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Perfectly Prep: Gender Extremes at a New England Prep School (Child Development in Cultural Context) epub download

by Sarah A. Chase


Child Development in a Cultural Context and is a much needed contribution to the field o. Our University has on its campus a K-5 elementary school. We are working on this being a collaborative partnership with the School of Education.

Child Development in a Cultural Context and is a much needed contribution to the field of. anthropology, psychology and gender studies. In studying the everyday lives of prep school. students, Chase shows how privilege and social hierarchy is perpetuated through the cultural. traditions of the elite institution. Bolton Academy, with its emphasis on social status, makes.

Sarah A. Chase This book examines the price of privilege and uncovers how student culture.

Although New England boarding schools have been educating America's elite for four generations, they, along with their privileged students, rarely have been the subject of study. Living in a senior boys' dorm at a co-ed school, Sarah Chase was able to witness the inner workings of student culture and the dynamics of their peer groups. This book examines the price of privilege and uncovers how student culture reflects and perpetuates society and institutional power structures and gender ideologies. Скачать (pdf, . 7 Mb) Читать. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF.

Moving into a senior boys' dorm at a co-ed New England preparatory school, I soon noticed vast behavioral differences among the students that I found hard to understand

Moving into a senior boys' dorm at a co-ed New England preparatory school, I soon noticed vast behavioral differences among the students that I found hard to understand. In an environment of ivy-covered buildings, institutional goals of excellence and aspirations to Ivy League colleges, I observed that many girls worked themselves into a state of sleep deprivation and despair during exam period while the boys remained seemingly unconcerned and relaxed

Perfectly Prep: Gender Extremes at a New England Prep School. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Perfectly Prep: Gender Extremes at a New England Prep School. oceedings{PG, title {Perfectly Prep: Gender Extremes at a New England Prep School. viii+350pp}, author {Cleti Cervoni}, year {2009} }. Cleti Cervoni.

Perfectly Prep: Gender Extremes at a New England Prep School (Child Development in Cultural Context)Hardcover.

Although attending a private boarding school is no guarantee for admittance to Harvard, it certainly does provide a "booster shot" for incredible success. Perfectly Prep: Gender Extremes at a New England Prep School (Child Development in Cultural Context)Hardcover.

Texts: The following books are required: Sarah Chase, 2008 Perfectly Prep: Gender Extremes at a New England Prep School. New York: Oxford University Press. Marjorie Shostak,1981 Vintage Books. Nisa: The Life and Words of a Kung Woman. New York: Joseph Tobin, David Wu, Dana Davidson 1989 Preschool in Three Cultures: Japan, China and the United States. New Haven:Yale University Press. Tepilit Ole Saitoti, 1986 Press. The Worlds of a Maasai Warrior. Berleley: University of California Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn, 2009 Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into opportunity for Women Worldwide

Similar books and articles. The New Oxford History of England.

Similar books and articles. Perfectly Prep: Gender Extremes at a New England Prep School. Oxford: Clarendon Press; New York: Oxford University Press, 2005. Bridget Haire - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (2):239-249.

Public and charter college prep schools are typically connected to a local school district and draw from the entire district . Sarah Alexander Chase, Perfectly prep: Gender extremes at a New England prep school (Oxford University Press, 2008).

Public and charter college prep schools are typically connected to a local school district and draw from the entire district instead of the closest school zone  .

Although New England boarding schools have been educating America's elite for four generations, they, along with their privileged students, rarely have been the subject of study. Living in a senior boys' dorm at a co-ed school, Sarah Chase was able to witness the inner workings of student culture and the dynamics of their peer groups. In an environment of ivy-covered buildings, institutional goals of excellence and aspirations to Ivy League colleges, the boys and girls acted extremely masculine or feminine. While girls typically worked themselves into a state of sleep deprivation and despair during exam period, the boys remained seemingly unconcerned and relaxed. As much as the girls felt pressure to be "cute" and "perfect," the boys felt pressure to be "bad ass" and the "best at everything." Tellingly, the boys thought that "it would suck" to be a girl, while over one third of the girls wanted to be male if given the chance. From her vantage point of sitting in the back of the football and field hockey buses, attending prom and senior pranks, and listening to how students described their academic and social pressures, competition, rumors, backstabbing, sex, and partying, Chase discovered that these boys and girls shared similar values, needs and desires despite their highly gendered behavior. The large class, ethnic and individual differences in how the students perform their genders reveal the importance of culture in development and the power of individual agency. This book examines the price of privilege and uncovers how student culture reflects and perpetuates society and institutional power structures and gender ideologies.

Perfectly Prep: Gender Extremes at a New England Prep School (Child Development in Cultural Context) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0195308815

ISBN: 0195308816

Author: Sarah A. Chase

Category: Social Sciences

Subcategory: Social Sciences

Language: English

Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (March 20, 2008)

Pages: 368 pages

ePUB size: 1757 kb

FB2 size: 1867 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 391

Other Formats: mobi lrf rtf docx

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Doktilar
As the wife of a faculty member, Sarah Chase was well placed to do anthropological field work in a New England boarding school. There are countless ethnographies written about the world's poorest and most marginalized communities. However, a study about privileged teenage elites and the institutions that educate them is a real rarity. Using her unique access, Chase decided to focus on prep school gender roles and relationships between the sexes.

The best ethnographers are at heart more novelist than note takers. Chase's book is at its best when it describes the rituals of prep school life. She opens up a hidden world by filling us in on the mundane but interesting details of everyday life. Her book loses focus when she leaves the individual and focuses on how the "group" perceives its situation. Ethnographies like novels are best when the narrative is advanced through actions and individual detail.

In the broadest sense, Chase's analysis of how teenagers react to the great freedoms and restrictions that are inherent in the prep school experience rings true. Upon finishing the book, my only reservation is that Chase credits too much the macho boasts of insecure teenage boys. She would be surprised at the depth of inteior lives of even the most loutish of her informants.

Sarah Chase is now a faculty member at the boarding school where she did her field research. One can only hope that one day, she will go back to this same well and provide us with a more nuanced portrait. Prep school as seen through the eys of teachers and administrators might be very interesting.
Doktilar
As the wife of a faculty member, Sarah Chase was well placed to do anthropological field work in a New England boarding school. There are countless ethnographies written about the world's poorest and most marginalized communities. However, a study about privileged teenage elites and the institutions that educate them is a real rarity. Using her unique access, Chase decided to focus on prep school gender roles and relationships between the sexes.

The best ethnographers are at heart more novelist than note takers. Chase's book is at its best when it describes the rituals of prep school life. She opens up a hidden world by filling us in on the mundane but interesting details of everyday life. Her book loses focus when she leaves the individual and focuses on how the "group" perceives its situation. Ethnographies like novels are best when the narrative is advanced through actions and individual detail.

In the broadest sense, Chase's analysis of how teenagers react to the great freedoms and restrictions that are inherent in the prep school experience rings true. Upon finishing the book, my only reservation is that Chase credits too much the macho boasts of insecure teenage boys. She would be surprised at the depth of inteior lives of even the most loutish of her informants.

Sarah Chase is now a faculty member at the boarding school where she did her field research. One can only hope that one day, she will go back to this same well and provide us with a more nuanced portrait. Prep school as seen through the eys of teachers and administrators might be very interesting.
Nanecele
Hi,

I am a happy graduate from Pomfret School in Pomfret CT where Perfectly Prep is based. The school is a very elite mix of wealthy New Englanders, local day students, and a few other international students, usually on scholarships. I must say, it was a rough four years. I am a California native and was an alumni having a couple elderly familiy members from the East Coast attending decades before. I was lucky to get in, and was unprepared for private school in every way.

Four years of coats and ties and Saturday classes, sports and stress later, and I was spit out on the shores of college. I had failed to make the grade at Pomfret, and was lucky to pass as my teachers (that hardly noticed me) would attest.

I found the school impersonal, cold and generally not helpful to an individual who had no private school prep, and came from failing public schools. That being said, for many of my peers it was a fun crucible of learning and playing that kept them safe and away from parents. It was a steppingstone to a great education.

Looking back, I am glad I had the chance to attend. It was a good school and is becoming better as it integrates a more artistic and balanced style of education. I would happily send my kids.

The book does not treat the school, or the schools lifestyle, kindly. And being that the author is a faculty or faculty wife (and dorm parent) there, I admire her for speaking the truth. Reading it reminded me of my time there and to someone who struggled, this is an invaluable resource for healing and understanding what went on. It should also be required reading for parents contemplating private schools, or any schools for their children.

Nikolai Kirkham, class of 1990.
Nanecele
Hi,

I am a happy graduate from Pomfret School in Pomfret CT where Perfectly Prep is based. The school is a very elite mix of wealthy New Englanders, local day students, and a few other international students, usually on scholarships. I must say, it was a rough four years. I am a California native and was an alumni having a couple elderly familiy members from the East Coast attending decades before. I was lucky to get in, and was unprepared for private school in every way.

Four years of coats and ties and Saturday classes, sports and stress later, and I was spit out on the shores of college. I had failed to make the grade at Pomfret, and was lucky to pass as my teachers (that hardly noticed me) would attest.

I found the school impersonal, cold and generally not helpful to an individual who had no private school prep, and came from failing public schools. That being said, for many of my peers it was a fun crucible of learning and playing that kept them safe and away from parents. It was a steppingstone to a great education.

Looking back, I am glad I had the chance to attend. It was a good school and is becoming better as it integrates a more artistic and balanced style of education. I would happily send my kids.

The book does not treat the school, or the schools lifestyle, kindly. And being that the author is a faculty or faculty wife (and dorm parent) there, I admire her for speaking the truth. Reading it reminded me of my time there and to someone who struggled, this is an invaluable resource for healing and understanding what went on. It should also be required reading for parents contemplating private schools, or any schools for their children.

Nikolai Kirkham, class of 1990.
Gribandis
I am assigning this book in an educational theory class I teach at a large University because it deals effectively with the nitty-gritty of social life in prep schools in a richly detailed manner. This is a great strength of this book. At a personal level, I did not attend prep schools and this book made me thankful that I did not. Nor would I send my children; I'll take the social problems of public school. Elite prep schools started as cloistered environments for the preparation of character and the preservation of privilege, and this book illustrates the positives and the negatives of 'total institutions' for teenagers. It thus shows the difference between romantic idealization and practical, human reality.

The narrative was very thorough to the point of being repetitive; analytic points were developed early and then continually returned to under different thematic headings later in the book. I felt like the book could have been 100 pages shorter. I also wondered if she essentialized gender at times, effectively perpetuating the binary that she was analyzing and trying to make problematic (Girls are more openly emotive, boys can't express their emotions). The best analytic insights came when she examined the intersection of gender and class, for instance, explaining why it was OK for the very wealthy males to wear pink: Their class position can withstand attacks of feminization. It was at these moments where the gender binary broke down in complex ways and I found these to be the best parts of the book.

There is a wider class context that I also wish was addressed (that is alluded to in the above example). Sure, gender binaries were perpetuated in stereotypically adolescent ways, but the material consequences for these children of 'falling into' this gender trap are minimal. It might be a good thing for boys to feel safer expressing their emotions and girls to be less preoccupied with their social lives, but at the end of the day, for the vast majority of these individuals, these are highly functional patterns that serve as a staging area for their later, privileged lives. If they weren't, they wouldn't exist like this. Chase touched on this - but I kept wondering, "Would these children choose a different kind of educational institution - say, a progressive public school - that allowed for a fuller range of expression?" I bet not; too much is at stake for them to risk giving up their privilege for the sake of wider gender expresisveness. Class was lightly handled and dealing with it more would have made for a more textured analysis.

A good book in general and I am sure it is cathartic for students at prep schools and enlightening for parents.
Gribandis
I am assigning this book in an educational theory class I teach at a large University because it deals effectively with the nitty-gritty of social life in prep schools in a richly detailed manner. This is a great strength of this book. At a personal level, I did not attend prep schools and this book made me thankful that I did not. Nor would I send my children; I'll take the social problems of public school. Elite prep schools started as cloistered environments for the preparation of character and the preservation of privilege, and this book illustrates the positives and the negatives of 'total institutions' for teenagers. It thus shows the difference between romantic idealization and practical, human reality.

The narrative was very thorough to the point of being repetitive; analytic points were developed early and then continually returned to under different thematic headings later in the book. I felt like the book could have been 100 pages shorter. I also wondered if she essentialized gender at times, effectively perpetuating the binary that she was analyzing and trying to make problematic (Girls are more openly emotive, boys can't express their emotions). The best analytic insights came when she examined the intersection of gender and class, for instance, explaining why it was OK for the very wealthy males to wear pink: Their class position can withstand attacks of feminization. It was at these moments where the gender binary broke down in complex ways and I found these to be the best parts of the book.

There is a wider class context that I also wish was addressed (that is alluded to in the above example). Sure, gender binaries were perpetuated in stereotypically adolescent ways, but the material consequences for these children of 'falling into' this gender trap are minimal. It might be a good thing for boys to feel safer expressing their emotions and girls to be less preoccupied with their social lives, but at the end of the day, for the vast majority of these individuals, these are highly functional patterns that serve as a staging area for their later, privileged lives. If they weren't, they wouldn't exist like this. Chase touched on this - but I kept wondering, "Would these children choose a different kind of educational institution - say, a progressive public school - that allowed for a fuller range of expression?" I bet not; too much is at stake for them to risk giving up their privilege for the sake of wider gender expresisveness. Class was lightly handled and dealing with it more would have made for a more textured analysis.

A good book in general and I am sure it is cathartic for students at prep schools and enlightening for parents.