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Eisenhower 1956: The President's Year of Crisis--Suez and the Brink of War epub download

by David A. Nichols


A riveting and relevant analysis of a sequence of events that placed the great nations of the period at the brink of a world wa. .

Nichols' rigorous use of primary sources is not only a model for historians, but it also makes for a superb read. Jean Edward Smith, author of "FDR "and "Grant". David Nichols's book on Eisenhower's momentous year is fresh and insightful-and powerful and exciting. A riveting and relevant analysis of a sequence of events that placed the great nations of the period at the brink of a world wa.A pioneer in the Eisenhower landscape. Nichols captures all of this with his trademark precision.

Eisenhower 1956 book. Eisenhower And The Suez Crisis. In 1978, historian David Nichols published his first book "Lincoln and the Indians", which remains a rare study of a frequently overlooked aspect of Lincoln's presidency. Following his retirement from academic life, Nichols, who resides near the Eisenhower Library in Abilene, Kansas, effectively began a second career as a historian of the Eisenhower administration.

The year was 1956, Dwight Eisenhower was president, and the . government was considering sanctions against Israel. And, possibly even having to fight Israel. The author focuses on the level-headed leadership of Eisenhower, who juggled the explosive crisis as he dealt with the Soviet invasion of Hungary, his health woes, and the 1956 election.

Nichols shows how two life-threatening ’s heart attack in September 1955 and his abdominal surgery in June 1956-took the president out of action at critical moments and contributed to missteps by his administration. In 1956, more than two thirds of Western Europe’s oil supplies transited the Suez Canal, which was run by a company controlled by the British and French, Egypt’s former colonial masters. When the United States withdrew its offer to finance the Aswan Dam in July of that year, Egypt’s president, Gamal Abdel Nasser, nationalized the canal.

Acclaimed Eisenhower expert David Nichols masterfully weaves great personal drama-Eisenhower’s two life-threatening illnesses-with simultaneous world crises (America’s closest allies invade Egypt while th.

Acclaimed Eisenhower expert David Nichols masterfully weaves great personal drama-Eisenhower’s two life-threatening illnesses-with simultaneous world crises (America’s closest allies invade Egypt while the Soviets invade Hungary) and the final days of the 1956 presidential election campaign into a white-knuckle read. This is a very good book. I now understand the position we are in in the Mid-East. We could use people like Eisenhower now to get us out of the quagmire we have gotten into at home and abroad. I feel everyone should read Eisenhower 1956.

Nichols, David A. Eisenhower 1956: The President's Year of Crisis-Suez and the Brink of War (2012). My Three Years With Eisenhower The Personal Diary of Captain Harry C. Butcher, USNR, candid memoir by a top aide. Eisenhower, Dwight D. (1948)

Nichols, David A. Pach, Chester . and Richardson, Elmo (1991). Presidency of Dwight D. Eisenhower. (1948). Crusade in Europe, his war memoirs. (1963). Mandate for Change, 1953–1956. (1965). (1981).

David A. Nichols' Eisenhower 1956 examines the leadership of . President Dwight David Eisenhower through this crisis. United States open for several decades-raise the question as to whether there is anything new to say. Broadly speaking, the answer is no: scholars for decades have challenged and refuted the at-the-time condescension of their predecessors, who dismissed Eisenhower as genial but semi-retired, unengaged and willing to leave Secretary of State John Foster Dulles in charge of . Nichols - Eisenhower The President's Year of Crisis-Suez and the Brink of Wa.

A portrait of the thirty-fourth president covers his years as a five-star general and his two presidential terms, as well as his Kansas childhood, West Point education, and volatile relationship with Richard Nixon. Carnegie-Stout Public Library catalog Details for: Eisenhower.

Acclaimed Eisenhower expert David Nichols masterfully weaves great personal drama-Eisenhower’s two . One of the greatest of his achievements was the commanding way in which he handled the Suez Crisis of 1956. In that year, America's closest allies pursued a course of action profoundly adverse to . interests and which also brought the world to the brink of nuclear war.

A gripping tale of international intrigue and betray-al, Eisenhower 1956 is the white-knuckle story of how President Dwight D. Eisenhower guided the United States through the Suez Canal crisis of 1956. The crisis climaxed in a tumultuous nine-day period fraught with peril just prior to the 1956 presidential election, with Great Britain, France, and Israel invading Egypt while the Soviet Union ruthlessly crushed rebellion in Hungary. David A. Nichols, a leading expert on Eisenhower’s presidency, draws on hundreds of documents declassified in the last thirty years, enabling the reader to look over Ike’s shoulder and follow him day by day, sometimes hour by hour as he grappled with the greatest international crisis of his presidency. The author uses formerly top secret minutes of National Security Council and Oval Office meetings to illuminate a crisis that threatened to escalate into global conflict. Nichols shows how two life-threatening illnesses—Eisenhower’s heart attack in September 1955 and his abdominal surgery in June 1956—took the president out of action at critical moments and contributed to missteps by his administration. In 1956, more than two thirds of Western Europe’s oil supplies transited the Suez Canal, which was run by a company controlled by the British and French, Egypt’s former colonial masters. When the United States withdrew its offer to finance the Aswan Dam in July of that year, Egypt’s president, Gamal Abdel Nasser, nationalized the canal. Without Eisenhower’s knowledge, Britain and France secretly plotted with Israel to invade Egypt and topple Nasser. On October 29—nine days before the U.S. presidential election—Israel invaded Egypt, setting the stage for a “perfect storm.” British and French forces soon began bombing Egyptian ports and airfields and landing troops who quickly routed the Egyptian army. Eisenhower condemned the attacks and pressed for a cease-fire at the United Nations. Within days, in Hungary, Soviet troops and tanks were killing thousands to suppress that nation’s bid for freedom. When Moscow openly threatened to intervene in the Middle East, Eisenhower placed American military forces—including some with nuclear weapons—on alert and sternly warned the Soviet Union against intervention. On November 6, Election Day, after voting at his home in Gettysburg, Ike rushed back to the White House to review disturbing intelligence from Moscow with his military advisors. That same day, he learned that the United Nations had negotiated a cease-fire in the Suez war—a result, in no small measure, of Eisenhower’s steadfast opposition to the war and his refusal to aid the allies. In the aftermath of the Suez crisis, the United States effectively replaced Great Britain as the guarantor of stability in the Middle East. More than a half century later, that commitment remains the underlying premise for American policy in the region. Historians have long treated the Suez Crisis as a minor episode in the dissolution of colonial rule after World War II. As David Nichols makes clear in Eisenhower 1956, it was much more than that.

Eisenhower 1956: The President's Year of Crisis--Suez and the Brink of War epub download

ISBN13: 978-1439139332

ISBN: 1439139334

Author: David A. Nichols

Category: Social Sciences

Subcategory: Politics & Government

Language: English

Publisher: Simon & Schuster; 1St Edition edition (March 8, 2011)

Pages: 368 pages

ePUB size: 1450 kb

FB2 size: 1355 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 790

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Related to Eisenhower 1956: The President's Year of Crisis--Suez and the Brink of War ePub books

Zetadda
The first week of November, 1956: Soviet tanks were crushing the Hungarian uprising. Israel had invaded the Gaza Strip and the Sinai. British and French paratroopers landed to secure the Suez Canal, and the Egyptians were sinking ships to block it, endangering oil flows to Europe. Secretary of State John Foster Dulles was hospitalized. It was the week that the U.S. presidential campaign was coming to a frenzied close. This was the crescendo of a year of crisis that had also seen President Eisenhower suffer a heart attack and endure intestinal surgery. The D-Day Commander, now President, faced an extraordinarily complex array of challenges.

The tight focus of historian David Nichols in this book is President Eisenhower's leadership. Drawing on detailed White House and National Security Council minutes, archival records, and scores of diaries, memoirs and oral histories, he well demonstrates Eisenhower's capacity (the ability to receive huge amounts of information under stressful conditions), reliance on planning, and strategic vision. Nichols traces the intense Presidential, political, military, and diplomatic maneuvering during the Suez Crisis, demonstrating Eisenhower's masterful orchestration of all the elements of American power. It included some behind-the-scenes arm twisting directed at France and the United Kingdom; both allies had "double-crossed" the President, hiding their preparations for war.

Eisenhower avoided war and set out a new direction for U.S. policy in the Middle East. Nichols lays to rest earlier impressions of Eisenhower as detached, or ill, or intellectually unequal to the Presidency. He discredits old notions that it was the ideological Dulles that drove U.S. foreign policy; rather Dulles needed close guidance by the President. The Aswan Dam crisis demonstrates the importance of U.S. foreign aid among the instruments of power. The book does not burnish the reputations of Adlai Stevenson, Eleanor Roosevelt, Anthony Eden, and Allen Dulles (and the CIA). It shows the strength of Attorney General Herbert Brownell, Senator Walter George, press secretary James Haggerty, U.N. Secretary-General Dag Hammarskjold, and U.S. Ambassador to Egypt Robert Byroade. And Nichols credits another intelligence source -- images from the Lockheed U-2 in its first important operation.

When Egypt is once again in the news, and the American President contemplates what American can -- and can't -- do in the Middle East, this book is timely.

-30-
Zetadda
The first week of November, 1956: Soviet tanks were crushing the Hungarian uprising. Israel had invaded the Gaza Strip and the Sinai. British and French paratroopers landed to secure the Suez Canal, and the Egyptians were sinking ships to block it, endangering oil flows to Europe. Secretary of State John Foster Dulles was hospitalized. It was the week that the U.S. presidential campaign was coming to a frenzied close. This was the crescendo of a year of crisis that had also seen President Eisenhower suffer a heart attack and endure intestinal surgery. The D-Day Commander, now President, faced an extraordinarily complex array of challenges.

The tight focus of historian David Nichols in this book is President Eisenhower's leadership. Drawing on detailed White House and National Security Council minutes, archival records, and scores of diaries, memoirs and oral histories, he well demonstrates Eisenhower's capacity (the ability to receive huge amounts of information under stressful conditions), reliance on planning, and strategic vision. Nichols traces the intense Presidential, political, military, and diplomatic maneuvering during the Suez Crisis, demonstrating Eisenhower's masterful orchestration of all the elements of American power. It included some behind-the-scenes arm twisting directed at France and the United Kingdom; both allies had "double-crossed" the President, hiding their preparations for war.

Eisenhower avoided war and set out a new direction for U.S. policy in the Middle East. Nichols lays to rest earlier impressions of Eisenhower as detached, or ill, or intellectually unequal to the Presidency. He discredits old notions that it was the ideological Dulles that drove U.S. foreign policy; rather Dulles needed close guidance by the President. The Aswan Dam crisis demonstrates the importance of U.S. foreign aid among the instruments of power. The book does not burnish the reputations of Adlai Stevenson, Eleanor Roosevelt, Anthony Eden, and Allen Dulles (and the CIA). It shows the strength of Attorney General Herbert Brownell, Senator Walter George, press secretary James Haggerty, U.N. Secretary-General Dag Hammarskjold, and U.S. Ambassador to Egypt Robert Byroade. And Nichols credits another intelligence source -- images from the Lockheed U-2 in its first important operation.

When Egypt is once again in the news, and the American President contemplates what American can -- and can't -- do in the Middle East, this book is timely.

-30-
Āłł_Ÿøūrš
I recently read Lynne Olson's Troublesome Young Men: The Rebels Who Brought Churchill to Power and Helped Save England (which was a well researched, well written book). In the postscript of that book, Ms. Olson mentioned how Anthony Eden, who became Britain's Prime Minister in the mid-1950s drew the precisely wrong lesson in handling concerns about the Suez Canal from Chamberlain's mishandling of the Nazi threat in the late 1930s. I realized that I knew very little about the Suez crisis of 1955-1956 and looked for a book that would educate me in that matter.
Eisenhower 1956 is also a very well researched book that provides great insight into Eisenhower's worldview and effectiveness as President. 1955 and 1956 were certainly crucial years in his presidency. He suffered a significant heart attack near the end of 1955 and required major surgery for a digestive problem in early 1956. Accordingly, serious questions arose as to whether he should run for re-election in 1956. Also, the dynamics of the situation in the Middle-East changed significantly when Egypt's new ruler, Gamal Nassar, nationalized the Suez Canal and had Egypt take over operation of it from France and Britain as a way to pay for the Aswan Dam project after the Western allies withdrew offers to finance it.
In the meantime, while Eisenhower's health issues limited the hours that he could work, France and Britain involved Israel in a plan to take back control of the Suez Canal while misleading the US about their intentions.
When France and Britain went forward with their plan just before the 1956 election, the Soviet Union was in the process of putting down the brave efforts by Hungary to withdraw from the Soviet bloc. France and Britain's Suez misadventure then allowed the Soviets to get a military foothold in the Middle East via Syria such that the US's ability to intervene in the Hungarian situation was seriously compromised. Eisenhower's handling of all of these problems amid a campaign for re-election are carefully detailed in this book leaving no doubt but that Eisenhower was a thoughtful, pragmatic, effective President whose major efforts to minimize the likelihood of a nuclear war while maintaining the US's standing in the world were impressive.
The problem with this book is that the author feels the need to show off his research so that it bogs down with endless minutia about Eisenhower's golf games, the itinerary and scheduling of meetings, Eisenhower's health situation virtually day by day. This book could have benefited significantly from the involvement of a good editor. In addition, the attention to the day to day activities as between Eisenhower and his Secretary of State John Foster Dulles results in a myopic focus that results in a less than clear cut sense of the situation in Hungary. Similarly, while the author provides a helpful picture of Eisenhower's handling of the 1956 election campaign, one is not provided with any sense of how serious the Stevenson challenge was so one never has a sense of whether Eisenhower's handling of the dual crises in October 1956 required political calculations because his re-election was at stake. In short, the reader is often left with little sense of the forest because of the tedious focus on certain trees.
Āłł_Ÿøūrš
I recently read Lynne Olson's Troublesome Young Men: The Rebels Who Brought Churchill to Power and Helped Save England (which was a well researched, well written book). In the postscript of that book, Ms. Olson mentioned how Anthony Eden, who became Britain's Prime Minister in the mid-1950s drew the precisely wrong lesson in handling concerns about the Suez Canal from Chamberlain's mishandling of the Nazi threat in the late 1930s. I realized that I knew very little about the Suez crisis of 1955-1956 and looked for a book that would educate me in that matter.
Eisenhower 1956 is also a very well researched book that provides great insight into Eisenhower's worldview and effectiveness as President. 1955 and 1956 were certainly crucial years in his presidency. He suffered a significant heart attack near the end of 1955 and required major surgery for a digestive problem in early 1956. Accordingly, serious questions arose as to whether he should run for re-election in 1956. Also, the dynamics of the situation in the Middle-East changed significantly when Egypt's new ruler, Gamal Nassar, nationalized the Suez Canal and had Egypt take over operation of it from France and Britain as a way to pay for the Aswan Dam project after the Western allies withdrew offers to finance it.
In the meantime, while Eisenhower's health issues limited the hours that he could work, France and Britain involved Israel in a plan to take back control of the Suez Canal while misleading the US about their intentions.
When France and Britain went forward with their plan just before the 1956 election, the Soviet Union was in the process of putting down the brave efforts by Hungary to withdraw from the Soviet bloc. France and Britain's Suez misadventure then allowed the Soviets to get a military foothold in the Middle East via Syria such that the US's ability to intervene in the Hungarian situation was seriously compromised. Eisenhower's handling of all of these problems amid a campaign for re-election are carefully detailed in this book leaving no doubt but that Eisenhower was a thoughtful, pragmatic, effective President whose major efforts to minimize the likelihood of a nuclear war while maintaining the US's standing in the world were impressive.
The problem with this book is that the author feels the need to show off his research so that it bogs down with endless minutia about Eisenhower's golf games, the itinerary and scheduling of meetings, Eisenhower's health situation virtually day by day. This book could have benefited significantly from the involvement of a good editor. In addition, the attention to the day to day activities as between Eisenhower and his Secretary of State John Foster Dulles results in a myopic focus that results in a less than clear cut sense of the situation in Hungary. Similarly, while the author provides a helpful picture of Eisenhower's handling of the 1956 election campaign, one is not provided with any sense of how serious the Stevenson challenge was so one never has a sense of whether Eisenhower's handling of the dual crises in October 1956 required political calculations because his re-election was at stake. In short, the reader is often left with little sense of the forest because of the tedious focus on certain trees.