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The Mill on the Floss (Cambridge Literature) epub download

by George Eliot,Lib Taylor


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The Mill on the Floss (Cambridge Literature). 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove The Mill on the Floss (Cambridge Literature) from your list? The Mill on the Floss (Cambridge Literature). Published August 13, 1996 by Cambridge University Press.

Dorlcote Mill was on the River Floss. The mill was a mile from the town of St Ogg’s. Edward Tulliver was the miller. When Tom arrived, a boy with a sad face was standing in the library. The boy was thin and he had a twisted back. He was two years older than Tom. He lived in the house next to the mill. The miller and his wife, Bessy Tulliver, had two children – a boy, Tom, and a girl, Maggie.

Home George Eliot The Mill on the Floss. Philip, too, caught a glimpse of her now andthen round the open book on the desk, and felt that he had neverbefore seen her under so strong an influence. The mill on the floss, . 6. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57. Chapter VII. Philip Re-enters. More, more!" said Lucy, when the duet had been encored. Somethingspirited again. Mr. Carr was none of our blood,nor noways connected with us, as I've ever heared. 3. Sister Glegg," said Mrs. Pullet, in a pleading tone, drawing on hergloves again, and stroking the fingers in an agitated manner, "ifyou've got anything disrespectful to say o' Mr. Carr, I do beg of youas you won't say it to me. I know what he was," she added, with asigh; "his breath was short to that degree as you could hear him tworooms of.

Chapter I Outside Dorlcote Mill. A wide plain, where the broadening Floss hurries on between its green banks to the sea, and the loving tide, rushing to meet it, checks its passage with an impetuous embrace. A wide plain, where the broadening Floss hurries on between its green banks to the sea, and the loving tide, rushing to meet it, checks its passage with an impetuous embrace

George Eliot: Selected full-text books and articles. George Eliot and the British Empire By Nancy Henry Cambridge University Press, 2002.

George Eliot: Selected full-text books and articles. George Eliot By Jan JęDrzejewski Routledge, 2007. George Eliot: A Biography By Blanche Colton Williams Macmillan, 1936. Librarian's tip: This includes Adam Bede, The Mill on the Floss, Silas Marner, and Romola. A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. George Eliot and the Fetish of Realism By Logan, Peter Melville Studies in the Literary Imagination, Vol. 35, No. 2, Fall 2002.

As the author of The Mill on the Floss and Middlemarch, George Eliot was one of the most admired novelists of the Victorian period, and she remains a central figure in the literary canon today. She was the first woman to take on the kind of political and philosophical fiction that had previously been a male preserve, combining rigorous intellectual ideas with a sensitive understanding of human relationships and making her one of the most important writers of the nineteenth century

While scholars and students admire George Eliot’s Middlemarch . A complicated book that doesn’t let the reader or its characters off easy, The Mill on th. .

While scholars and students admire George Eliot’s Middlemarch, readers fall in love with The Mill on the Floss. In its main character, the rebellious Maggie Tulliver, Eliot created one of her greatest voices and a precursor to all of the misunderstood youths to follow in the literary canon. A complicated book that doesn’t let the reader or its characters off easy, The Mill on the Floss deceives with what, for Eliot at least, seems a straightforward narrative.

The Mill on the Floss. Literature and Medicine in Nineteenth-Century Britain: From Mary Shelley to George Eliot (Cambridge Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture). Janis McLarren Caldwell. 457 Kb. Silas Marner. Eliot George, Hughes Holly. 0 Mb. The Oxford Reader's Companion to George Eliot.

The Mill on the Floss is a novel by George Eliot (Mary Ann Evans), first published in three volumes in 1860 by William Blackwood. Spanning a period of 10 to 15 years, the novel details the lives of Tom and Maggie Tulliver, siblings growing up at Dorlcote Mill on the River Floss.

Cambridge Literature is a series of literary texts edited for study by students aged 14-18 in English-speaking classrooms. It will include novels, poetry, plays, short stories, essays, travel-writing and other non-fiction. The series will be extensive and open-ended, and will provide school students with a range of edited texts taken from a wide geographical spread. It will include writing in English from various genres and differing times. The Mill on the Floss by Helen Edmundson is edited by Lib Taylor, Department of Film and Drama, University of Reading.

The Mill on the Floss (Cambridge Literature) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0521566780

ISBN: 0521566789

Author: George Eliot,Lib Taylor

Category: Teaching and Education

Subcategory: Schools & Teaching

Language: English

Publisher: Cambridge University Press (August 13, 1996)

Pages: 142 pages

ePUB size: 1344 kb

FB2 size: 1394 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 143

Other Formats: mobi lit docx lrf

Related to The Mill on the Floss (Cambridge Literature) ePub books

Jorius
I first read The Mill on the Floss when I was 17 years old. I couldn’t put it down - read for 14 hours straight. However, many years later, I did not remember much about the book at all, only that I loved it. Now, after all these years, I see why.

George Eliot is better at describing our innermost thoughts and feelings than any author I have ever read. Why do we read books? A good story is always entertaining, but more importantly, I think we read to gain new insights and to hear our own insights expressed more succinctly and beautifully than we could ever imagine doing ourselves.

The Mill on the Floss starts off almost as a comedy, her dry wit, at least for me, is laugh out loud funny at times. It becomes increasingly more serious in tone and story line until the amazing ending.

Take your time when you read Eliot (if you can). Savor every exquisite word and insight. Her gift in writing about the human condition was unparalleled.
Jorius
I first read The Mill on the Floss when I was 17 years old. I couldn’t put it down - read for 14 hours straight. However, many years later, I did not remember much about the book at all, only that I loved it. Now, after all these years, I see why.

George Eliot is better at describing our innermost thoughts and feelings than any author I have ever read. Why do we read books? A good story is always entertaining, but more importantly, I think we read to gain new insights and to hear our own insights expressed more succinctly and beautifully than we could ever imagine doing ourselves.

The Mill on the Floss starts off almost as a comedy, her dry wit, at least for me, is laugh out loud funny at times. It becomes increasingly more serious in tone and story line until the amazing ending.

Take your time when you read Eliot (if you can). Savor every exquisite word and insight. Her gift in writing about the human condition was unparalleled.
Kelerius
I am a very good customer of Amazon's. At any one time, I can buy tons of books. To paraphrase an old saying, my eyes are bigger than my time in which to read. Therefore, I have developed a strict buying pattern: All purchases must contain one contemporary book on any subject, one book from a list of some sort and one book considered literature. For unexplained reasons, I expected "The Mill on the Floss" to be well written but ponderous. This erroneous expectation was reinforced by the size of the book, 600 pages. Since I had bought it, I decided to soldier on despite the fact that it would undoubtedly be dull.

Was I surprised. Not only was the book a quick-read, it was fun, exciting and thoroughly different from many other Victorian love stories I have read. Maggie, our heroine, was as plucky, smart and beautiful as one would expect. However, be that as it may, Elliot surrounds her with multi-leveled characters. Even those who are merely extras meant to move the plot or explain society's attitudes have depth. While they are meant as background, still they think and act surprisingly. One could describe them as 3D wallpaper.

I was unable to predict the paths the plot would take. While I love Jane Austen and the Bronte sisters, in their books a reader knows who will come to a bad end, who will take the high road, and which characters will end up as a couple at the end of the book. Not so in this novel. Moreover, Elliot's ideas are shockingly modern. Perhaps I should not have used that adjective because not only were the author's books considered shocking in her day, Elliot, herself, shocked the society in which she lived. In addition to the fact that she took a man's name so that her books would sell, she lived for years with a married man. Her life "in sin" lead to an estrangement with her brother. Therefore, it should come as no surprise that her thoughts on relationships would fit in with the morality of today. I was lucky enough to have an introduction which informed me that "The Mill on the Floss" was more than a little autobiographical. Hence, the intensity of love Maggie feels for a variety of people rings very true.

Other reviewers have talked about the plot so there is no need for me to venture in that direction. This book contains sadness and happiness, desperation and triumph, cruelty and kindness. Of course, there is love of all kinds, romantic, parental and filial. Even love between friends is explored. The books ends with action. I held my breath while reading this section, felt sad when things went badly for Maggie and was overjoyed when something good happened to her.

Quite simply, it is a very good read. I found one problem: I rarely reread a book. However, I enjoyed this book so much that I am hungry for not only those books of Elliot's I have never opened but also "Middlemarch", which I read years ago. This time my hungry eyes lead me to a feast. I'm glad I took the time to consume it.
Kelerius
I am a very good customer of Amazon's. At any one time, I can buy tons of books. To paraphrase an old saying, my eyes are bigger than my time in which to read. Therefore, I have developed a strict buying pattern: All purchases must contain one contemporary book on any subject, one book from a list of some sort and one book considered literature. For unexplained reasons, I expected "The Mill on the Floss" to be well written but ponderous. This erroneous expectation was reinforced by the size of the book, 600 pages. Since I had bought it, I decided to soldier on despite the fact that it would undoubtedly be dull.

Was I surprised. Not only was the book a quick-read, it was fun, exciting and thoroughly different from many other Victorian love stories I have read. Maggie, our heroine, was as plucky, smart and beautiful as one would expect. However, be that as it may, Elliot surrounds her with multi-leveled characters. Even those who are merely extras meant to move the plot or explain society's attitudes have depth. While they are meant as background, still they think and act surprisingly. One could describe them as 3D wallpaper.

I was unable to predict the paths the plot would take. While I love Jane Austen and the Bronte sisters, in their books a reader knows who will come to a bad end, who will take the high road, and which characters will end up as a couple at the end of the book. Not so in this novel. Moreover, Elliot's ideas are shockingly modern. Perhaps I should not have used that adjective because not only were the author's books considered shocking in her day, Elliot, herself, shocked the society in which she lived. In addition to the fact that she took a man's name so that her books would sell, she lived for years with a married man. Her life "in sin" lead to an estrangement with her brother. Therefore, it should come as no surprise that her thoughts on relationships would fit in with the morality of today. I was lucky enough to have an introduction which informed me that "The Mill on the Floss" was more than a little autobiographical. Hence, the intensity of love Maggie feels for a variety of people rings very true.

Other reviewers have talked about the plot so there is no need for me to venture in that direction. This book contains sadness and happiness, desperation and triumph, cruelty and kindness. Of course, there is love of all kinds, romantic, parental and filial. Even love between friends is explored. The books ends with action. I held my breath while reading this section, felt sad when things went badly for Maggie and was overjoyed when something good happened to her.

Quite simply, it is a very good read. I found one problem: I rarely reread a book. However, I enjoyed this book so much that I am hungry for not only those books of Elliot's I have never opened but also "Middlemarch", which I read years ago. This time my hungry eyes lead me to a feast. I'm glad I took the time to consume it.
Iaiastta
While scholars and students admire George Eliot’s “Middlemarch,” readers fall in love with “The Mill on the Floss.” Yes, the former is perhaps the greatest English-language novel ever written, but it’s the latter we return to for strength and inspiration. In its main character, the rebellious Maggie Tulliver, Eliot created one of her greatest voices and a precursor to all of the misunderstood youths to follow in the literary canon.

The novel traces Maggie’s growth from childhood to young adulthood and her “yearning for something that would … give her a sense of home.” This journey leads Maggie to a series of hard choices that set her individual desires against family, honor, tradition and small-town English values, or what Eliot calls the “dead level of provincial existence.” It all comes to a flashpoint when Maggie falls in love with the one boy no one wants to see her with.

In contrast to Maggie is her brother, Tom, a boy who “was particularly clear and positive on one point – namely, that he would punish everybody who deserved it.” The siblings' complex relationship lies at the heart of the novel, even more so than Maggie’s love affair. Tom’s unrelenting and self-righteous focus eventually turns its attention to Maggie, with tragic results.

A complicated book that doesn’t let the reader or its characters off easy, “The Mill on the Floss” deceives with what, for Eliot at least, seems a straightforward narrative. (To be sure, the book features about half-a-dozen important players, each with a story of his or her own, but it’s nowhere as involved as “Middlemarch.”) The challenge comes in reconciling Eliot’s take on Maggie’s struggle toward self-realization in the face of societal pressures – or what Eliot sums up as “the great problem of the shifting relation between passion and duty” – with our own, 21st-century “selfie” perspective that values individuality above all else. Even though this is one of literature’s great stories of a woman finding her true voice, “The Mill on the Floss” seems, ultimately, to say that comes with a heavy price that may not be worth paying.

That’s heavy stuff. Nonetheless, if you’re looking to tackle Eliot’s works, this makes the perfect introduction, along with “Silas Marner," before graduating to "Middlemarch." Both capture the essence of Eliot’s style and vision in quick, easy reads. Unlike, say, Eliot’s contemporary William Makepeace Thackeray, whose pen dripped with sarcasm and at times outright disdain for his characters, Eliot loves her creations – even when they make stupid choices – and writes from a self-confessed “strong sympathy” for them. As a result, the reader cares for Eliot’s creations. Maggie and Tom Tulliver will haunt you long after you’ve finished reading this novel.
Iaiastta
While scholars and students admire George Eliot’s “Middlemarch,” readers fall in love with “The Mill on the Floss.” Yes, the former is perhaps the greatest English-language novel ever written, but it’s the latter we return to for strength and inspiration. In its main character, the rebellious Maggie Tulliver, Eliot created one of her greatest voices and a precursor to all of the misunderstood youths to follow in the literary canon.

The novel traces Maggie’s growth from childhood to young adulthood and her “yearning for something that would … give her a sense of home.” This journey leads Maggie to a series of hard choices that set her individual desires against family, honor, tradition and small-town English values, or what Eliot calls the “dead level of provincial existence.” It all comes to a flashpoint when Maggie falls in love with the one boy no one wants to see her with.

In contrast to Maggie is her brother, Tom, a boy who “was particularly clear and positive on one point – namely, that he would punish everybody who deserved it.” The siblings' complex relationship lies at the heart of the novel, even more so than Maggie’s love affair. Tom’s unrelenting and self-righteous focus eventually turns its attention to Maggie, with tragic results.

A complicated book that doesn’t let the reader or its characters off easy, “The Mill on the Floss” deceives with what, for Eliot at least, seems a straightforward narrative. (To be sure, the book features about half-a-dozen important players, each with a story of his or her own, but it’s nowhere as involved as “Middlemarch.”) The challenge comes in reconciling Eliot’s take on Maggie’s struggle toward self-realization in the face of societal pressures – or what Eliot sums up as “the great problem of the shifting relation between passion and duty” – with our own, 21st-century “selfie” perspective that values individuality above all else. Even though this is one of literature’s great stories of a woman finding her true voice, “The Mill on the Floss” seems, ultimately, to say that comes with a heavy price that may not be worth paying.

That’s heavy stuff. Nonetheless, if you’re looking to tackle Eliot’s works, this makes the perfect introduction, along with “Silas Marner," before graduating to "Middlemarch." Both capture the essence of Eliot’s style and vision in quick, easy reads. Unlike, say, Eliot’s contemporary William Makepeace Thackeray, whose pen dripped with sarcasm and at times outright disdain for his characters, Eliot loves her creations – even when they make stupid choices – and writes from a self-confessed “strong sympathy” for them. As a result, the reader cares for Eliot’s creations. Maggie and Tom Tulliver will haunt you long after you’ve finished reading this novel.