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Tibet's Secret Mountain: The Triump of Sepu Kangri epub download

by Chris Bonington,Charles Clarke


But such is the mountain range in Tibet that Chris Bonington and Charles Clarke and their team explored. Devotees of fine travel writing, of Tibet or of mountain climbing will relish this captivating report.

But such is the mountain range in Tibet that Chris Bonington and Charles Clarke and their team explored. Comparable in length to the entire Swiss Alps, Tibet's central mountain range, called Nyenchen Tanglha, is virtually unknown to Western climbers and travelers. At the age of 60, Bonington, preeminent British mountaineer and prolific author, resolved to climb majestic, never-before-scaled, 22,800-foot Sepu Kangri ("White Snow God").

Tibet's Secret Mountain, the Triumph of Sepu Kangri (with Dr Charles Clarke) (Weidenfeld & Nicolson) 1999. Boundless Horizons (Weidenfeld & Nicolson) 2000. Chris Bonington's Everest (Weidenfeld & Nicolson) 2002. Chris Bonington's Lakeland Heritage (with Roly Smith) (Halsgrove) 2004. Chris Bonington Mountaineer (Vertebrate Publishing) 2016.

The highest peak, the Sepu Kangri, is 22,802 feet high. In place of maps, Bonington and Clarke had to ask the way to "the Great Snow Mountain by the Sacred Lake. Includes bibliographical references (pages 244-245).

Tibet's Secret Mountain book. But such is the mountain range in Tibet that Chris Bonington and Charles Clarke and their team explored

Tibet's Secret Mountain book. But such is the mountain range in Tibet that Chris Bonington and Charles Clarke and their team explored. Its highest peak, Sepu Kangri, is 22,802 ft. In the last decade of the twentieth century it is almost unbelievable that a mountain range of length comparable to the entire Nepal Himalaya should still remain a vague notion to the geographers and exploratory mountaineers.

The authors describe their attempt to reach the peak of Sepu Kangri, a daunting mountain deep in central Tibet.

Publisher: Phoenix ISBN 13: 9780753810002.

Slight Creasing To Spine and Wear To Edges Of Pages Title: Tibet& Secret Mountain: The Triumph Of Sepu Kangri: Ascent of Sepu Kangri Item Condition: used item in a good condition. Publisher: Phoenix ISBN 13: 9780753810002. Author: Sir Chris Bonington, Charles Clarke ISBN 10: 075381000X. See all 3 pre-owned listings.

item 5 Tibet's Secret Mountain : The Triumph of Sepu Kangri By Chris Bonington, Charle -Tibet's Secret . Illustrated Hardback Books Charles Dickens for Children. Hardback 1950-1999 General & Literary Fiction Books. Charles Dickens Hardback Children's & Young Adults' Books.

item 5 Tibet's Secret Mountain : The Triumph of Sepu Kangri By Chris Bonington, Charle -Tibet's Secret Mountain : The Triumph of Sepu Kangri By Chris Bonington, Charle. item 6 Tibet's Secret Mountain: The Triumph of Sepu Kangri-Chris Bonington,Charles Cla -Tibet's Secret Mountain: The Triumph of Sepu Kangri-Chris Bonington,Charles Cla. £. 9. Illustrated Hardback Books Charles Dickens. This item doesn't belong on this page.

Tibet's Secret Mountain is more than a climbing book, however; neurologist Charles Clarke has written chapters on mountain and Tibetan medicine, the history of travel through Tibet, and his medical encounters with the people o. .

Not the best mountaineering book I've ever read, but still worth picking up. It interested me particularly because the climbing takes a back seat - it's almost a travel book. Sepu Kangri and its surroundings sound beautiful. I find it amazing that there are still places like this left to discover on Earth. ) 1 cazfrancis Jan 24, 2012.

Bibliographic Details. Title: Tibet's Secret Mountain. List this Seller's Books. Publisher: Weidenfeld & Nicolson,. Publication Date: 1999.

Told in alternating-bylined chapters-Bonington, now 65, on the climb up Sepu Kangri, and Clarke, 56, on the culture of the Tibetans who befriended the team and sought medical care from him-Tibet's Secret Mountain is a welcome throwback to the days of graceful memoirs b.

Told in alternating-bylined chapters-Bonington, now 65, on the climb up Sepu Kangri, and Clarke, 56, on the culture of the Tibetans who befriended the team and sought medical care from him-Tibet's Secret Mountain is a welcome throwback to the days of graceful memoirs by gentlemen-explorers. The 1998 team ultimately came within 150 yards of the summit before monsoon weather turned them back-but refreshingly, no one seemed to mind: "I just felt we had a magic story, of exploration, of a fabulous mountain," writes Bonington.

The authors describe their attempt to reach the peak of Sepu Kangri, a daunting mountain deep in central Tibet

Tibet's Secret Mountain: The Triump of Sepu Kangri epub download

ISBN13: 978-0297819844

ISBN: 0297819844

Author: Chris Bonington,Charles Clarke

Category: Sports and Outdoors

Subcategory: Mountaineering

Language: English

Publisher: Weidenfeld & Nicolson Ltd; TV Tie in Ed edition (February 1, 2000)

Pages: 254 pages

ePUB size: 1795 kb

FB2 size: 1943 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 595

Other Formats: docx azw mbr lit

Related to Tibet's Secret Mountain: The Triump of Sepu Kangri ePub books

Gann
By all reports Chris Bonington, one of the authors here, is a very nice man. Some say he is a good expedition organizer. He's been knighted. I think I have nearly all his books, and in some he is an extremely good writer (at least reporter). That good exposition to me revealed a less than first rate leader, but by being there almost all the time and living through the experiences, Bonington seemed a likely prospect for British plaudits. Still, my impression from his own writings, as supplemented by others (as is the structure of this particular volume), is that his climbing credentials and honors are on the one hand nearly unmatched, but on the other peculiar and somewhat dubious; yet, of course, a very nice man. Along with a pretty fair collection of first ascents for Britain in what mountaineers like to label "fine style" and "with good ethics", Bonington's lapses and crises on the slopes led to disharmony, failure, outright anarchy, untoward risk, and calamitous danger and death. I am sure Bonington regrets among others his decisions to attempt Everest by the impossibly long at-high-altitude Pinnacles route from which the now immortal Peter Boardman and Joe Tasker -- climbing without any appreciable support in circumstances where the old fashioned siege-style of "attack" may well have been warranted -- never returned. They were his friends. (Search here for the writings of either man; you will be well rewarded with works from both safely tucked in your library. Long dead, these dear souls may be at least a little resurrected by your reading of their achievements.)

Because Sir BoingBoing -- as I sarcastically reference his up-and-down performance on the mountains -- has written some near climbing classics, I wish to refer you to those others, for example: the autobiographical I CHOSE TO CLIMB; ANNAPURNA: SOUTH FACE, detailing a revolutionary ascent; EVEREST THE HARD WAY (imagine that); and even KONGUR: CHINA'S ELUSIVE SUMMIT which, like this reviewed book, deals with a lesser known mountain, appealing to me as I began to become familiar with the more popular climbing choices. What is written about Sepu Kangri -- here the so-called "secret mountain" -- demonstrates a triumph of sorts, in its own way, certainly, but still a strange title given what did and did not occur. The book unfortunately is far from Bonington's best writing, being a bit of a dash-off, really. I did enjoy the journey to and fro -- a land expedition as of old among beguiling if foreign peoples, the getting in and around the focus of the story, with almost zip about any climbing! The men involved are at best half-hearted, I'd say, about any commitment to summit.

Uncredited on the title page, Elliot Robertson's excerpted contributions stand up very well, with Charles Clarke's chapters just OK. One Victor Saunders to whom I can also give strong recommendation for his independent writings also contributed. Bonington himself, sadly, writes very poorly, and reveals himself a prig, and unrealized -- basically a jerk. The pages unfortunately mark a big downturn since Sirdom. The knighted mountaineer had his camera along, however, and although I didn't really count them, it seems about half the published photographs were his, and they are for the most part excellent.

When you tire of reading your 17th book about Everest (Bonington has several good ones -- one mentioned above), you certainly can do worse than to turn your attention this way. Try the Annapurna volume first, though, then KONGUR. Let THIS one be in your camp when the route is no more than 40 degrees, without overhangs, and lacking verglas and not too many hidden crevasses, moderate temperatures to be sure and only a whisper of wind, and your altitude should not be suffocating and your attitude simply sailing along with a marked indifference. That's the time and place for this undertaking. Then, it IS a book about mountaineering, and you won't find too much written about this peak, and the English champ and some very good men were participants, so it's redeeming value stands.
Gann
By all reports Chris Bonington, one of the authors here, is a very nice man. Some say he is a good expedition organizer. He's been knighted. I think I have nearly all his books, and in some he is an extremely good writer (at least reporter). That good exposition to me revealed a less than first rate leader, but by being there almost all the time and living through the experiences, Bonington seemed a likely prospect for British plaudits. Still, my impression from his own writings, as supplemented by others (as is the structure of this particular volume), is that his climbing credentials and honors are on the one hand nearly unmatched, but on the other peculiar and somewhat dubious; yet, of course, a very nice man. Along with a pretty fair collection of first ascents for Britain in what mountaineers like to label "fine style" and "with good ethics", Bonington's lapses and crises on the slopes led to disharmony, failure, outright anarchy, untoward risk, and calamitous danger and death. I am sure Bonington regrets among others his decisions to attempt Everest by the impossibly long at-high-altitude Pinnacles route from which the now immortal Peter Boardman and Joe Tasker -- climbing without any appreciable support in circumstances where the old fashioned siege-style of "attack" may well have been warranted -- never returned. They were his friends. (Search here for the writings of either man; you will be well rewarded with works from both safely tucked in your library. Long dead, these dear souls may be at least a little resurrected by your reading of their achievements.)

Because Sir BoingBoing -- as I sarcastically reference his up-and-down performance on the mountains -- has written some near climbing classics, I wish to refer you to those others, for example: the autobiographical I CHOSE TO CLIMB; ANNAPURNA: SOUTH FACE, detailing a revolutionary ascent; EVEREST THE HARD WAY (imagine that); and even KONGUR: CHINA'S ELUSIVE SUMMIT which, like this reviewed book, deals with a lesser known mountain, appealing to me as I began to become familiar with the more popular climbing choices. What is written about Sepu Kangri -- here the so-called "secret mountain" -- demonstrates a triumph of sorts, in its own way, certainly, but still a strange title given what did and did not occur. The book unfortunately is far from Bonington's best writing, being a bit of a dash-off, really. I did enjoy the journey to and fro -- a land expedition as of old among beguiling if foreign peoples, the getting in and around the focus of the story, with almost zip about any climbing! The men involved are at best half-hearted, I'd say, about any commitment to summit.

Uncredited on the title page, Elliot Robertson's excerpted contributions stand up very well, with Charles Clarke's chapters just OK. One Victor Saunders to whom I can also give strong recommendation for his independent writings also contributed. Bonington himself, sadly, writes very poorly, and reveals himself a prig, and unrealized -- basically a jerk. The pages unfortunately mark a big downturn since Sirdom. The knighted mountaineer had his camera along, however, and although I didn't really count them, it seems about half the published photographs were his, and they are for the most part excellent.

When you tire of reading your 17th book about Everest (Bonington has several good ones -- one mentioned above), you certainly can do worse than to turn your attention this way. Try the Annapurna volume first, though, then KONGUR. Let THIS one be in your camp when the route is no more than 40 degrees, without overhangs, and lacking verglas and not too many hidden crevasses, moderate temperatures to be sure and only a whisper of wind, and your altitude should not be suffocating and your attitude simply sailing along with a marked indifference. That's the time and place for this undertaking. Then, it IS a book about mountaineering, and you won't find too much written about this peak, and the English champ and some very good men were participants, so it's redeeming value stands.
Musical Aura Island
This book is an interesting one and the rating/value of it will totally depend on who you are and what you background is/future holds.

If you are heading off to Tibet, China, Nepal or the Himalayas for a climb (an alpine climb or trek at high altitude) this will be a 5 star book for you. It is slow, quite slow, but is interesting. If you are simply into collecting classic climb books it would be hard not to have this on your shelf.
If you just read Simpson's "Touching the Void", Viestur's "No Shortcuts to the Top", or Messner's "Free Spirit" as a non-climber I would think that these read quicker and are more riveting - but if you have a quiet weekend coming up, a nice warm cup of hot chocolate, and interest in climbing literature "Tibet's Secret Mountain" is no bore. You will read about fables of the Yak, see amazing images of the adventure, and come familiar with concerns of Bonington and Clarke as the book progresses.

So here is your rating scale: If you are passionate about climbing and/or reading about such adventures this is one for the shelf - it's a 5 star. It may be slow, like a good adventure is, but it's by no means painful. If you lack any experience on a rope and simply enjoy and adventurous read it has great history and views from these renowned climbers that will certainly increase you understandings of mountaineering, but now I would give it a 3-4 stars. I you just want an adventure, mountainside NYT bestselling style, I may be inclined to refer you to order something from Simpson or Viestur (there are many choices out there: I have linked you to two below).

Touching the Void: The True Story of One Man's Miraculous Survival Simpson - A true hit

This Game of Ghosts Simpson - a little slower, but good read

No Shortcuts to the Top: Climbing the World's 14 Highest Peaks Viestur

K2: Life and Death on the World's Most Dangerous Mountain Viestur
Musical Aura Island
This book is an interesting one and the rating/value of it will totally depend on who you are and what you background is/future holds.

If you are heading off to Tibet, China, Nepal or the Himalayas for a climb (an alpine climb or trek at high altitude) this will be a 5 star book for you. It is slow, quite slow, but is interesting. If you are simply into collecting classic climb books it would be hard not to have this on your shelf.
If you just read Simpson's "Touching the Void", Viestur's "No Shortcuts to the Top", or Messner's "Free Spirit" as a non-climber I would think that these read quicker and are more riveting - but if you have a quiet weekend coming up, a nice warm cup of hot chocolate, and interest in climbing literature "Tibet's Secret Mountain" is no bore. You will read about fables of the Yak, see amazing images of the adventure, and come familiar with concerns of Bonington and Clarke as the book progresses.

So here is your rating scale: If you are passionate about climbing and/or reading about such adventures this is one for the shelf - it's a 5 star. It may be slow, like a good adventure is, but it's by no means painful. If you lack any experience on a rope and simply enjoy and adventurous read it has great history and views from these renowned climbers that will certainly increase you understandings of mountaineering, but now I would give it a 3-4 stars. I you just want an adventure, mountainside NYT bestselling style, I may be inclined to refer you to order something from Simpson or Viestur (there are many choices out there: I have linked you to two below).

Touching the Void: The True Story of One Man's Miraculous Survival Simpson - A true hit

This Game of Ghosts Simpson - a little slower, but good read

No Shortcuts to the Top: Climbing the World's 14 Highest Peaks Viestur

K2: Life and Death on the World's Most Dangerous Mountain Viestur
Granigrinn
This book details several journeys to, and attempts to climb, Sepu Kangri. The chapters are written alternately by Bonington and Clarke, both of whom write engagingly. The alternation of voices keeps the narrative moving. However, I found the book somewhat slow, because much of it concerns the problems of Third World travel, plumbing (or lack thereof) and medicine rather than actual climbing. Readers who are non-climbers, though, may well find this lack of focus on technical mountaineering to be a plus. One certainly does get a good picture of what Tibet and its people are like today. Perhaps one of the book's best features is the lovely photography of some very striking peaks.
Granigrinn
This book details several journeys to, and attempts to climb, Sepu Kangri. The chapters are written alternately by Bonington and Clarke, both of whom write engagingly. The alternation of voices keeps the narrative moving. However, I found the book somewhat slow, because much of it concerns the problems of Third World travel, plumbing (or lack thereof) and medicine rather than actual climbing. Readers who are non-climbers, though, may well find this lack of focus on technical mountaineering to be a plus. One certainly does get a good picture of what Tibet and its people are like today. Perhaps one of the book's best features is the lovely photography of some very striking peaks.
Uaoteowi
After a slow start, where the history of the Sepu Kangri area in Tibet was discussed, the pace picked up as Clarke and Bonington described their intial reconnaissance looking for a way to the mountain and a possible climbing route. The joy of roaming across terrain, essentially unchanged for hundreds of years, comes across in the narrative. I enjoyed reading about their discoveries and meeting the local Tibetan people. The story of the climbs themselves in two different years are not as detailed as in other climbing books, but a feeling for what it was like comes across. It definitely is from a perspective of a sixty-plus year old, yet I can only hope that I am as adventurous and physically able to roam the earth's wild places as Bonington and Clarke still do. The book is similar to Bonington's other books in style. There is no fast-paced, heart stopping, climbing action; but it's a story that I could imagine myself being a part of.
Uaoteowi
After a slow start, where the history of the Sepu Kangri area in Tibet was discussed, the pace picked up as Clarke and Bonington described their intial reconnaissance looking for a way to the mountain and a possible climbing route. The joy of roaming across terrain, essentially unchanged for hundreds of years, comes across in the narrative. I enjoyed reading about their discoveries and meeting the local Tibetan people. The story of the climbs themselves in two different years are not as detailed as in other climbing books, but a feeling for what it was like comes across. It definitely is from a perspective of a sixty-plus year old, yet I can only hope that I am as adventurous and physically able to roam the earth's wild places as Bonington and Clarke still do. The book is similar to Bonington's other books in style. There is no fast-paced, heart stopping, climbing action; but it's a story that I could imagine myself being a part of.