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Law and Community in Three American Towns epub download

by Barbara Yngvesson,David M. Engel,Carol J. Greenhouse


They show that residents of "Riverside," Sander County, and Hopewell interpret litigation as a sign of social decline, but they also value law as a symbol of their local way of life. The book focuses on this ambivalence and relates it to the deeply-felt tensions express between community and rights as rival bases of society.

Carol J. Greenhouse is Professor and Chair in the Department of Anthropology at Princeton . Greenhouse is Professor and Chair in the Department of Anthropology at Princeton University. Paperback: 240 pages.

They show that residents of "Riverside," "Sander County," and "Hopewell" interpret litigation as a sign of social decline, but they also value law as a symbol of their local way of life. The book focuses on this ambivalence and relates it to the deeply-felt tensions express between "community" and "rights" as rival bases of society.

Law and Community in Three American Towns. Published by: Cornell University Press. This book is about community, law, and change in the United States and the ways these shape people’s sense of identity in three different American settings. The places are towns, counties, and suburbs in New England, the Midwest, and the South. In each, certain people identify themselves and their places with what some of them might call mainstream America.

Carol J Greenhouse, Barbara Yngvesson, David M Engel.

Book is in good reading condition. Cover has wear at edges and corners, and may have creases

Book is in good reading condition. Cover has wear at edges and corners, and may have creases.

Carol Jane Greenhouse is an American anthropologist, educator .

Carol Jane Greenhouse is an American anthropologist, educator and author. She holds the position of Arthur W. Marks ’19 Professor of Anthropology at Princeton University.

Are you sure you want to remove Law and community in three American towns from your list? Law and community in three American towns. by Carol J. Greenhouse. Published 1994 by Cornell University Press in Ithaca. Greenhouse, Barbara Yngvesson, David M. Engel

Law and Community in Three American Towns. Engel. ISBN 9780801481697 (978-0-8014-8169-7) Softcover, Cornell University Press, 1994. Find signed collectible books: 'Law and Community in Three American Towns'.

Many commentators on the contemporary United States believe that current rates of litigation are a sign of decay in the nation’s social fabric. Law and Community in Three American Towns explores how ordinary people in three towns―located in New England, the Midwest, and the South―view the law, courts, litigants, and social order.

Carol J. Greenhouse, Barbara Yngvesson, and David M. Engel analyze attitudes toward law and law users as a way of commentating on major American myths and ongoing changes in American society. They show that residents of "Riverside," "Sander County," and "Hopewell" interpret litigation as a sign of social decline, but they also value law as a symbol of their local way of life. The book focuses on this ambivalence and relates it to the deeply-felt tensions express between "community" and "rights" as rival bases of society.

The authors, two anthropologists and a lawyer, each with an understanding of a particular region, were surprised to discover that such different locales produced parallel findings. They undertook a comparative project to find out why ambivalence toward the law and law use should be such a common refrain. The answer, they believe, turns out to be less a matter of local traditions than of the ways that people perceive the patterns of their lives as being vulnerable to external forces of change.

Law and Community in Three American Towns epub download

ISBN13: 978-0801429590

ISBN: 0801429595

Author: Barbara Yngvesson,David M. Engel,Carol J. Greenhouse

Category: Social Sciences

Subcategory: Politics & Government

Language: English

Publisher: Cornell University Press (June 3, 1994)

Pages: 240 pages

ePUB size: 1184 kb

FB2 size: 1796 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 957

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Dammy
This was a very interesting piece. The author shines light on things that you've always wondered about but could never really figure out. Good read.
Dammy
This was a very interesting piece. The author shines light on things that you've always wondered about but could never really figure out. Good read.
Der Bat
Despite its rather incoherent, overlapping and chaotic organization, as a book thrown together from 3 originally independent case studies, and despite the over-reliance of the three authors on pedantic anthropological jargon, "Law and Community" succeeds as a scholarly work because it penetrates rather deeply into a fascinating area of legal studies: legalism and anti-legalism in the relationship between law and traditional American society.
Most people know that America is an anti-legalistic society, with an abundance of lawyer jokes and "tort tale" horror stories (usually myths) such as the lady that spilled McDonald's coffee on herself and supposedly won millions. But very few people know the conservative political agenda that lies at the root of such anti-legalism. "Law and Community" succeeds as political science because it reveals the political (class, racial, etc.) motives behind the anti-legalism of "insiders" in 3 American towns who deride outsiders (poor, working class, non-religious) folks as being "sue-happy" and "out for a quick buck". In short, America vilifies these individuals, who sue companies for negligence, because the pro-business social fabric of our towns is built on a foundation of rugged, self-reliant individualism that says not to blame anybody else for your problems.
However, this traditional brand of individualism can be contrasted with another type of individualism, equally as "American" in origin, that says that disadvantaged people have certain "rights", including a "right" to assert these rights in a fair court of law. But in the 3 towns in this book, outsiders who assert these rights against small businesspeople are ostracized from the community and rarely given a fair hearing within the supposedly impartial legal system itself. However, when the towns' insiders wish to take their problems to court, to defend their contracts, leases, etc., we see a double standard in operation. Insiders use law successfully, when it suits their interests, and then villify others that wish to use law against them. The book does a great job of revealing this political cleavage, through detailed case studies, interviews and ethnographic research.
As mentioned above, my two biggest critiques are the poor organization of the book (almost a third of it is either overlap or fluff) and the tendency of the 3 authors, like many anthropologists, to cloak their otherwise interesting references into a postmodern fog of Foucault references and fancy cultural studies terms that will only turn off the undergraduate reader and give them a headache. But if you can handle these two problems, this book makes great material for a course in law, anthropology, political science, sociology, or any combination thereof.
Der Bat
Despite its rather incoherent, overlapping and chaotic organization, as a book thrown together from 3 originally independent case studies, and despite the over-reliance of the three authors on pedantic anthropological jargon, "Law and Community" succeeds as a scholarly work because it penetrates rather deeply into a fascinating area of legal studies: legalism and anti-legalism in the relationship between law and traditional American society.
Most people know that America is an anti-legalistic society, with an abundance of lawyer jokes and "tort tale" horror stories (usually myths) such as the lady that spilled McDonald's coffee on herself and supposedly won millions. But very few people know the conservative political agenda that lies at the root of such anti-legalism. "Law and Community" succeeds as political science because it reveals the political (class, racial, etc.) motives behind the anti-legalism of "insiders" in 3 American towns who deride outsiders (poor, working class, non-religious) folks as being "sue-happy" and "out for a quick buck". In short, America vilifies these individuals, who sue companies for negligence, because the pro-business social fabric of our towns is built on a foundation of rugged, self-reliant individualism that says not to blame anybody else for your problems.
However, this traditional brand of individualism can be contrasted with another type of individualism, equally as "American" in origin, that says that disadvantaged people have certain "rights", including a "right" to assert these rights in a fair court of law. But in the 3 towns in this book, outsiders who assert these rights against small businesspeople are ostracized from the community and rarely given a fair hearing within the supposedly impartial legal system itself. However, when the towns' insiders wish to take their problems to court, to defend their contracts, leases, etc., we see a double standard in operation. Insiders use law successfully, when it suits their interests, and then villify others that wish to use law against them. The book does a great job of revealing this political cleavage, through detailed case studies, interviews and ethnographic research.
As mentioned above, my two biggest critiques are the poor organization of the book (almost a third of it is either overlap or fluff) and the tendency of the 3 authors, like many anthropologists, to cloak their otherwise interesting references into a postmodern fog of Foucault references and fancy cultural studies terms that will only turn off the undergraduate reader and give them a headache. But if you can handle these two problems, this book makes great material for a course in law, anthropology, political science, sociology, or any combination thereof.