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Freedom and Federalism epub download

by Felix Morley


Freedom and Federalism~ is an intriguging perspective of federalism than and no. .Freedom and Federalism was first published in 1950's and offers an honest assessment of federalism since th.

Freedom and Federalism~ is an intriguging perspective of federalism than and no.Freedom and Federalism was first published in 1950's and offers an honest assessment of federalism since the inception of the American Republic in 1787.

Felix Morley’s Freedom and Federalism, which examines the root causes of the problem, was thus a pioneering achievement when it first appeared in 1959

Felix Morley’s Freedom and Federalism, which examines the root causes of the problem, was thus a pioneering achievement when it first appeared in 1959. No less relevant today, the book provides a perceptive diagnosis of the collapse of States’ rights in modern America; and it seeks the restoration of a constitutional balance between central and state authorities.

Other books he published after the war were The Power in the People (1949), The Foreign Policy of the United States (1951) and Freedom and Federalism (1959). Also published, in 1956, is his utopian novel Gumption Island.

Felix Muskett Morley. Haverford, Pennsylvania. Other books he published after the war were The Power in the People (1949), The Foreign Policy of the United States (1951) and Freedom and Federalism (1959). a b Weil, Martin (1982-03-15). Felix Morley, Scholar, Educator and Journalist, Dies at 88". The Washington Post. p. B4. ^ (3 April 1940). Felix Morley Named Head of Haverford, The New York Times. "Felix Morley Backs Wilkie".

Freedom and Federalism by. Felix Morley.

Felix Morley'sFreedom and Federalism,which examines the root causes of the problem, was thus a pioneering achievement when it first appeared in 1959

Felix Morley'sFreedom and Federalism,which examines the root causes of the problem, was thus a pioneering achievement when it first appeared in 1959. No less relevant today, the book provides a perceptive diagnosis of the collapse of States' rights in modern America; and it seeks the restoration of a constitutional balance between central and state authorities.

Despite the centralising tendencies of the American national government in the twentieth century, there have been surprisingly few books defending the federal system. This work examines the root causes of the problem. It also provides a perceptive diagnosis of the collapse of States' rights in modern America.

Federalism was central to Felix Morley's political thought because he regarded federalism as being essential to the protection of individual freedom in the United States. Federalism protects freedom, argued Morley, by limiting government, constraining the potential tyranny of a national majority, and reserving control over local affairs to local citizens. In turn, he believed that freedom is necessary for the maintenance of federalism.

Walter H. Bennett, "Freedom and Federalism.

Freedom and Federalism. Walter H. Felix Morley," The Journal of Politics 22, no. 3 (Au. 1960): 553-555.

Chicago: Henry Regnery Com pany, 1959.

Despite the centralizing tendencies of the American national government in the twentieth century, there have been surprisingly few books defending the federal system. Felix Morley's Freedom and Federalism, which examines the root causes of the problem, was thus a pioneering achievement when it first appeared in 1959.

No less relevant today, the book provides a perceptive diagnosis of the collapse of States' rights in modern America; and it seeks the restoration of a constitutional balance between central and state authorities.

Is federalism worth saving? "Its outstanding virtue," which is "the distinctively American contribution to political art," argues Morley, "is its facility in combining two naturally antagonistic conditions—the social condition of order, and the more personal condition of freedom." In the end, he concludes, the American government will fail unless these two conditions are reconciled.

Felix Morley (1894–1982), Pulitzer-Prize-winning author, journalist, and educator, was a Rhodes Scholar, editor of the Washington Post and Human Events, and President of Haverford College.

Freedom and Federalism epub download

ISBN13: 978-0913966860

ISBN: 091396686X

Author: Felix Morley

Category: Social Sciences

Subcategory: Politics & Government

Language: English

Publisher: Liberty Fund Inc.; 2nd edition (July 1, 1981)

Pages: 352 pages

ePUB size: 1598 kb

FB2 size: 1433 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 746

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Related to Freedom and Federalism ePub books

Danskyleyn
"Freedom & Federalism" should be a must read for every actual Conservative writer and Editor. I have recommended this book often, Stick with it. Mr. Morley begins slowly building his case for strict original construction (as a contract) as the only legitimate basis for interpreting the Constitution. No Right or Left simply the reality of honoring all of the contracts before or have flowed since.
To fully appreciate this book, I would suggest keeping your computer on & opened to the following website: //1828.mshaffer.com. This website will give you direct access to Webster's 1828 First American Dictionary. It is crucial to understand the meaning of the words used as the Framer's understood them. The very first word to look up is "Federal" to find out the basis of the original construction of the Constitution:
FED'ERAL, a. [from L. faedus, a league, allied perhaps to Eng. wed. L. vas, vadis, vador, vadimonium. See Heb. to pledge.]
1. Pertaining to a league or contract; derived from an agreement or covenant between parties, particularly between nations.
2. Consisting in a compact between parties, particularly and chiefly between states or nations; founded on alliance by contract or mutual agreement; as a federal government, such as that of the United States...
It is crucial to understand two other words - Contract and Ratification.

Mr. Morley, as have others such as Judge Abel Upshur, makes it clear the Constitution is a contract among the natural inheritors of the colonial titles (the Declaration of Independence ended America's Colonial period.) - as sovereign States. The 1783 - Treaty of Paris named the individual colonies as independent states: "Article 1st:
His Brittanic Majesty acknowledges the said United States, viz., New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, to be free sovereign and Independent States; that he treats with them as such, and for himself his Heirs & Successors, relinquishes all claims to the Government, Propriety, and Territorial Rights of the same and every Part thereof."

The States created the confederated republic as an umbrella to for self-protection of external threats and internal Trade & Border disputes. It was not the general government's role to punish the States as Mr. Hamilton laments in Federalist - 21.

Mr. Morley makes it clear that the Federal Government was founded by the States to act as their Agent. It was not the other way around as Mr. Lincoln wrongfully asserts in his "July 4th, 1861- Message to Congress in Special Session".

Mr. Morley puts a substantial dent in the nonsensical "Progressive" argument that secession by those States (by the process of un-ratification) no longer wishing to part of the confederation considered "Disunion"? Particularly, when one considers that the Constitutional convention of 1787 began the process of seceding from the Articles of Confederation?

This book continues on to examine how the Radical Republican Party - 1854 - 1872 destroyed State sovereignty and with it Federalism with the destruction of the 9th & 10th Amendments and the enactment (Not Ratification) of the first two Civil War Amendments....

For an understanding of the Marxist's basis of the Republican Party and Civil War -Try reading "Lincoln's Marxists" - ://www.amazon.com/Lincolns-Marxists-Al-Benson-Jr/dp/158980905X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1364141077&sr=1-1&keywords=Lincoln%27s+Marxists

I scoffed at that book. Until I read "Karl Marx - On America &The Civil War"
://www.amazon.com/Karl-Marx-America-Civil-Library/dp/0070480842/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1364141183&sr=1-1&keywords=Karl+marx+on+the+american+civil+war

It might also be helpful to know that Marx & Engels wrote for Horace Greeley's N.Y. Daily Tribune for nine years prior to the Civil War and that their editor Charles A. Dana became Edwin Stanton's right-hand man in Lincoln's War Department.

In addition to this book I would suggest reading any and all of Jack Rakove's books on our Founding.

To learn about the failure of post-Civil War Radical Republican Reconstruction try Claude Bower's "The Tragic Era".

There is a fundamental problem that is beginning to arise for Republican Party hacks who masquerade as Constitutional Conservatives - the Radical Left is beginning to brag about the coup they pulled off with the Election of 1860.
Here -"An Unfinished Revolution: Karl Marx and Abraham Lincoln"- by Abraham Lincoln (Author), Karl Marx (Author), Robin Blackburn (Editor, Introduction), Raya Dunaevskaya (Contributor), Friedrich Engels (Contributor) Available here: ://www.amazon.com/Unfinished-Revolution-Karl-Abraham-Lincoln/dp/1844677222/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1364141768&sr=1-1&keywords=an+unfinished+revolution+karl+marx+and+abraham+lincoln
Danskyleyn
"Freedom & Federalism" should be a must read for every actual Conservative writer and Editor. I have recommended this book often, Stick with it. Mr. Morley begins slowly building his case for strict original construction (as a contract) as the only legitimate basis for interpreting the Constitution. No Right or Left simply the reality of honoring all of the contracts before or have flowed since.
To fully appreciate this book, I would suggest keeping your computer on & opened to the following website: //1828.mshaffer.com. This website will give you direct access to Webster's 1828 First American Dictionary. It is crucial to understand the meaning of the words used as the Framer's understood them. The very first word to look up is "Federal" to find out the basis of the original construction of the Constitution:
FED'ERAL, a. [from L. faedus, a league, allied perhaps to Eng. wed. L. vas, vadis, vador, vadimonium. See Heb. to pledge.]
1. Pertaining to a league or contract; derived from an agreement or covenant between parties, particularly between nations.
2. Consisting in a compact between parties, particularly and chiefly between states or nations; founded on alliance by contract or mutual agreement; as a federal government, such as that of the United States...
It is crucial to understand two other words - Contract and Ratification.

Mr. Morley, as have others such as Judge Abel Upshur, makes it clear the Constitution is a contract among the natural inheritors of the colonial titles (the Declaration of Independence ended America's Colonial period.) - as sovereign States. The 1783 - Treaty of Paris named the individual colonies as independent states: "Article 1st:
His Brittanic Majesty acknowledges the said United States, viz., New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, to be free sovereign and Independent States; that he treats with them as such, and for himself his Heirs & Successors, relinquishes all claims to the Government, Propriety, and Territorial Rights of the same and every Part thereof."

The States created the confederated republic as an umbrella to for self-protection of external threats and internal Trade & Border disputes. It was not the general government's role to punish the States as Mr. Hamilton laments in Federalist - 21.

Mr. Morley makes it clear that the Federal Government was founded by the States to act as their Agent. It was not the other way around as Mr. Lincoln wrongfully asserts in his "July 4th, 1861- Message to Congress in Special Session".

Mr. Morley puts a substantial dent in the nonsensical "Progressive" argument that secession by those States (by the process of un-ratification) no longer wishing to part of the confederation considered "Disunion"? Particularly, when one considers that the Constitutional convention of 1787 began the process of seceding from the Articles of Confederation?

This book continues on to examine how the Radical Republican Party - 1854 - 1872 destroyed State sovereignty and with it Federalism with the destruction of the 9th & 10th Amendments and the enactment (Not Ratification) of the first two Civil War Amendments....

For an understanding of the Marxist's basis of the Republican Party and Civil War -Try reading "Lincoln's Marxists" - ://www.amazon.com/Lincolns-Marxists-Al-Benson-Jr/dp/158980905X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1364141077&sr=1-1&keywords=Lincoln%27s+Marxists

I scoffed at that book. Until I read "Karl Marx - On America &The Civil War"
://www.amazon.com/Karl-Marx-America-Civil-Library/dp/0070480842/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1364141183&sr=1-1&keywords=Karl+marx+on+the+american+civil+war

It might also be helpful to know that Marx & Engels wrote for Horace Greeley's N.Y. Daily Tribune for nine years prior to the Civil War and that their editor Charles A. Dana became Edwin Stanton's right-hand man in Lincoln's War Department.

In addition to this book I would suggest reading any and all of Jack Rakove's books on our Founding.

To learn about the failure of post-Civil War Radical Republican Reconstruction try Claude Bower's "The Tragic Era".

There is a fundamental problem that is beginning to arise for Republican Party hacks who masquerade as Constitutional Conservatives - the Radical Left is beginning to brag about the coup they pulled off with the Election of 1860.
Here -"An Unfinished Revolution: Karl Marx and Abraham Lincoln"- by Abraham Lincoln (Author), Karl Marx (Author), Robin Blackburn (Editor, Introduction), Raya Dunaevskaya (Contributor), Friedrich Engels (Contributor) Available here: ://www.amazon.com/Unfinished-Revolution-Karl-Abraham-Lincoln/dp/1844677222/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1364141768&sr=1-1&keywords=an+unfinished+revolution+karl+marx+and+abraham+lincoln
Jum
~Freedom and Federalism~ is an intriguging perspective of federalism than and now... Felix Morley was a prominent conservative journalist and editor for Human Events. Freedom and Federalism was first published in 1950's and offers an honest assessment of federalism since the inception of the American Republic in 1787. "Federalism," affirms Morley, "is a distinctively American contribution to political art," which makes the reconciliation of liberty and order possible. He also critiques 'democracy' and 'democratism' with a brutally honest and prudent wisdom, which makes Morley a brilliant citizen-statesmen in the spirit of the founding fathers.

"In Morley's eyes," the cover notes, "a government of free men is like a strong-standing arch. The solid stones of which it is built is called freedom. Neither the building blocks of individual liberty nor the arch of freedom will stand secure without the keystone of federalism. It is federalism that holds up the arch. It is federalism that makes possible the preservation of both liberty and freedom. And the name of the arch is Republic-not Democracy." This book affirms that America was founded as a Republic, not a Democracy. Edmund Randolph avows, "The general object," of the constitutional convention, was "to provide a cure for the evils under which the United States labored; that in tracing these evils to their origin, every man had found it in the turbelence and follies of democracy." "The U.S. was conceived and framed as a constitutionally limited federal republic with limits not only on the powers of government but on that of majority rule. Succinctly stated, the fundamental purpose of government was to protect life, liberty and property. The founders were weary of unchecked democracy, majoritarian tyranny and the redistributive threat that democracy posed to property rights. In an absolute democracy, everything is potentially up for a vote, including your God-given natural rights. Under republican government, the rule of law is supreme and the rights of the individual are paramount. Thus, as Morley recognizes, the founders made few concessions to democracy and sought to localize it. Even Thomas Jeffesron, purported to be the most 'democratic' of the founders recognizes that "A democracy [is] the only pure republic, but impracticable beyond the limits of a town."

Morley analyzes Rousseau's concept of the "general will," which is a pretense for legitimizing majoritarian tyranny under the auspices of 'totalitarian democracy.' He points out how the design of federalism thwarts a general will. Morley also has no delusions of grandeur about federalism today. (Note that this book was written in the 1950's.) He rightly recognizes a steady erosion of original intent and the principles of federalism has led to centralization and a precariously unconstitutional balance of power between the federal government and states. It is little wonder that the word 'federal' has taken on a pejorative context while exemplifying centralization and bureaucracy. The word 'Federal' was derived from the Latin 'Foedus,' which translates to 'covenant' and thus 'Federalism' and 'Constitutionalism' goes hand in hand.

The culmination of big government machinations such as the Civil War, Reconstruction, New Deal, and the Great Society has usurped the constitutional order and has in many cases reduced the states to mere creatures of the federal government. Morley offers insights on historical developments such as the the Civil War, the problems presented by the 14th Amendment for jurisprudence, the nationalizing effects of commercialization, war preparation, empire building which began after the Civil War and went full circle under Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson.
Jum
~Freedom and Federalism~ is an intriguging perspective of federalism than and now... Felix Morley was a prominent conservative journalist and editor for Human Events. Freedom and Federalism was first published in 1950's and offers an honest assessment of federalism since the inception of the American Republic in 1787. "Federalism," affirms Morley, "is a distinctively American contribution to political art," which makes the reconciliation of liberty and order possible. He also critiques 'democracy' and 'democratism' with a brutally honest and prudent wisdom, which makes Morley a brilliant citizen-statesmen in the spirit of the founding fathers.

"In Morley's eyes," the cover notes, "a government of free men is like a strong-standing arch. The solid stones of which it is built is called freedom. Neither the building blocks of individual liberty nor the arch of freedom will stand secure without the keystone of federalism. It is federalism that holds up the arch. It is federalism that makes possible the preservation of both liberty and freedom. And the name of the arch is Republic-not Democracy." This book affirms that America was founded as a Republic, not a Democracy. Edmund Randolph avows, "The general object," of the constitutional convention, was "to provide a cure for the evils under which the United States labored; that in tracing these evils to their origin, every man had found it in the turbelence and follies of democracy." "The U.S. was conceived and framed as a constitutionally limited federal republic with limits not only on the powers of government but on that of majority rule. Succinctly stated, the fundamental purpose of government was to protect life, liberty and property. The founders were weary of unchecked democracy, majoritarian tyranny and the redistributive threat that democracy posed to property rights. In an absolute democracy, everything is potentially up for a vote, including your God-given natural rights. Under republican government, the rule of law is supreme and the rights of the individual are paramount. Thus, as Morley recognizes, the founders made few concessions to democracy and sought to localize it. Even Thomas Jeffesron, purported to be the most 'democratic' of the founders recognizes that "A democracy [is] the only pure republic, but impracticable beyond the limits of a town."

Morley analyzes Rousseau's concept of the "general will," which is a pretense for legitimizing majoritarian tyranny under the auspices of 'totalitarian democracy.' He points out how the design of federalism thwarts a general will. Morley also has no delusions of grandeur about federalism today. (Note that this book was written in the 1950's.) He rightly recognizes a steady erosion of original intent and the principles of federalism has led to centralization and a precariously unconstitutional balance of power between the federal government and states. It is little wonder that the word 'federal' has taken on a pejorative context while exemplifying centralization and bureaucracy. The word 'Federal' was derived from the Latin 'Foedus,' which translates to 'covenant' and thus 'Federalism' and 'Constitutionalism' goes hand in hand.

The culmination of big government machinations such as the Civil War, Reconstruction, New Deal, and the Great Society has usurped the constitutional order and has in many cases reduced the states to mere creatures of the federal government. Morley offers insights on historical developments such as the the Civil War, the problems presented by the 14th Amendment for jurisprudence, the nationalizing effects of commercialization, war preparation, empire building which began after the Civil War and went full circle under Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson.