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Lord or Legend?: Wrestling with the Jesus Dilemma epub download

by Gregory A. Boyd


Lord or Legend? book. Sounds great, yes? The Christian authors are going to look at Jesus with the same An absolutely horrible book if you are interested in historical objectivity when.

Lord or Legend? book. Sounds great, yes? The Christian authors are going to look at Jesus with the same An absolutely horrible book if you are interested in historical objectivity when most people read similar stories-stories that include reports of the supernatural-about other religious figures (Krishna, Buddha, et., they generally assume the story is largely, if not entirely, a fictitious legend. why should anyone think things are different with the story of Jesus?"

Gregory A. Boyd (PhD, Princeton Theological Seminary) is the senior pastor at Woodland Hills Church in St. Paul, Minnesota and the founder of Christus Victor Ministries. He is coauthor with Boyd of The Jesus Legend.

Gregory A. He is the author of numerous books, including Letters from a Skeptic and The Myth of a Christian Nation. He is coauthor with Eddy of The Jesus Legend. Paul Rhodes Eddy (PhD, Marquette University) is a professor of biblical and theological studies at Bethel University in St. Paul, Minnesota. Boyd (Yale University Divinity School; PhD Princeton Theological Seminary) is the Senior Pastor . In Lord or Legend? Boyd and Eddy make a case for the historical reliability of the portrait of Jesus painted by the gospels

Gregory A. Boyd (Yale University Divinity School; PhD Princeton Theological Seminary) is the Senior Pastor of Woodland Hills Church in Maplewood, Minnesota, and President of Christus Victor Ministries (ww. regboyd. He has authored and co-authored twenty books, including The Myth of a Christian Nation and The Jesus Legend (with Paul Eddy). In Lord or Legend? Boyd and Eddy make a case for the historical reliability of the portrait of Jesus painted by the gospels.

Authors Gregory A. Boyd and Paul Rhodes Eddy address pressing . Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Country: Соединенные Штаты Америки. Dewey: 23. 08 B69Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 155-169) and indexes. Subject: Иисус Христос - Историчность (Исторический Иисус), Jesus Christ - Historicity (Historical Jesus) Апологетика, Apologetics Библия - Доказательства, авторитет, Bible

Wrestling with the Jesus Dilemma. by Gregory A. Boyd and Paul Rhodes Eddy. In Lord or Legend Boyd and Eddy are not out to prove with absolute certainty that the Bible is accurate, because they understand in reality it is impossible to prove anything about the past.

Wrestling with the Jesus Dilemma. They do however, present the historical evidence that is found for Jesus as not just a man, but as Christ and also evidence for the reliability of the Bible. Though they are both pastors, they have great insight that goes beyond their faith. I think this book can help Christians and non-Christians see Jesus from a different perspective then maybe they have before. Boyd (born June 2, 1957) is an American theologian, pastor, and author. Boyd is Senior Pastor of Woodland Hills Church in St. Paul, Minnesota and President of Reknew. He is one of the leading spokesmen in the growing Neo-Anabaptism movement, which is based in the tradition of Anabaptism and advocates Christian pacifism and a non-violent understanding of God. Boyd (Yale University Divinity School; PhD Princeton Theological Seminary) is the Senior Pastor of. . Paul R. Eddy is a professor of biblical and theological studies at Bethel University in St. Paul, Minnesota, and the coauthor (with Boyd) of The Jesus Legend.

Lord or Legend?: Wrestling with the Jesus Dilemma. Gregory A. Boyd, Paul Rhodes Eddy. 7 Mb. The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs (Princeton Field Guides). Категория: Биология, Палеонтология.

This is the kind of stuff that made me on fire for Jesus, and the reason I wanted to do nothing else but be like Jesus to a.I hope you will take a look at Boyd’s book: Lord or legend?: wrestling with the Jesus dilemma.

This is the kind of stuff that made me on fire for Jesus, and the reason I wanted to do nothing else but be like Jesus to a hurting world. But that led me to study who Jesus was in history, which led me to think Christianity is false. But this, above, is still pretty awesome. Also see: Greg Boyd – More Killing for the American Jesus! Previous post: Richard Dawkins on the Demographics of Theism. Next post: Chomsky on the God of the Bible. It is really much more convincing than the Jesus movement argument! owly(Quote). Luke Muehlhauser January 4, 2011 at 6:50 am. owly

DID JESUS EVER REALLY EXIST-AND IF SO, WHO WAS HE?

Lord or Legend?: Wrestling with the Jesus Dilemma epub download

ISBN13: 978-1608999545

ISBN: 1608999548

Author: Gregory A. Boyd

Category: Spirituality and spirituality

Language: English

Publisher: Wipf & Stock Pub; Reissue edition (October 1, 2010)

Pages: 184 pages

ePUB size: 1934 kb

FB2 size: 1828 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 287

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Related to Lord or Legend?: Wrestling with the Jesus Dilemma ePub books

Dont_Wory
Boyd is a Christian apologist and offers some plausible arguments for taking the Gospel accounts as at least partially based on historical truth. The book is not intended to develop a proper scholarly proof, but more as a counterpoint to scholars who dispose of the gospel accounts as pure fiction and mythology. It should be seen as an introductory discussion of the question and not the definitive scholarly development of Boyd's thesis.
Dont_Wory
Boyd is a Christian apologist and offers some plausible arguments for taking the Gospel accounts as at least partially based on historical truth. The book is not intended to develop a proper scholarly proof, but more as a counterpoint to scholars who dispose of the gospel accounts as pure fiction and mythology. It should be seen as an introductory discussion of the question and not the definitive scholarly development of Boyd's thesis.
Coiwield
Boyd and Eddy did a superb job foraging in the ivory towers of academia and making the very lofty subject of the historical Jesus a much easier (and shorter!) beast to tackle. This book is a great start for people interested in the topic, as it takes many of the popular arguments for and against the historical reliability of Christ, and discusses them in brief, laconic and understandable ways. Boyd and Eddy get to the point as there is no fluff and needless simile; just very straightforward exp...more Boyd and Eddy did a superb job foraging in the ivory towers of academia and making the very lofty subject of the historical Jesus a much easier (and shorter!) beast to tackle. This book is a great start for people interested in the topic, as it takes many of the popular arguments for and against the historical reliability of Christ, and discusses them in brief, laconic and understandable ways. Boyd and Eddy get to the point as there is no fluff and needless simile; just very straightforward explanations. Obviously, the book is a clear defense for the historical Jesus, but does this in very honest and fair ways.

Boyd and Eddy say that this book is for the critically-minded layperson. However, even such people might find this book to be somewhat of a brain bender. I would still recommend it to anyone interested in the subject as it's a relatively short read.
Coiwield
Boyd and Eddy did a superb job foraging in the ivory towers of academia and making the very lofty subject of the historical Jesus a much easier (and shorter!) beast to tackle. This book is a great start for people interested in the topic, as it takes many of the popular arguments for and against the historical reliability of Christ, and discusses them in brief, laconic and understandable ways. Boyd and Eddy get to the point as there is no fluff and needless simile; just very straightforward exp...more Boyd and Eddy did a superb job foraging in the ivory towers of academia and making the very lofty subject of the historical Jesus a much easier (and shorter!) beast to tackle. This book is a great start for people interested in the topic, as it takes many of the popular arguments for and against the historical reliability of Christ, and discusses them in brief, laconic and understandable ways. Boyd and Eddy get to the point as there is no fluff and needless simile; just very straightforward explanations. Obviously, the book is a clear defense for the historical Jesus, but does this in very honest and fair ways.

Boyd and Eddy say that this book is for the critically-minded layperson. However, even such people might find this book to be somewhat of a brain bender. I would still recommend it to anyone interested in the subject as it's a relatively short read.
Moogugore
Arrived in great condition. Also a great book
Moogugore
Arrived in great condition. Also a great book
Lanionge
The first couple books I read about the historical Jesus were the popular ones by Lee Strobel and Josh McDowell, The Case for Christ and More Than a Carpenter. I find those books are both good but with certain flaws, particularly important points that they jump over without much detail. I later read Craig Blomberg's academic treatise The Historical Reliability of the Gospels, which is thorough but perhaps too detailed for some. "Lord or Legend" splits the differences, giving a concise treatment in under 200 pages that nonetheless tackles all the major issues swirling around the topic in recent years. It is also simply more up-to-date than Strobel and McDowell.

The first half tackles approaches to Bible scholarship. One major theme that Strobel and McDowell never touch is the reliability of oral transmission. No one knows exactly when the gospels were written, though we give 70 A.D. as the date that "most scholars agree on". But could the sayings and doings of Jesus have been recorded that long after his death? In fact, scholars have studied the transmission of sayings through oral tradition and found that they remain reliable for much longer periods than that. Boyd and Eddy also tackle the claim that Paul didn't believe Jesus was a real human being--a ridiculous assertion but one that's gained a remarkable amount of traction in recent years. They carefully list the many reasons why this claim doesn't hold up. There's a good, long discussion about the idea of Pagan influences on the gospels that cuts that argument down to size as well.

The second half takes on specific issues within the gospels themselves. It hits all the major points that anyone would expect: dealing with contradictions, archaeology, and extra-biblical sources that mention Jesus. The discussion of the Testimonium Flavinum is particularly even-handed. I also enjoyed the chapter on biblical archaeology and its mention of a dozen discoveries in the Middle East related to the gospels, such as the "Jesus boat" in the Sea of Galilee.

As others have mentioned, these two authors are at pains to be fair about major issues and to acknowledge evidence when it doesn't go the way they want it to. They also pack the book with excellent references and suggestions for further reading. And they are just plain good writing. "Lord or Legend" should be in every Christian's library along with the armor of God and the helmet of salvation.
Lanionge
The first couple books I read about the historical Jesus were the popular ones by Lee Strobel and Josh McDowell, The Case for Christ and More Than a Carpenter. I find those books are both good but with certain flaws, particularly important points that they jump over without much detail. I later read Craig Blomberg's academic treatise The Historical Reliability of the Gospels, which is thorough but perhaps too detailed for some. "Lord or Legend" splits the differences, giving a concise treatment in under 200 pages that nonetheless tackles all the major issues swirling around the topic in recent years. It is also simply more up-to-date than Strobel and McDowell.

The first half tackles approaches to Bible scholarship. One major theme that Strobel and McDowell never touch is the reliability of oral transmission. No one knows exactly when the gospels were written, though we give 70 A.D. as the date that "most scholars agree on". But could the sayings and doings of Jesus have been recorded that long after his death? In fact, scholars have studied the transmission of sayings through oral tradition and found that they remain reliable for much longer periods than that. Boyd and Eddy also tackle the claim that Paul didn't believe Jesus was a real human being--a ridiculous assertion but one that's gained a remarkable amount of traction in recent years. They carefully list the many reasons why this claim doesn't hold up. There's a good, long discussion about the idea of Pagan influences on the gospels that cuts that argument down to size as well.

The second half takes on specific issues within the gospels themselves. It hits all the major points that anyone would expect: dealing with contradictions, archaeology, and extra-biblical sources that mention Jesus. The discussion of the Testimonium Flavinum is particularly even-handed. I also enjoyed the chapter on biblical archaeology and its mention of a dozen discoveries in the Middle East related to the gospels, such as the "Jesus boat" in the Sea of Galilee.

As others have mentioned, these two authors are at pains to be fair about major issues and to acknowledge evidence when it doesn't go the way they want it to. They also pack the book with excellent references and suggestions for further reading. And they are just plain good writing. "Lord or Legend" should be in every Christian's library along with the armor of God and the helmet of salvation.
Bumand
I was at odds for the longest time while pondering the dilemma of the Gospels' accuracy, yet these two professors made one of the best intellectual arguments I've read for the validity of the Gospels, and the truth that the Gospels foretell. I recommend this book to any skeptic--like myself--who has been waiting a while for a true and intellectual argument for the inherency of the Gospels. If there were more believers in God that were *this* intelligent, the world would be utterly and radically different right now (for the better).
Bumand
I was at odds for the longest time while pondering the dilemma of the Gospels' accuracy, yet these two professors made one of the best intellectual arguments I've read for the validity of the Gospels, and the truth that the Gospels foretell. I recommend this book to any skeptic--like myself--who has been waiting a while for a true and intellectual argument for the inherency of the Gospels. If there were more believers in God that were *this* intelligent, the world would be utterly and radically different right now (for the better).
Beahelm
Lord or Legend? is a great introductory book to the historical Jesus. In Lord or Legend? Boyd and Eddy make a case for the historical reliability of the portrait of Jesus painted by the gospels. In making this case Boyd and Eddy expose the myth of the 'neutral' and 'unbaised', historical critical method utilized to disprove the historicity of the gospels and their account of Jesus. Boyd and Eddy demonstrate how the historical critical method and its supporters come to the text of the gospels with their own theological bagage and faith-based presuppostitions, such as a disbelief in miracles. The historical critical method which they apply to the text is then used to disprove the reliability of the gospels based on these presuppostitions. The solution that Boyd and Eddy propose is an 'open' historical critical method which attempts to come to the text unbaised and free of faith-based presuppositions.
Beahelm
Lord or Legend? is a great introductory book to the historical Jesus. In Lord or Legend? Boyd and Eddy make a case for the historical reliability of the portrait of Jesus painted by the gospels. In making this case Boyd and Eddy expose the myth of the 'neutral' and 'unbaised', historical critical method utilized to disprove the historicity of the gospels and their account of Jesus. Boyd and Eddy demonstrate how the historical critical method and its supporters come to the text of the gospels with their own theological bagage and faith-based presuppostitions, such as a disbelief in miracles. The historical critical method which they apply to the text is then used to disprove the reliability of the gospels based on these presuppostitions. The solution that Boyd and Eddy propose is an 'open' historical critical method which attempts to come to the text unbaised and free of faith-based presuppositions.