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The Strange Death of the Soviet Empire epub download

by David Pryce-Jones


The author interviewed former members of the Politburos and Central Committees of most of the Soviet Socialist Republics, to learn what happened at the top levels in the last weeks and hours of communist rule. In virtually every case, the top man asked the Red Army to put down a local, anti-communist uprising, and Gorbachev refused.

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Format Hardback 456 pages.

Pryce-Jones (The Closed Circle, 1989, et., who was for many years a correspondent in the Soviet Union for the Daily Telegraph, has written a strange and intriguing book on what is perhaps the central event of our time. Traveling extensively throughout the country, meeting people high and low, Pryce-Jones leads us to the inevitable conclusion that the only thing unusual about the death of the Soviet empire was that it caught the West by surprise.

David Pryce-Jones: journalist and author of The Closed Circle (An Interpretation of the Arabs), The War That Never Was (The Fall of the Soviet Empire) aka The Strange Death of the Soviet Union, You Cant be to. .

David Pryce-Jones: journalist and author of The Closed Circle (An Interpretation of the Arabs), The War That Never Was (The Fall of the Soviet Empire) aka The Strange Death of the Soviet Union, You Cant be too Careful and Unity Mitford (A Quest). David Pryce-Jones, "The War That Never Was",David Pryce-Jones, "The Closed Circle", Pryce Jones, "An Interpretation of the Arabs", David Pryce Jones, "The Fall of the Soviet Empire", David Pryce-Jones, "The Strange Death of the Soviet Union", David Pryce-Jones, Inheritance, Pryce-Jones, "Unity Mitford", David Pryce-Jones, Betrayal, "France, the Jews, and the Arabs".

Death and Redemption offers a fundamental reinterpretation of the role of the Gulag-the Soviet Union's .

Death and Redemption offers a fundamental reinterpretation of the role of the Gulag-the Soviet Union's vast system of forced-labor camps, internal exile, and prisons-in Soviet society. Soviet authorities undoubtedly had the means to exterminate all the prisoners who passed through the Gulag, but unlike the Nazis they did not conceive of their concentration camps as instruments of genocide. In this provocative book, Steven Barnes argues that the Gulag must be understood primarily as a penal institution where prisoners were given one final chance to reintegrate into Soviet society.

Fine in Fine DJ. ISBN: 0805041540 (Soviet Union). A Curious Man: The Strange & Brilliant Life Of Robert Believe It Or Not Ripley. Gerson, Noel B. Franklin: America's Lost State.

Regarding the fall of the Soviet empire as a challenging mystery, a historical study considers such questions as why Gorbachev did not . Used availability for David Pryce-Jones's The Strange Death of the Soviet Empire.

Regarding the fall of the Soviet empire as a challenging mystery, a historical study considers such questions as why Gorbachev did not resort to classic armed enforcement tactics and what role the West played in the events.

In his 1989 book The Closed Circle, Pryce-Jones examined what he considered to be the reasons for the backward state of the Arab world. The Strange Death of the Soviet Empire (1995). The War that Never Was: The Fall of the Soviet Empire 1985–1991 (1995). You Can’t be Too Careful (1992).

The Soviet empire did die a strange death . As challenges to Moscow’s hegemony rolled across Eastern Europe in 1989, many observers anticipated that the Kremlin would unleash a terrible wave of repression. Nevertheless, Pryce-Jones succeeds in weaving together their words with his own probing analysis; the resulting composite portrait consistently deepens our understanding of one of the greatest and least bloody revolutions of modern times. One theme that surfaces throughout this book is the loss of faith and fervor among Soviet and East European Communist-party elites.

Regarding the fall of the Soviet empire as a challenging mystery, a historical study considers such questions as why Gorbachev did not resort to classic armed enforcement tactics and what role the West played in the events. Tour.

The Strange Death of the Soviet Empire epub download

ISBN13: 978-0805041545

ISBN: 0805041540

Author: David Pryce-Jones

Category: Social Sciences

Subcategory: Politics & Government

Language: English

Publisher: Henry Holt & Co (September 1, 1995)

Pages: 456 pages

ePUB size: 1773 kb

FB2 size: 1970 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 730

Other Formats: rtf lrf azw mobi

Related to The Strange Death of the Soviet Empire ePub books

Onaxan
Very informative tells the true facts of what happened in the USSR
Onaxan
Very informative tells the true facts of what happened in the USSR
Super P
The commonly accepted theory for the disintegration of the USSR is that Ronald Reagan brilliantly increased American military spending, knowing that the Soviets would match the American effort, and drive themselves into bankruptcy. This book decisively rebuts that claim.

The author interviewed former members of the Politburos and Central Committees of most of the Soviet Socialist Republics, to learn what happened at the top levels in the last weeks and hours of communist rule. In virtually every case, the top man asked the Red Army to put down a local, anti-communist uprising, and Gorbachev refused. While many of the SSRs were "third world" countries, and economically weak, economics had nothing to do with the downfall of even one of them.
Super P
The commonly accepted theory for the disintegration of the USSR is that Ronald Reagan brilliantly increased American military spending, knowing that the Soviets would match the American effort, and drive themselves into bankruptcy. This book decisively rebuts that claim.

The author interviewed former members of the Politburos and Central Committees of most of the Soviet Socialist Republics, to learn what happened at the top levels in the last weeks and hours of communist rule. In virtually every case, the top man asked the Red Army to put down a local, anti-communist uprising, and Gorbachev refused. While many of the SSRs were "third world" countries, and economically weak, economics had nothing to do with the downfall of even one of them.
Hellmaster
Without sentiment or any sense of loss, David Pryce-Jones chronicles the fall of European communism through a journalist's eye and the eyewitness accounts of the rulers, dissidents and apparatchiks who were there.
This is a powerful book, for it harbors no illusions that the Soviet Union was any kind of "workers' state" or that communism, as an ideal or a practicality, had any legitimacy as a form of government.
In Pryce-Jones' analysis, if anything caused communism's downfall, it was the misplaced reasoning that a regime built on fear, terror and corruption could stand up to glasnost and perestroika. By their own admission in the book, most of the nomenklatura in Russia and its Eastern European satellites understood this. Mikhail Gorbachev, in an attempt to reform the system, exposed its basic illegitimacy and brought it crashing down.
With the former Communist bloc now open to greater investigation into its history, Pryce-Jones' book provides a great deal of illumination into Kremlin and Warsaw Pact politics during the late 1980s. For instance, while Gorbachev was being courted by the West, he was being reviled as a traitor by his own cabinet and allies. One of the more tantalizing questions Pryce-Jones leaves unresolved is whether Gorbachev indeed knew the consequences of perestroika would be the break-up of the USSR and the end of its occupation of Eastern Europe. The author interviews participants in the failed August 1991 coup, which essentially ended Communist Party rule in Russia, who openly wonder if Gorbachev instigated it as a calculated risk to flush out any remaining hard-line opposition.
Parts of the book read like a political thriller. As the gradual revolution in Eastern Europe and the Baltics takes hold, Pryce-Jones' sources take us into Round Table meetings and back room conferences where, quite literally, the fates of nations were being decided. The author compares the way popular resistance grew in the wake of Gorbachev's reforms and-in telling detail-shows! that Gorbachev essentially disallowed the use of Soviet forces to sustain control in any of the satellites. Only in Romania did the tanks roll, and that proved disasterous in the end as Ceaucescu became the only Communist ruler to be executed.
More pointedly, we get the inside stories of how leaders aging leaders like Poland's General Jaruzelski and East Germany's Honecker. in the end, lacked the will to enforce their rule through armed repression. Some of the most exciting material concerns the last days before the Berlin Wall fell, where we see Honecker fuming over Gorbachev's refusal to order Hungary to close its border-through which thousands of East Germans were escaping, and the growing tension over the Leipzig "prayer meetings," which had become weekly mass demonstrations against the government.
Throughout his reporting, Pryce-Jones is not afraid to make judgments. One of his sharpest is against the American and Western European Intellectual Left, which he views as doing much to perpetuate the belief that Communism was as legitimate a political system as democracy and that the Cold War was little more than a face-off between two superpowers that, at the bottom line, were essentially the same. His heroes, on the other hand, are Margaret Thatcher, Ronald Reagan, the dissidents in Russia, the Baltics and all of Eastern Europe, and the long line of West German chancellors who resisted domestic and international pressure to withdraw from NATO, a long-term strategic objective of the Kremlin.
It is too bad that right now, "The Strange Death of the Soviet Union" is out of print. One would hope that it is still available from the U.K. It is an invaluable contribution to history and deserves reading by anyone interested in learning the kitchen details about how communism fell.
Hellmaster
Without sentiment or any sense of loss, David Pryce-Jones chronicles the fall of European communism through a journalist's eye and the eyewitness accounts of the rulers, dissidents and apparatchiks who were there.
This is a powerful book, for it harbors no illusions that the Soviet Union was any kind of "workers' state" or that communism, as an ideal or a practicality, had any legitimacy as a form of government.
In Pryce-Jones' analysis, if anything caused communism's downfall, it was the misplaced reasoning that a regime built on fear, terror and corruption could stand up to glasnost and perestroika. By their own admission in the book, most of the nomenklatura in Russia and its Eastern European satellites understood this. Mikhail Gorbachev, in an attempt to reform the system, exposed its basic illegitimacy and brought it crashing down.
With the former Communist bloc now open to greater investigation into its history, Pryce-Jones' book provides a great deal of illumination into Kremlin and Warsaw Pact politics during the late 1980s. For instance, while Gorbachev was being courted by the West, he was being reviled as a traitor by his own cabinet and allies. One of the more tantalizing questions Pryce-Jones leaves unresolved is whether Gorbachev indeed knew the consequences of perestroika would be the break-up of the USSR and the end of its occupation of Eastern Europe. The author interviews participants in the failed August 1991 coup, which essentially ended Communist Party rule in Russia, who openly wonder if Gorbachev instigated it as a calculated risk to flush out any remaining hard-line opposition.
Parts of the book read like a political thriller. As the gradual revolution in Eastern Europe and the Baltics takes hold, Pryce-Jones' sources take us into Round Table meetings and back room conferences where, quite literally, the fates of nations were being decided. The author compares the way popular resistance grew in the wake of Gorbachev's reforms and-in telling detail-shows! that Gorbachev essentially disallowed the use of Soviet forces to sustain control in any of the satellites. Only in Romania did the tanks roll, and that proved disasterous in the end as Ceaucescu became the only Communist ruler to be executed.
More pointedly, we get the inside stories of how leaders aging leaders like Poland's General Jaruzelski and East Germany's Honecker. in the end, lacked the will to enforce their rule through armed repression. Some of the most exciting material concerns the last days before the Berlin Wall fell, where we see Honecker fuming over Gorbachev's refusal to order Hungary to close its border-through which thousands of East Germans were escaping, and the growing tension over the Leipzig "prayer meetings," which had become weekly mass demonstrations against the government.
Throughout his reporting, Pryce-Jones is not afraid to make judgments. One of his sharpest is against the American and Western European Intellectual Left, which he views as doing much to perpetuate the belief that Communism was as legitimate a political system as democracy and that the Cold War was little more than a face-off between two superpowers that, at the bottom line, were essentially the same. His heroes, on the other hand, are Margaret Thatcher, Ronald Reagan, the dissidents in Russia, the Baltics and all of Eastern Europe, and the long line of West German chancellors who resisted domestic and international pressure to withdraw from NATO, a long-term strategic objective of the Kremlin.
It is too bad that right now, "The Strange Death of the Soviet Union" is out of print. One would hope that it is still available from the U.K. It is an invaluable contribution to history and deserves reading by anyone interested in learning the kitchen details about how communism fell.