» » Nature: Student Bargain Edition

Nature: Student Bargain Edition epub download

by Ralph Waldo Emerson,Sam Torode


Ralph Waldo Emerson's Nature is perhaps the greatest original work of philosophy written by an American.

Ralph Waldo Emerson's Nature is perhaps the greatest original work of philosophy written by an American.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) was a philosopher, poet, and lecturer. He is author of a humorous novel, The Dirty Parts of the Bible, and Everyday Emerson: The Wisdom of Ralph Waldo Emerson Paraphrased. Nature, Ralph Waldo Emerson's first book, is his manifesto and thus the birth of Transcendentalism and true American Romanticism. It got little initial attention but has come to be seen as one of his major works.

By: Ralph Waldo Emerson, American Renaissance Books. Narrated by: Sam Torode. Length: 1 hr and 11 mins.

Format: Global Grey free PDF, epub, Kindle ebook Pages (PDF): 41 Publication Date: 1836. Nature is an essay that puts forth the foundation of transcendentalism, a belief system that espouses a non-traditional appreciation of nature.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, lecturer, philosopher, and poet who led the transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century

Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, lecturer, philosopher, and poet who led the transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. He was seen as a champion of individualism and a prescient critic of the countervailing pressures of society, and he disseminated his thoughts through dozens of published essays and more than 1,500 public lectures across the United States.

Sam Torode creates books that entertain, inform, and inspire

Sam Torode creates books that entertain, inform, and inspire. It's not often that a Frank Sinatra song calls to mind a Ralph Waldo Emerson passage, but this struck me as a perfect pairing: "Standing on the bare ground, my head bathed by the blithe air, and uplifted into infinite space, all mean egotism vanishes. On a Clear Day (You Can See Forever).

by Ralph Waldo Emerson First published 1836. Published September 9th 2010 by Createspace Independent Publishing Platform. ISBN: 1448696488 (ISBN13: 9781448696482).

Lowest price and Replacement Guarantee.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) is known best in the twenty-first century as a literary innovator and early architect of American intellectual culture, but his writings still offer spiritual sustenance to the thoughtful reader. The Spiritual Emerson, orig. The American Transcendentalists: Essential Writings. by Lawrence Buell · Amos Bronson Alcott · Louisa May Alcott · Samuel Taylor Coleridge · Ralph Waldo Emerson · Margaret Fuller · Nathaniel Hawthorne · Elizabeth Peabody · Henry David Thoreau.

Ralph Waldo Emerson's Nature is perhaps the greatest original work of philosophy written by an American. This edition includes over 20 black-and-white photographs and a foreword on the origins and significance the book. These features--at a low price--make this the perfect edition of Emerson's masterpiece for students. Also available in a larger, full-color Deluxe Illustrated Edition: search for ISBN 1448696488. Also available as an Audible audiobook from American Renaissance Books.

Nature: Student Bargain Edition epub download

ISBN13: 978-1448698295

ISBN: 1448698294

Author: Ralph Waldo Emerson,Sam Torode

Category: Social Sciences

Subcategory: Philosophy

Language: English

Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (September 3, 2009)

Pages: 86 pages

ePUB size: 1432 kb

FB2 size: 1320 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 264

Other Formats: rtf azw mbr azw

Related to Nature: Student Bargain Edition ePub books

Gralinda
I love how the philosophical words of Emerson have been made timeless and modern with these beautiful photos and this presentation. This short book (76 pages) juxtaposes ancient and modern ideas in a very attractive and thought-provoking way. Emerson's ideas are prophetic and the editor, Sam Torode, has written an insightful forward and afterword.

This booklet is shorter and more beautiful than I had anticipated, which means I will be rereading it often.
Gralinda
I love how the philosophical words of Emerson have been made timeless and modern with these beautiful photos and this presentation. This short book (76 pages) juxtaposes ancient and modern ideas in a very attractive and thought-provoking way. Emerson's ideas are prophetic and the editor, Sam Torode, has written an insightful forward and afterword.

This booklet is shorter and more beautiful than I had anticipated, which means I will be rereading it often.
Melipra
I loved this book, an dreadingn it made me feel connected to myself and the world in a different way.
Melipra
I loved this book, an dreadingn it made me feel connected to myself and the world in a different way.
Ironrunner
Awesome transaction. A+
Ironrunner
Awesome transaction. A+
Arcanefist
Really, I'm certain that it isn't the book, it's just me. I think I just am not interested in pondering at this time.
Arcanefist
Really, I'm certain that it isn't the book, it's just me. I think I just am not interested in pondering at this time.
Manris
Nature, Ralph Waldo Emerson's first book, is his manifesto and thus the birth of Transcendentalism and true American Romanticism. It got little initial attention but has come to be seen as one of his major works. Though not as famous or acclaimed as later Emerson, it is of great significance not only historically but in terms of his career and the many he influenced. It is remarkable just how much of his writing is here in embryo; in a large sense, he spent the rest of his career refining this. Many key concepts are here: nature's all-encompassing beauty and force, our place in regard to it, art's role, and of course deduction of God from nature. Some speculations are more philosophical, historical, or critical, but all lead to these basic points, which are Transcendentalism's cornerstones. Emerson's characteristically optimistic thought is here in full, as is his signature poetic prose. He now unfortunately has the reputation of being somewhat impenetrable or simply impractical, but it is important to realize that he wrote for the masses; unlike nearly all philosophers, he did not rely on jargon or polysyllables. Time has of course obscured him somewhat, but he is still notably accessible compared to others. Yet his writing has a rare beauty rarely approached in any prose, much less philosophy; it is often as close to poetry as prose can be. That Emerson enjoyed writing - perhaps not the drudgery but certainly the exploration - is clear; he often works himself up to such a pitch that he positively rhapsodizes, producing near-lyrical beauty even when writing about the most abstract metaphysics. Nature has a consummate example - the "transparent eyeball," perhaps his most famous passage. The book has much to tell us even after all these years, and it is indeed somewhat ironic that factors ostensibly making it archaic - greater industrialization, ever-expanding technology, deforestation, etc. - in many ways make it really more relevant than ever. It is quite simply essential for anyone even remotely interested in Emerson or Transcendentalism - nay, American literature or history themselves.

Nature is widely anthologized, meaning this standalone is perhaps not ideal. However, it has an Introduction and Afterword - and even color photos - to make it more attractive. All must decide if this makes it worthwhile, but the important thing is to read Nature in some form.
Manris
Nature, Ralph Waldo Emerson's first book, is his manifesto and thus the birth of Transcendentalism and true American Romanticism. It got little initial attention but has come to be seen as one of his major works. Though not as famous or acclaimed as later Emerson, it is of great significance not only historically but in terms of his career and the many he influenced. It is remarkable just how much of his writing is here in embryo; in a large sense, he spent the rest of his career refining this. Many key concepts are here: nature's all-encompassing beauty and force, our place in regard to it, art's role, and of course deduction of God from nature. Some speculations are more philosophical, historical, or critical, but all lead to these basic points, which are Transcendentalism's cornerstones. Emerson's characteristically optimistic thought is here in full, as is his signature poetic prose. He now unfortunately has the reputation of being somewhat impenetrable or simply impractical, but it is important to realize that he wrote for the masses; unlike nearly all philosophers, he did not rely on jargon or polysyllables. Time has of course obscured him somewhat, but he is still notably accessible compared to others. Yet his writing has a rare beauty rarely approached in any prose, much less philosophy; it is often as close to poetry as prose can be. That Emerson enjoyed writing - perhaps not the drudgery but certainly the exploration - is clear; he often works himself up to such a pitch that he positively rhapsodizes, producing near-lyrical beauty even when writing about the most abstract metaphysics. Nature has a consummate example - the "transparent eyeball," perhaps his most famous passage. The book has much to tell us even after all these years, and it is indeed somewhat ironic that factors ostensibly making it archaic - greater industrialization, ever-expanding technology, deforestation, etc. - in many ways make it really more relevant than ever. It is quite simply essential for anyone even remotely interested in Emerson or Transcendentalism - nay, American literature or history themselves.

Nature is widely anthologized, meaning this standalone is perhaps not ideal. However, it has an Introduction and Afterword - and even color photos - to make it more attractive. All must decide if this makes it worthwhile, but the important thing is to read Nature in some form.