» » The Bushes: Portrait of a Dynasty

The Bushes: Portrait of a Dynasty epub download

by Peter Schweizer and Rochelle Schweizer,Robertson Dean


Peter and Rochelle Schweizer, the authors of The Bushes: Portrait of a Dynasty, claim to have relied mainly on interviews with friends and family members of George W. and George H. W. Bush for their information

Peter and Rochelle Schweizer, the authors of The Bushes: Portrait of a Dynasty, claim to have relied mainly on interviews with friends and family members of George W. Bush for their information. The authors' politics apparently leans to the right, judging from the recent release of a new book by Schweizer about the hypocrisy of liberals. And yet, The Bushes: Portrait of a Dynasty, while hardly a brutal attack on the family, does not leave the reader with a very positive view of the Bushes. George H. comes across as an ambitious man who schmoozed his way into jobs, and.

Schweizer, Peter, 1964-; Schweizer, Rochelle, 1961

Schweizer, Peter, 1964-; Schweizer, Rochelle, 1961-.

Peter and Rochelle Schweizer, the authors of The Bushes: Portrait of a Dynasty, claim to have relied mainly on interviews with friends and family . Portrait of a Dynasty is an enjoyable read, and I have only one quibble. There is too much repitition.

Peter and Rochelle Schweizer, the authors of The Bushes: Portrait of a Dynasty, claim to have relied mainly on interviews with friends and family members of George W.

The Schweizers also delve into the Bushes’ sensitive and secret business dealings, including their long history of involvement in the oil business. Their shrewd alliances with other American dynasties-including the Kennedys, Rockefellers, and Tafts-have all helped to quietly consolidate their power within the Republican Party. Indeed, what makes the Bushes so successful is that they function less like the great political families before them and more like a high-tech startup: free-flowing, pragmatic, and opportunistic.

In this first full-scale biography, Peter and Rochelle Schweizer insightfully explore the secrets of the Bushes’ rise from obscurity to unprecedented influence. The family’s free-flowing, pragmatic, and opportunistic style consciously distinguishes them from previous political dynasties; they consider themselves the un-Kennedys. But with their abiding emphasis on loyalty and networking, the Bushes’ continuing success seems assured–making this book essential reading for anyone who cares about America’s future. THE BUSHES: Portrait of a Dynasty

THE BUSHES Portrait of a Dynasty. Narrator Robertson Dean is well suited to the subject, with a voice carrying neither Connecticut nor Texas undertones.

THE BUSHES Portrait of a Dynasty. by Peter Schweizer, Rochelle Schweizer Read by Robertson Dean. Bush, like his father, Senator Prescott Bush of Connecticut, committed himself to creating a firm financial foundation before entering politics. c) AudioFile 2004, Portland, Maine.

The Schweizers did a good job of balancing the book. It is not dry and academic, but reads almost like a novel

The Bushes: Portrait of a Dynasty, written by Peter and Rochelle Schweizer, is not so much about the Bush presidents as it is about the remarkable family that spawned them. Starting at the turn of the century with the stories of Samuel P. Bush and George Herbert Walker, the authors chronicle the rise of the Bush family that almost mirrors the American story of the 20th Century. The Schweizers did a good job of balancing the book. It is not dry and academic, but reads almost like a novel. They don't take a pro- or anti-Bush stance, but let the narrative speak for itself.

Written by Peter Schweizer, Rochelle Schweizer, narrated by Robertson Dean, Rochelle Schweizer. Portrait of a Dynasty. The Schweizers also delve into the Bushes' sensitive and secret business dealings, including their long history of involvement in the oil business. By: Peter Schweizer, Rochelle Schweizer. Narrated by: Robertson Dean, Rochelle Schweizer. Length: 23 hrs and 20 mins. Categories: Biographies & Memoirs, Political Figures.

Audio book - 16 cassettes - 90 minutes each

The Bushes: Portrait of a Dynasty epub download

ISBN13: 978-0736697286

ISBN: 0736697284

Author: Peter Schweizer and Rochelle Schweizer,Robertson Dean

Category: Social Sciences

Subcategory: Politics & Government

Language: English

Publisher: Books on Tape; Unabridged edition (2004)

ePUB size: 1930 kb

FB2 size: 1778 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 177

Other Formats: azw txt rtf doc

Related to The Bushes: Portrait of a Dynasty ePub books

Sharpbinder
Interesting book. Story moves along, topic was well-researched. I like the pictures
Sharpbinder
Interesting book. Story moves along, topic was well-researched. I like the pictures
Gajurus
great
Gajurus
great
Akinozuru
I bought this for my Dad who loves political books from both sides of the aisle. He gave it his stamp of approval.
Akinozuru
I bought this for my Dad who loves political books from both sides of the aisle. He gave it his stamp of approval.
Butius
Excellent read. Well written and well researched. Although the W history is decidedly written from a supporter perspective without a criticism of most of his missteps.
Butius
Excellent read. Well written and well researched. Although the W history is decidedly written from a supporter perspective without a criticism of most of his missteps.
Gholbirius
The bushes is a will written bio of the of the bush family which has helped on a family tree project was a good buy
Gholbirius
The bushes is a will written bio of the of the bush family which has helped on a family tree project was a good buy
Malann
It is written that good fruit comes from good trees. The Bush family is a living example of this assertion five generations back. This book has been well researched. Best wishes.
Malann
It is written that good fruit comes from good trees. The Bush family is a living example of this assertion five generations back. This book has been well researched. Best wishes.
Aurizar
This book covers 4 generations of Bushes - with emphasis on the 2 most recent and particular intensity on George Sr., Jr. and JEB (interestingly John Ellis Bush). I don't think anyone can read/listen to this book without coming away with at least some admiration for George Sr. His heroism in the Pacific during WWII, his pioneering work as an offshore oil man and the integrity with which he carried himself as a politician are convincingly demonstrated. However, even the authors seem to find it difficult to come up with things to admire about George W. About the best they can do is to demonstrate his skills as a promoter (with the Rangers) and his ability to make and keep friends.

I enjoyed this book and learned a great deal from it. I'm giving it four stars because it is unquestionably biased in favor of its subject. Perhaps the authors were forced to write this way in order to gain the access and get the interviews they did. Still, as long as you keep in mind that there is more to the Bush family than what's in this book, it's well worth the effort.
Aurizar
This book covers 4 generations of Bushes - with emphasis on the 2 most recent and particular intensity on George Sr., Jr. and JEB (interestingly John Ellis Bush). I don't think anyone can read/listen to this book without coming away with at least some admiration for George Sr. His heroism in the Pacific during WWII, his pioneering work as an offshore oil man and the integrity with which he carried himself as a politician are convincingly demonstrated. However, even the authors seem to find it difficult to come up with things to admire about George W. About the best they can do is to demonstrate his skills as a promoter (with the Rangers) and his ability to make and keep friends.

I enjoyed this book and learned a great deal from it. I'm giving it four stars because it is unquestionably biased in favor of its subject. Perhaps the authors were forced to write this way in order to gain the access and get the interviews they did. Still, as long as you keep in mind that there is more to the Bush family than what's in this book, it's well worth the effort.
Peter and Rochelle Schweizer, the authors of The Bushes: Portrait of a Dynasty, claim to have relied mainly on interviews with friends and family members of George W. and George H. W. Bush for their information. The authors' politics apparently leans to the right, judging from the recent release of a new book by Schweizer about the hypocrisy of liberals. And yet, The Bushes: Portrait of a Dynasty, while hardly a brutal attack on the family, does not leave the reader with a very positive view of the Bushes.

George H. W. comes across as an ambitious man who schmoozed his way into jobs, and who worked hard, but who had no big goals he wanted to accomplish. He famously acknowledged that he lacked "the vision thing." He seemed to be absent as a father, but that wasn't unusual in those days. Still, for a man who claimed to prize loyalty and family above all, it was unforgivable for him to miss George W.'s graduation from Yale. His father's absence at the ceremony was a big disappointment to George W., according to this book, so it seems even stranger that he too would miss his own daughters' graduations.

George W., in this book, comes across as a rude, foul-mouthed, ruthless politician who learned the family business while acting the heavy during his father's administration. He also learned that the press was the enemy and that his father wasn't tough enough. His behavior while he was drinking was irresponsible, but after he stopped drinking and found religion, he didn't seem to be any more pleasant to be around. He still mocked friends as well as perceived enemies and was strident about his religious beliefs.

I'll admit that I skipped most of the parts about the generations before George H. W., but the sections on the two presidents, plus Jeb and the other brothers, make up for the boring spots. The women are glossed over, not because of the authors' bias, but because women are only for support in this family. Barbara burst out of that role and upstaged her husband, but it is unlikely that Laura will do anything like that. And the lone sister, Doro, makes no mark at all.

Portrait of a Dynasty is an enjoyable read, and I have only one quibble. There is too much repitition. In one paragraph, Laura is described first as "shy," then as "reluctant,", and finally as "shy and reluctant." Maureen Dowd's on-again, off-again e-mail correspondence with George H. W. is mentioned several times. This sort of thing happens throughout the book. Other than that, I recommend the book to Bush fans and non-fans alike.
Peter and Rochelle Schweizer, the authors of The Bushes: Portrait of a Dynasty, claim to have relied mainly on interviews with friends and family members of George W. and George H. W. Bush for their information. The authors' politics apparently leans to the right, judging from the recent release of a new book by Schweizer about the hypocrisy of liberals. And yet, The Bushes: Portrait of a Dynasty, while hardly a brutal attack on the family, does not leave the reader with a very positive view of the Bushes.

George H. W. comes across as an ambitious man who schmoozed his way into jobs, and who worked hard, but who had no big goals he wanted to accomplish. He famously acknowledged that he lacked "the vision thing." He seemed to be absent as a father, but that wasn't unusual in those days. Still, for a man who claimed to prize loyalty and family above all, it was unforgivable for him to miss George W.'s graduation from Yale. His father's absence at the ceremony was a big disappointment to George W., according to this book, so it seems even stranger that he too would miss his own daughters' graduations.

George W., in this book, comes across as a rude, foul-mouthed, ruthless politician who learned the family business while acting the heavy during his father's administration. He also learned that the press was the enemy and that his father wasn't tough enough. His behavior while he was drinking was irresponsible, but after he stopped drinking and found religion, he didn't seem to be any more pleasant to be around. He still mocked friends as well as perceived enemies and was strident about his religious beliefs.

I'll admit that I skipped most of the parts about the generations before George H. W., but the sections on the two presidents, plus Jeb and the other brothers, make up for the boring spots. The women are glossed over, not because of the authors' bias, but because women are only for support in this family. Barbara burst out of that role and upstaged her husband, but it is unlikely that Laura will do anything like that. And the lone sister, Doro, makes no mark at all.

Portrait of a Dynasty is an enjoyable read, and I have only one quibble. There is too much repitition. In one paragraph, Laura is described first as "shy," then as "reluctant,", and finally as "shy and reluctant." Maureen Dowd's on-again, off-again e-mail correspondence with George H. W. is mentioned several times. This sort of thing happens throughout the book. Other than that, I recommend the book to Bush fans and non-fans alike.