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Sarajevo: A War Journal epub download

by Zlatko Dizdarevic


Sarajevo: A War Journal Paperback – November 1, 1994. Dizdarevic does a good job of showing the terror of everyday life in Sarajevo. What struck me about this book is how the population slowly accomodated itself to random shootings and starvation.

Sarajevo: A War Journal Paperback – November 1, 1994. by. Zlatko Dizdarevic (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. As the population adjusted itself, you can feel the anger welling up inside the author against the world leaders and the UN.

Start by marking Sarajevo: A War Journal as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. In any event, there's a sad hopefulness to Zlatko Dizdarevic's writing and an almost comic observation of things out of place in an environment like Sarajevo in the 90s. Like a watchmaker's shop being open.

Sarajevo : a war journal. Dizdarević, Zlatko. New York : Fromm International. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana.

Originally written as columns for a Croatian newspaper, Sarajevo vividly describes a life in which unspeakable horrors are daily occurrences.

An Amazing, Shocking Journal of the Balkan Conflict! Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 16 years ago. The man who wrote this book wrote from his heart, not merely his head. He gave insights that only a true 'survivor' of modern-day war could give. Beautifully written and powerfully emotional, this book is life-changing. Chilling journal of siege's first 16 months. Published by Thriftbooks.

Sarajevo, A War Journal, a book by Zlatko Dizdarevic. Quote:"A Sarajevo court has convicted a Bosnian Serb soldier of committing war crimes against prisoners but acquitted him of killing the country's deputy prime minister

Sarajevo, A War Journal, a book by Zlatko Dizdarevic. Sarajevo Days, Sarajevo Nights, a book by Elma Softic. Sarajevo, Exodus of a City, a book by Dzevad Karahasan. Sarajevo Roses, a book by South African UN Peacekeeper Anne-Marie Du Preez Bedroz. Quote:"A Sarajevo court has convicted a Bosnian Serb soldier of committing war crimes against prisoners but acquitted him of killing the country's deputy prime minister. Goran Vasić was sentenced to 4½ years in prison, local media reported. He was convicted on charges of beating prisoners at the Medjarici camp in Sarajevo during the country's 1992–1995 war.

Mr. Dizdarevic discussed his new book which describes his experiences as a journalist in Bosnia during the civil war.

Appearances by Title:c. Sarajevo: A War Journal. Mr. H. ee all appearances.

He is the author of Sarajevo: A War Journal and Portraits of Sarajevo. Bosnia and Herzegovina, CEI National Coordinator, Central European Initiative. Winner of 1993 Bruno Kreisky Prize. Winner of the 1992 Reporters Sans de France prize.

Sarajevo : A War Journal by Dizdarevic, Zlatko. Free US Delivery ISBN: 0805035354.

Fantastiskt mingel med Nordiska Filmgruppen igår, organiserat av Benjamin Dizdarević och Selma Caglar Imas

Fantastiskt mingel med Nordiska Filmgruppen igår, organiserat av Benjamin Dizdarević och Selma Caglar Imas. 40 personer deltog och delade mig sig av sin kunskap och sina erfarenheter i filmbranschen med resterande medlemmar. Följ nyhetsflödet för att ta del av nästa mingel som kommer att ske om en månad! Dizdarevic Film AB added an event. 23 October ·. SAT, 9 NOV.

Personal accounts describe life in a city under seige

Sarajevo: A War Journal epub download

ISBN13: 978-0805035353

ISBN: 0805035354

Author: Zlatko Dizdarevic

Category: Social Sciences

Subcategory: Politics & Government

Language: English

Publisher: Henry Holt & Co; 1st Owl Book ed edition (November 1, 1994)

Pages: 208 pages

ePUB size: 1785 kb

FB2 size: 1914 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 271

Other Formats: mbr docx txt rtf

Related to Sarajevo: A War Journal ePub books

Dalallador
. . . that young intellectuals use to abuse their suburban parents. The format is thoughtful, each chapter being a martyr’s screed of about five hundred words. The author is clearly reveling in the chaos that he professes to abhor. While I am sure that what is written is true I suspect that in reality the tone was more akin to a snide clique of young people determined to be hipper than thou toward anyone they meet her after. Their credibility hinges on some degree of veracity and I do not there are psychopaths pitched into the affair to facilitate some bloodshed. Where the tipping point between hip humanitarianism and senseless atrocity is cannot be determined from this book. The whole affair seems dirty and I do not blame most of the world for turning a blind eye to this embarrassment.

Taken with a grain of salt there are tidbits of writing here and there that make this book worth reading. If you are looking for a moving account of human endurance in the face of savage atrocity Elie Wiesel is still the best writer to consult. (Two and a half out of five stars)
Dalallador
. . . that young intellectuals use to abuse their suburban parents. The format is thoughtful, each chapter being a martyr’s screed of about five hundred words. The author is clearly reveling in the chaos that he professes to abhor. While I am sure that what is written is true I suspect that in reality the tone was more akin to a snide clique of young people determined to be hipper than thou toward anyone they meet her after. Their credibility hinges on some degree of veracity and I do not there are psychopaths pitched into the affair to facilitate some bloodshed. Where the tipping point between hip humanitarianism and senseless atrocity is cannot be determined from this book. The whole affair seems dirty and I do not blame most of the world for turning a blind eye to this embarrassment.

Taken with a grain of salt there are tidbits of writing here and there that make this book worth reading. If you are looking for a moving account of human endurance in the face of savage atrocity Elie Wiesel is still the best writer to consult. (Two and a half out of five stars)
Marige
Dizdarevic does a good job of showing the terror of everyday life in Sarajevo. What struck me about this book is how the population slowly accomodated itself to random shootings and starvation. As the population adjusted itself, you can feel the anger welling up inside the author against the world leaders and the UN. UN troops sat around and did nothing. These troops were Canadians and French who watched Serb troops shoot down innocent civilians. When the Bosnians tried to defend themselves, these same UN troops issued veiled threats against these defenses. It just goes to show the spineless foreign policy of the UN and those who provide troops for these peace keeping missions.
The reader can feel the anger of the author for the war criminals who terrorized the civilians of Sarajevo. These criminals (Ratko Mladic, Zivota Panic, Vojislav Seselj, Radovan Karadzic). The U.S. needs to bring these criminals to justice.
The reason why I rated this only a four star is because of the introduction by New York Times writer Robert Jay Lifton. Lifton provides us with an introduction where he equates the nuclear weapons policy of the U.S. with genocide. This is typical liberal drivel. This book would have been better without Lifton's crap in it. That said, the book was a good read about man's inhumanity to man.
Marige
Dizdarevic does a good job of showing the terror of everyday life in Sarajevo. What struck me about this book is how the population slowly accomodated itself to random shootings and starvation. As the population adjusted itself, you can feel the anger welling up inside the author against the world leaders and the UN. UN troops sat around and did nothing. These troops were Canadians and French who watched Serb troops shoot down innocent civilians. When the Bosnians tried to defend themselves, these same UN troops issued veiled threats against these defenses. It just goes to show the spineless foreign policy of the UN and those who provide troops for these peace keeping missions.
The reader can feel the anger of the author for the war criminals who terrorized the civilians of Sarajevo. These criminals (Ratko Mladic, Zivota Panic, Vojislav Seselj, Radovan Karadzic). The U.S. needs to bring these criminals to justice.
The reason why I rated this only a four star is because of the introduction by New York Times writer Robert Jay Lifton. Lifton provides us with an introduction where he equates the nuclear weapons policy of the U.S. with genocide. This is typical liberal drivel. This book would have been better without Lifton's crap in it. That said, the book was a good read about man's inhumanity to man.
Thetalune
Written in the first years of the siege by an editor at Oslobodjenje, these poignant war stories, compelling descriptions, and perceptive reflections from a city under fire constitute one of the most authoritative testimonies of the entire Bosnian war. A powerful and often scathing articulation of Sarajevo's disillusionment with Western inaction and betrayal of international norms and values. (This short review is from "Book on Bosnia" published by The Bosnian Institute)
Thetalune
Written in the first years of the siege by an editor at Oslobodjenje, these poignant war stories, compelling descriptions, and perceptive reflections from a city under fire constitute one of the most authoritative testimonies of the entire Bosnian war. A powerful and often scathing articulation of Sarajevo's disillusionment with Western inaction and betrayal of international norms and values. (This short review is from "Book on Bosnia" published by The Bosnian Institute)
Delalbine
The author was an editor of Oslobodjenje, Sarajevo's independent newspaper that continued to publish daily throughout the 1992-1995 period that the city was besieged by Serb nationalist forces. The journal entries take in just the first 16 months of that siege. It is chilling to realize that the siege would continue for more than two years beyond the period covered by the journal-and that populations in some other cities and villages suffered even more than did Sarajevo's.
Delalbine
The author was an editor of Oslobodjenje, Sarajevo's independent newspaper that continued to publish daily throughout the 1992-1995 period that the city was besieged by Serb nationalist forces. The journal entries take in just the first 16 months of that siege. It is chilling to realize that the siege would continue for more than two years beyond the period covered by the journal-and that populations in some other cities and villages suffered even more than did Sarajevo's.
Vonalij
The man who wrote this book wrote from his heart, not merely his head. He gave insights that only a true 'survivor' of modern-day war could give. Beautifully written and powerfully emotional, this book is life-changing.
Vonalij
The man who wrote this book wrote from his heart, not merely his head. He gave insights that only a true 'survivor' of modern-day war could give. Beautifully written and powerfully emotional, this book is life-changing.
Swift Summer
I read this book in December 1995 while in Sarajevo on a humanitarian mission. One of the most dramatic experiences of my life was reading this book by evening, and then by day, walking the destroyed streets that Zlatko Dizdarevic wrote about. It is a brutal, tragic, beautifully-written firsthand account of what the people of Sarajevo and other parts of the former Yugoslavia have been through since 1991, while the world sits idly by. I recommend the book, and I recommend reading it in Sarajevo.
Swift Summer
I read this book in December 1995 while in Sarajevo on a humanitarian mission. One of the most dramatic experiences of my life was reading this book by evening, and then by day, walking the destroyed streets that Zlatko Dizdarevic wrote about. It is a brutal, tragic, beautifully-written firsthand account of what the people of Sarajevo and other parts of the former Yugoslavia have been through since 1991, while the world sits idly by. I recommend the book, and I recommend reading it in Sarajevo.
Jox
The stories of Sarajevo and Bosnia are breath taking. Mr. Dizdarevic brings to light the day to day struggle that so many residents of Sarajevo went through. Not only physically, but mentally as well. Sarajevo is a very beautiful city and is getting more beautiful as it gets rebuilt. I can not imagine what it would have been like to live these stories that Mr. Dizdarevic writes about. This is a must read book!
Jox
The stories of Sarajevo and Bosnia are breath taking. Mr. Dizdarevic brings to light the day to day struggle that so many residents of Sarajevo went through. Not only physically, but mentally as well. Sarajevo is a very beautiful city and is getting more beautiful as it gets rebuilt. I can not imagine what it would have been like to live these stories that Mr. Dizdarevic writes about. This is a must read book!