers
2 Discreet device timers
3 Some TTL and CMOS devices
4 Basics of digital electronics
5 The 555 timer
6 Monostable operation of the 555
7 Astable operation of the 555
8 Exar XR-2240
9 XR-2240 projects
10 CMOS timer circuits
11 TTL timer circuits
12 Retriggerable timers
13 Very long duration timers
14 Op-Amp timers
15 Alarm Projects
16 Some more projects
17 And still more projects
Appendix A Universal experimenter's power supply
Appendix B Interfacing timer ICs with High-power loads
Appendix C Resistors and capacitors
Index

First let me say I had concerns about the relevance of this book given its 1981 publication date, and while some things like the Power Race 102 breadboard and the XR-2240 appear to be long gone, most of the concepts and information within still applies today.

I found the author's relaxed yet informative writing style a joy to read and the concepts presented easy to understand. But the book wasn't exactly what I expected, sure it's about IC timers but pleasantly it is really about much more.

It reviews the basics of digital electronics and gives a lot of general information about TTL and CMOS. Then it covers how to build many different types of timer circuits, in may different ways, and in the end tells you how to connect them to real world devices.

Back to the Power race 102 breadboard. For some reason the author chose to present some of the simpler circuits formatted for a proprietary breadboard, the Power Race 102. It appears the PR102 has switches, buttons, and LED permanently mounted on it. This is slightly annoying but really not that big of a deal. Not many circuits are formatted for the PR102, and the circuits that use it are so simple they are easily converted to a normal breadboard with minimal effort.

Oddly enough the book starts with amplifiers, then moves to other discrete devices, and also covers some common TTL and CMOS ICs used later on. Then it moves on to the basics of digital electronics. To me a good review is always welcome and with the foundation laid he moves on to the famous 555 timer.

The coverage of the 555 is actually why I bought this book and in my opinion it delivered as promised. He gives in clear information on how the 555 works internally, and how to use it in both Monostable and Astable setups. Unfortunately some of the errors or omissions in the book are found in the 555 chapters. On page 89 the pin7 label is omitted while pin8 is labeled 3. On page 111 some of the placeholder decimals are missing from the timing chart (1.0 and 0.1). Despite these little over-sites I found the 555 coverage to be very good and these errors may be corrected in later versions.

From here we go to the Exar EX-2240 timer and it's projects. It appears the Exar EX-2240 is long extinct but the ideas presented her are still very valid. The EX-2240 is timer IC with an on-board binary counter, so this can easily be built today from modern CMOS ICs with little trouble. The same basic idea goes for the rest of CMOS and TTL timers you will encounter in this book, the actual part may be obsolete but you should be able to find a modern equivalent without much trouble.

After you learn you get to have fun with your new knowledge in the three entire chapters of nothing but projects. Below are some (not all) of the projects in this book.

Staircase or ramp generator, analog to digital converter, digital sample and hold, programmable astable vibrator, ten minute timer, second timer, three minute timer, timer audio output circuit, binary address sequencer, programmable monostable multvibrator, low battery alarm, automatic battery charger, power failure alarm, Low light monitor, low temperature alarm, idiot lamp monitor, burglar alarm: I-II-III-IV, DC-DC converter, Dice game, temperature monitor, digital capacitance meter, continuity tester, aural continuity tester I-II, sidetone oscillator, variable pulse generator, warble siren, touch plate switches, pulse catcher, digital logic probe, oscilloscope calibrator.

It should be noted some of these projects involve mains power (wall-plug) so they should only be done by experienced people or in the case of kids under the supervision of experienced people. It is also worth mentioning the projects only include the electrical schematic, they don't have plans for the physical build.

After the projects he also provides the schematic for a universal experimenter's power supply. While the supply itself is nothing special I really like that he goes into detail about what each part in the supply does and how to pick the appropriate values for all the components. And last, a jog through how to interface ICs with high-power loads and short section on the realities of real world RC components.

Now with all the good things I said why four stars? Well, I'd probably go 4-1/2 if I could.

There are a few errors throughout the book and some are in the section that is likely most important to modern readers, the chapters on the 555. Also, the author chose to use an proprietary Powerrace 102 breadboard for some of the experiments.

So overall I liked the book and would buy it again. For reference the original cost on my softcover was $9.95. After reading it I would have happily paid the full cover price for a good used copy or a few dollars less for an average used copy.
Mavegar
IF YOU KNOW WHAT THIS BOOK IS FOR AND YOU DON'T HAVE IT YOU NEED IT.
JOE CARR NEVER DID A BAD BOOK
IF YOU DON'T HAVE AT LEAST ONE OF EVERYTHING HE DID YOU NEED TO FIND THE MISSING ONES AND BUY THEM

IF I EVER FOUND HARD COVERS I WOULD BUY THEM AND PASS THE PAPERBACKS ON TO OTHERS EVEN THOUGH THEY ARE CLUTTERED WITH MY POSTITS AND NOTES. BOOKS ARE TOOLS AND TOOLS SAVE TIME AND EDUCATE.
Mavegar
IF YOU KNOW WHAT THIS BOOK IS FOR AND YOU DON'T HAVE IT YOU NEED IT.
JOE CARR NEVER DID A BAD BOOK
IF YOU DON'T HAVE AT LEAST ONE OF EVERYTHING HE DID YOU NEED TO FIND THE MISSING ONES AND BUY THEM

IF I EVER FOUND HARD COVERS I WOULD BUY THEM AND PASS THE PAPERBACKS ON TO OTHERS EVEN THOUGH THEY ARE CLUTTERED WITH MY POSTITS AND NOTES. BOOKS ARE TOOLS AND TOOLS SAVE TIME AND EDUCATE.
iSlate
This review is for the IC Timer Handbook by Joseph Carr. My copy is the 1981, 1st edition - 2nd printing of the Softcover. This book is listed on Amazon twice, my verified purchase is on the other listing. I repeated my review here because there are no other reviews for this book at the time I posted.

There is no preview at the time of this review so I will provide the chapter titles as to give you a better idea of the book contents.
1 Bipolar IC devices and operational amplifiers
2 Discreet device timers
3 Some TTL and CMOS devices
4 Basics of digital electronics
5 The 555 timer
6 Monostable operation of the 555
7 Astable operation of the 555
8 Exar XR-2240
9 XR-2240 projects
10 CMOS timer circuits
11 TTL timer circuits
12 Retriggerable timers
13 Very long duration timers
14 Op-Amp timers
15 Alarm Projects
16 Some more projects
17 And still more projects
Appendix A Universal experimenter's power supply
Appendix B Interfacing timer ICs with High-power loads
Appendix C Resistors and capacitors
Index

First let me say I had concerns about the relevance of this book given its 1981 publication date, and while some things like the Power Race 102 breadboard and the XR-2240 appear to be long gone, most of the concepts and information within still applies today.

I found the author's relaxed yet informative writing style a joy to read and the concepts presented easy to understand. But the book wasn't exactly what I expected, sure it's about IC timers but pleasantly it is really about much more.

It reviews the basics of digital electronics and gives a lot of general information about TTL and CMOS. Then it covers how to build many different types of timer circuits, in may different ways, and in the end tells you how to connect them to real world devices.

Back to the Power race 102 breadboard. For some reason the author chose to present some of the simpler circuits formatted for a proprietary breadboard, the Power Race 102. It appears the PR102 has switches, buttons, and LED permanently mounted on it. This is slightly annoying but really not that big of a deal. Not many circuits are formatted for the PR102, and the circuits that use it are so simple they are easily converted to a normal breadboard with minimal effort.

Oddly enough the book starts with amplifiers, then moves to other discrete devices, and also covers some common TTL and CMOS ICs used later on. Then it moves on to the basics of digital electronics. To me a good review is always welcome and with the foundation laid he moves on to the famous 555 timer.

The coverage of the 555 is actually why I bought this book and in my opinion it delivered as promised. He gives in clear information on how the 555 works internally, and how to use it in both Monostable and Astable setups. Unfortunately some of the errors or omissions in the book are found in the 555 chapters. On page 89 the pin7 label is omitted while pin8 is labeled 3. On page 111 some of the placeholder decimals are missing from the timing chart (1.0 and 0.1). Despite these little over-sites I found the 555 coverage to be very good and these errors may be corrected in later versions.

From here we go to the Exar EX-2240 timer and it's projects. It appears the Exar EX-2240 is long extinct but the ideas presented her are still very valid. The EX-2240 is timer IC with an on-board binary counter, so this can easily be built today from modern CMOS ICs with little trouble. The same basic idea goes for the rest of CMOS and TTL timers you will encounter in this book, the actual part may be obsolete but you should be able to find a modern equivalent without much trouble.

After you learn you get to have fun with your new knowledge in the three entire chapters of nothing but projects. Below are some (not all) of the projects in this book.

Staircase or ramp generator, analog to digital converter, digital sample and hold, programmable astable vibrator, ten minute timer, second timer, three minute timer, timer audio output circuit, binary address sequencer, programmable monostable multvibrator, low battery alarm, automatic battery charger, power failure alarm, Low light monitor, low temperature alarm, idiot lamp monitor, burglar alarm: I-II-III-IV, DC-DC converter, Dice game, temperature monitor, digital capacitance meter, continuity tester, aural continuity tester I-II, sidetone oscillator, variable pulse generator, warble siren, touch plate switches, pulse catcher, digital logic probe, oscilloscope calibrator.

It should be noted some of these projects involve mains power (wall-plug) so they should only be done by experienced people or in the case of kids under the supervision of experienced people. It is also worth mentioning the projects only include the electrical schematic, they don't have plans for the physical build.

After the projects he also provides the schematic for a universal experimenter's power supply. While the supply itself is nothing special I really like that he goes into detail about what each part in the supply does and how to pick the appropriate values for all the components. And last, a jog through how to interface ICs with high-power loads and short section on the realities of real world RC components.

Now with all the good things I said why four stars? Well, I'd probably go 4-1/2 if I could.

There are a few errors throughout the book and some are in the section that is likely most important to modern readers, the chapters on the 555. Also, the author chose to use an proprietary Powerrace 102 breadboard for some of the experiments.

So overall I liked the book and would buy it again. For reference the original cost on my softcover was $9.95. After reading it I would have happily paid the full cover price for a good used copy or a few dollars less for an average used copy.
iSlate
This review is for the IC Timer Handbook by Joseph Carr. My copy is the 1981, 1st edition - 2nd printing of the Softcover. This book is listed on Amazon twice, my verified purchase is on the other listing. I repeated my review here because there are no other reviews for this book at the time I posted.

There is no preview at the time of this review so I will provide the chapter titles as to give you a better idea of the book contents.
1 Bipolar IC devices and operational amplifiers
2 Discreet device timers
3 Some TTL and CMOS devices
4 Basics of digital electronics
5 The 555 timer
6 Monostable operation of the 555
7 Astable operation of the 555
8 Exar XR-2240
9 XR-2240 projects
10 CMOS timer circuits
11 TTL timer circuits
12 Retriggerable timers
13 Very long duration timers
14 Op-Amp timers
15 Alarm Projects
16 Some more projects
17 And still more projects
Appendix A Universal experimenter's power supply
Appendix B Interfacing timer ICs with High-power loads
Appendix C Resistors and capacitors
Index

First let me say I had concerns about the relevance of this book given its 1981 publication date, and while some things like the Power Race 102 breadboard and the XR-2240 appear to be long gone, most of the concepts and information within still applies today.

I found the author's relaxed yet informative writing style a joy to read and the concepts presented easy to understand. But the book wasn't exactly what I expected, sure it's about IC timers but pleasantly it is really about much more.

It reviews the basics of digital electronics and gives a lot of general information about TTL and CMOS. Then it covers how to build many different types of timer circuits, in may different ways, and in the end tells you how to connect them to real world devices.

Back to the Power race 102 breadboard. For some reason the author chose to present some of the simpler circuits formatted for a proprietary breadboard, the Power Race 102. It appears the PR102 has switches, buttons, and LED permanently mounted on it. This is slightly annoying but really not that big of a deal. Not many circuits are formatted for the PR102, and the circuits that use it are so simple they are easily converted to a normal breadboard with minimal effort.

Oddly enough the book starts with amplifiers, then moves to other discrete devices, and also covers some common TTL and CMOS ICs used later on. Then it moves on to the basics of digital electronics. To me a good review is always welcome and with the foundation laid he moves on to the famous 555 timer.

The coverage of the 555 is actually why I bought this book and in my opinion it delivered as promised. He gives in clear information on how the 555 works internally, and how to use it in both Monostable and Astable setups. Unfortunately some of the errors or omissions in the book are found in the 555 chapters. On page 89 the pin7 label is omitted while pin8 is labeled 3. On page 111 some of the placeholder decimals are missing from the timing chart (1.0 and 0.1). Despite these little over-sites I found the 555 coverage to be very good and these errors may be corrected in later versions.

From here we go to the Exar EX-2240 timer and it's projects. It appears the Exar EX-2240 is long extinct but the ideas presented her are still very valid. The EX-2240 is timer IC with an on-board binary counter, so this can easily be built today from modern CMOS ICs with little trouble. The same basic idea goes for the rest of CMOS and TTL timers you will encounter in this book, the actual part may be obsolete but you should be able to find a modern equivalent without much trouble.

After you learn you get to have fun with your new knowledge in the three entire chapters of nothing but projects. Below are some (not all) of the projects in this book.

Staircase or ramp generator, analog to digital converter, digital sample and hold, programmable astable vibrator, ten minute timer, second timer, three minute timer, timer audio output circuit, binary address sequencer, programmable monostable multvibrator, low battery alarm, automatic battery charger, power failure alarm, Low light monitor, low temperature alarm, idiot lamp monitor, burglar alarm: I-II-III-IV, DC-DC converter, Dice game, temperature monitor, digital capacitance meter, continuity tester, aural continuity tester I-II, sidetone oscillator, variable pulse generator, warble siren, touch plate switches, pulse catcher, digital logic probe, oscilloscope calibrator.

It should be noted some of these projects involve mains power (wall-plug) so they should only be done by experienced people or in the case of kids under the supervision of experienced people. It is also worth mentioning the projects only include the electrical schematic, they don't have plans for the physical build.

After the projects he also provides the schematic for a universal experimenter's power supply. While the supply itself is nothing special I really like that he goes into detail about what each part in the supply does and how to pick the appropriate values for all the components. And last, a jog through how to interface ICs with high-power loads and short section on the realities of real world RC components.

Now with all the good things I said why four stars? Well, I'd probably go 4-1/2 if I could.

There are a few errors throughout the book and some are in the section that is likely most important to modern readers, the chapters on the 555. Also, the author chose to use an proprietary Powerrace 102 breadboard for some of the experiments.

So overall I liked the book and would buy it again. For reference the original cost on my softcover was $9.95. After reading it I would have happily paid the full cover price for a good used copy or a few dollars less for an average used copy.