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Trickster in West Africa: A Study of Mythic Ironies and Sacred Delight (Hermeneutics, studies in the history of religions) epub download

by Robert D. Pelton


This book contains VERY LITTLE in the way of actual myths and folklore and is mostly just Pelton blowing hot air to support his flimsy and rather boring theories. Don't waste your money.

Series: Hermeneutics: Studies in the History of Religions (Book 8). Paperback: 324 pages. Publisher: University of California Press (September 21, 1989). ISBN-10: 9780520067912. ISBN-13: 978-0520067912. This book contains VERY LITTLE in the way of actual myths and folklore and is mostly just Pelton blowing hot air to support his flimsy and rather boring theories. 3 people found this helpful.

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The trickster appears in the myths and folktales of nearly e. .

Irony and Sacred Delight (Hermeneutics: Studies in the History of Religions) by Robert D. Pelton.

The Trickster in West Africa: A Study of Mythic Irony and Sacred Delight (Hermeneutics: Studies in the History of Religions) by Robert D. Published by: University of California Press on 1989-04-01.

Hermeneutics: Studies in the History of Religions. Robert D. Pelton is a Roman Catholic priest, a member of Madonna House Apostolate. The trickster appears in the myths and folktales of nearly every traditional society.

Subjects: Art & Art History, African Studies, Area Studies, Arts. The Trickster in West Africa: A Study of Mythic Irony and Sacred Delight by Robert D. Pelton (pp. 16+19+21). Collections: Arts & Sciences VII Collection, JSTOR Archival Journal & Primary Source Collection, JSTOR Essential Collection. Export Selected Citations. Export to NoodleTools.

Robert Pelton examines Ashanti, Fon, Yoruba, and Dogon trickster-figures i.

Together, let's build an Open Library for the World. September 22, 2017 History. September 22, 2017 History found in the catalog.

of Gold Mountain is a valuable resource for scholars of Chinese and Chinese-American folklore as well as thase with interests in Asian-American Studies. oceedings{Agnew1984TheTI, title {The Trickster in West Africa: A Study of Mythic Irony and Sacred Delight.

With its detailed literary and historical information and the rarely seen inclusion of Chinese texts, Songs of Gold Mountain is a valuable resource for scholars of Chinese and Chinese-American folklore as well as thase with interests in Asian-American Studies. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1980. author {Mary Barbara Agnew}, year {1984} }. Mary Barbara Agnew. Each rhyme is presented in English, using familiar poetic breaks, with footnotes to clarilj literary expressions.

Pelton, Robert D. The Trickster in West Africa: A Study of Mythic Irony and Sacred Delight. Writing Tricksters: Mythic Gambols in American Ethnic Literature. Berkeley: U of California P, 1997. Smith, Jeanne Rosier. Berkeley: U of California P, 1980. Priebe, Richard K. Myth, Realism, and the West African Writer. Trenton, NJ: Africa World P, 1988. Rev. of The Trickster in West Africa: A Study of Mythic Irony and Sacred Delight by Robert D.

The trickster appears in the myths and folktales of nearly every traditional society. Robert Pelton examines Ashanti, Fon, Yoruba, and Dogon trickster-figures in their social and mythical contexts and in light of contemporary thought, exploring the way the trickster links animality and ritual transformation; culture, sex, and laughter; cosmic process and personal history; divination and social change.

Trickster in West Africa: A Study of Mythic Ironies and Sacred Delight (Hermeneutics, studies in the history of religions) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0520034778

ISBN: 0520034775

Author: Robert D. Pelton

Category: Spirituality and spirituality

Subcategory: Other Religions Practices & Sacred Texts

Language: English

Publisher: University of California Press (September 25, 1980)

Pages: 320 pages

ePUB size: 1918 kb

FB2 size: 1764 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 520

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Related to Trickster in West Africa: A Study of Mythic Ironies and Sacred Delight (Hermeneutics, studies in the history of religions) ePub books

Bludsong
This book is not - nor does it claim to be - a collection of myths about the Trickster figure in West Africa, so while the other review is right about there not being many myths included in the book, it is not a fair criticism. If you just want collections of Trickster tales (which are always a delight), there are many such books out there (though mostly with a Euro-centric bias, except for Native American Trickster stories). Pelton's book is a wonderful (IMHO) text on the Trickster figure coming from the field of Religious Studies, and is academic in nature (and yes, discussing, say, the scatological preoccupation with some Tricksters and the polymorphous perversity of others in an academic style is certainly more dry and less fun than reading a few Trickster stories that feature s**t and bawdy bits about huge phalluses (phallusi?), but again, that is the nature of this book - you may gain more wisdom and have a lot more fun reading the primary Trickster stories, but that is not to say you cannot gain knowledge from this book or others like it). As one who has studied the Trickster figure extensively (largely from a Jungian p.o.v. I'll admit, but also appreciating the Trickster as a force that cannot be contained by academia - as a living, laughing, breathing, inspiring, surprising and awe inducing "psychoidal" being, if you will) for years, Pelton's study of the Trickster in West African traditions still ranks, for me, as a top ten in that subject. It is also considered widely as a classic on this subject, very well regarded in the field of Mythology and studies of archetypal symbolism.

I'd also recommend (for those wanting to study the Trickster figure in different cultures) _Mythical Trickster Figures_ edited by William J. Hynes and William G. Doty, it is a great starting place with plenty of references to keep one busy for years, showing how the Trickster appears in many different cultures (Native American, Ancient Greek, West African, etc.). I had the privilege of taking a few classes years ago with Dr. Doty, and the man is like a walking set of encyclopedias when it comes to Mythology.

If you prefer less academic approaches, my favorite Trickster tale anthologies (just the stories, no Ivory Tower commentary) are _American Indian Trickster Tales_ by Richard Erdoes and the several volumes of Sufi teaching stories featuring the holy fool/Trickster of the Middle East and Central Asia, Mulla Nasrudin: especially _The Pleasantries of the Incredible Mulla Nasrudin_, and the two in one _The Exploits of the Incomparable Mulla Nasrudin / The Subtleties of the Inimitable Mulla Nasrudin_ both by Idries Shah.

Hail Eris! -><-
Bludsong
This book is not - nor does it claim to be - a collection of myths about the Trickster figure in West Africa, so while the other review is right about there not being many myths included in the book, it is not a fair criticism. If you just want collections of Trickster tales (which are always a delight), there are many such books out there (though mostly with a Euro-centric bias, except for Native American Trickster stories). Pelton's book is a wonderful (IMHO) text on the Trickster figure coming from the field of Religious Studies, and is academic in nature (and yes, discussing, say, the scatological preoccupation with some Tricksters and the polymorphous perversity of others in an academic style is certainly more dry and less fun than reading a few Trickster stories that feature s**t and bawdy bits about huge phalluses (phallusi?), but again, that is the nature of this book - you may gain more wisdom and have a lot more fun reading the primary Trickster stories, but that is not to say you cannot gain knowledge from this book or others like it). As one who has studied the Trickster figure extensively (largely from a Jungian p.o.v. I'll admit, but also appreciating the Trickster as a force that cannot be contained by academia - as a living, laughing, breathing, inspiring, surprising and awe inducing "psychoidal" being, if you will) for years, Pelton's study of the Trickster in West African traditions still ranks, for me, as a top ten in that subject. It is also considered widely as a classic on this subject, very well regarded in the field of Mythology and studies of archetypal symbolism.

I'd also recommend (for those wanting to study the Trickster figure in different cultures) _Mythical Trickster Figures_ edited by William J. Hynes and William G. Doty, it is a great starting place with plenty of references to keep one busy for years, showing how the Trickster appears in many different cultures (Native American, Ancient Greek, West African, etc.). I had the privilege of taking a few classes years ago with Dr. Doty, and the man is like a walking set of encyclopedias when it comes to Mythology.

If you prefer less academic approaches, my favorite Trickster tale anthologies (just the stories, no Ivory Tower commentary) are _American Indian Trickster Tales_ by Richard Erdoes and the several volumes of Sufi teaching stories featuring the holy fool/Trickster of the Middle East and Central Asia, Mulla Nasrudin: especially _The Pleasantries of the Incredible Mulla Nasrudin_, and the two in one _The Exploits of the Incomparable Mulla Nasrudin / The Subtleties of the Inimitable Mulla Nasrudin_ both by Idries Shah.

Hail Eris! -><-
Memuro
First off, Pelton is not much of a writer. His text is redundant and reading it is unneccesarily laborious. Pelton also seeks to explain Afrikan society and psychology in either Freudian or Jungian terms. This book contains VERY LITTLE in the way of actual myths and folklore and is mostly just Pelton blowing hot air to support his flimsy and rather boring theories. Don't waste your money.
Memuro
First off, Pelton is not much of a writer. His text is redundant and reading it is unneccesarily laborious. Pelton also seeks to explain Afrikan society and psychology in either Freudian or Jungian terms. This book contains VERY LITTLE in the way of actual myths and folklore and is mostly just Pelton blowing hot air to support his flimsy and rather boring theories. Don't waste your money.