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Hard Truths: Uncovering the Deep Structure of Schooling epub download

by Barbara Benham Tye


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Barbara Benham Tye. This work scrutinizes the forces which work overtime to pull innovative projects, programmes and processes back to more traditional . Summary and Conclusion. 1. Defining the Deep Structure of Schooling. This work scrutinizes the forces which work overtime to pull innovative projects, programmes and processes back to more traditional territories that are familiar to most Americans. 12. The Evolution of What Americans Take for Granted about Their Schools. Events and Ideas That Shaped the Deep Structure of the Late 20th Century. Recognizing the Deep StructureVariations on a Theme.

Hard Truths: Uncovering the Deep Structure of Schooling.

This deep structure is composed of the elements that we understand as schooling

The Schooling of Carolyn. Composition, Deep Structure and Evolution of Continents.

The Schooling of Carolyn. This Page Intentionally Left Blank This Page Intentionally Left Blank LITHOS ELSEVIER Lithos48 1999 vii Contents. The Book of Ultimate Truths. eBooks are not transferable.

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By this, she means the cultural aspects of schooling in America that she argues are impossible to change for any extended period of time unless there are societal changes in the expectations and role of schools.

These values and assumptions are shaped by conventional wisdom, tradition, vested interests, and institutional inertia. Americans expect similarities in classrooms, policies, programs, pedagogy, resource allocation, measures of success, and the labeling of students

Uncovering the Deep Structure of Schooling. by Barbara Benham Tye. Published March 2000 by Teachers College Press. There's no description for this book yet.

Uncovering the Deep Structure of Schooling.

Find nearly any book by Barbara Benham Tye. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Hard Truths: Uncovering the Deep Structure of Schooling: ISBN 9780807739334 (978-0-8077-3933-4) Softcover, Teachers College Press, 2000. Multiple Realities: A Study of 13 American High Schools.

This work scrutinizes the forces which work overtime to pull innovative projects, programmes and processes back to more traditional territories that are familiar to most Americans.

Hard Truths: Uncovering the Deep Structure of Schooling epub download

ISBN13: 978-0807739334

ISBN: 0807739332

Author: Barbara Benham Tye

Category: Teaching and Education

Subcategory: Schools & Teaching

Language: English

Publisher: Teachers College Press (March 1, 2000)

Pages: 204 pages

ePUB size: 1238 kb

FB2 size: 1859 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 743

Other Formats: lrf lrf rtf mobi

Related to Hard Truths: Uncovering the Deep Structure of Schooling ePub books

Trash
In this book, Barbara Benham Tye makes a strong case for her premise that most school reform efforts fail because they do not take into account the virtually insurmountable inhibiting factor she calls the deep structure. This deep structure is composed of the elements that we understand as schooling. "A composite of widely held beliefs about what schools are for and how they should function" (p. 23), the deep structure may be understood as a society's conventional wisdom about schooling, "coupled with a number of inhibiting forces that actively seek to prevent change in how schools are put together and work" (p. 23), including the bureaucratic nature of the school system, how it is financed, and teachers' responses to reforms. Extremely resistant to change, the deep structure is the force continuously working to maintain the status quo. Only when a reform is compatible with changing societal expectations is it likely to succeed. Which leads Tye to wonder, "what, then, makes it a `reform'?" Rather than a reform, the author proposes that a successful change ought to be seen as an accommodation by the deep structure.
As a future public school teacher, I found Tye's diagnosis both enlightening and discouraging. I have observed the pendulum swing of reform movements, with none ever seeming to last terribly long, yet I had not considered the underlying structure as the primary cause. The existence of this resistant underpinning leads one to wonder what can be done. At the same time, though, Tye's revelation of the deep structure is also reassuring. If I am unable to make significant changes in teaching methodology or curriculum due to the deep structure, I can save the time, energy, and resources I would have expended in a futile effort to spend on activities that have a greater likelihood of succeeding, such as making changes at my school that take into account "the particular configuration of characteristics that give that school its distinctive identity" (p. 155).
Tye writes in a style that is enjoyable and easy to read and understand. She blends first-person experiences with extensive references to other sources in support of her thesis. I would highly recommend this book to anyone with an interest in education, especially those directly involved with school reform efforts.
Trash
In this book, Barbara Benham Tye makes a strong case for her premise that most school reform efforts fail because they do not take into account the virtually insurmountable inhibiting factor she calls the deep structure. This deep structure is composed of the elements that we understand as schooling. "A composite of widely held beliefs about what schools are for and how they should function" (p. 23), the deep structure may be understood as a society's conventional wisdom about schooling, "coupled with a number of inhibiting forces that actively seek to prevent change in how schools are put together and work" (p. 23), including the bureaucratic nature of the school system, how it is financed, and teachers' responses to reforms. Extremely resistant to change, the deep structure is the force continuously working to maintain the status quo. Only when a reform is compatible with changing societal expectations is it likely to succeed. Which leads Tye to wonder, "what, then, makes it a `reform'?" Rather than a reform, the author proposes that a successful change ought to be seen as an accommodation by the deep structure.
As a future public school teacher, I found Tye's diagnosis both enlightening and discouraging. I have observed the pendulum swing of reform movements, with none ever seeming to last terribly long, yet I had not considered the underlying structure as the primary cause. The existence of this resistant underpinning leads one to wonder what can be done. At the same time, though, Tye's revelation of the deep structure is also reassuring. If I am unable to make significant changes in teaching methodology or curriculum due to the deep structure, I can save the time, energy, and resources I would have expended in a futile effort to spend on activities that have a greater likelihood of succeeding, such as making changes at my school that take into account "the particular configuration of characteristics that give that school its distinctive identity" (p. 155).
Tye writes in a style that is enjoyable and easy to read and understand. She blends first-person experiences with extensive references to other sources in support of her thesis. I would highly recommend this book to anyone with an interest in education, especially those directly involved with school reform efforts.
Malaunitly
Hard Truths is a long over due realization of American education. Any educator would enjoy reading the text even if you don't necessarily agree with B.B. Tye. The author has a great understanding of education from a teachers perspective and a knowledge of what truly happens behind school doors. The authors pure yet simple manner of explaining what is wrong with education in America is relaxed yet to the point and with strong convection. The author provides the reader a sense of understanding of where we have been, where we are and what we need to do to produce a real change in education that will be meaningful. I strongly reccommend this text for all teachers both young and old to read and digest for their own personal gain, knowledge, and understanding of what American education is, how it came about and why we don't see much real change in the educational setting.
Malaunitly
Hard Truths is a long over due realization of American education. Any educator would enjoy reading the text even if you don't necessarily agree with B.B. Tye. The author has a great understanding of education from a teachers perspective and a knowledge of what truly happens behind school doors. The authors pure yet simple manner of explaining what is wrong with education in America is relaxed yet to the point and with strong convection. The author provides the reader a sense of understanding of where we have been, where we are and what we need to do to produce a real change in education that will be meaningful. I strongly reccommend this text for all teachers both young and old to read and digest for their own personal gain, knowledge, and understanding of what American education is, how it came about and why we don't see much real change in the educational setting.