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Blood Moon Over Bengal epub download

by Morag McKendrick Pippin


Blood Moon Over Bengal book. Not only is Morag McKendrick Pippin/Elspeth McKendrick a fabulous friend, but she is an extremely gifted Author. Her characters and settings are vivid while her stories are compelling.

Blood Moon Over Bengal book. I highly recommend her novels!

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Blood Moon Over Bengal is a wonderful book filled with suspense and sexual tension. It's a must read for all Romantic Suspense readers. I'm looking forward to more books from Morag McKendrick Pippin in the near future. I loved it! Published by Thriftbooks

Blood Moon Over Bengal is a wonderful book filled with suspense and sexual tension. I loved it! Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 14 years ago. Set in Calcutta, State of Bengal, 1932

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Morag McKendrick Pippin, author of Blood Moon Over Bengal. Phantoms and Fantasies is a magical story of love, passion, and healing that will have readers hanging on to every word. 5 Angels, Recommended Read "Annie Rayburn has penned a wonderful book and interesting characters, which will have readers looking for more of her books. Angel Brewer, Romance Junkies.

Morag McKendrick Pippin has written: 'Blood Moon over Britain'. Mairi Hedderwick has written 29 books. These include the popular children's series Katie Morag and other children's literature such as The Tale of Carpenter MacPheigh and The Utterly Otterlys. What has the author Morag Fullarton written? Morag Fullarton has written: 'The tenant'. She has also written various volumes of travel writing accompanied by her own illustrations.

I enjoyed your first novel, Blood Moon Over Bengal last year and have been looking forward to what you’d write about next. I’m glad to say this one is just as good if not better. I think the war time setting is great and well done.

Blood Moon Over Bengal by Morag McKendrick Pippin.

Contributed by ybeeshepherd. The Bronze Horseman by Paullina Simons. Set in the Soviet Union during WWII. The first book does not have an HEA, but ybeeshepherd says the series ultimately ends happily. Blood Moon Over Bengal by Morag McKendrick Pippin.

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Returning to Bengal, India, to reunite with her estranged father, a British colonel, headstrong Elizabeth Mainwarring meets her match in Major Covington-Singh, a prince and soldier who stands accused of murder. Original.

Blood Moon Over Bengal epub download

ISBN13: 978-0843954524

ISBN: 0843954523

Author: Morag McKendrick Pippin

Category: Romance

Subcategory: Historical

Language: English

Publisher: Leisure Books; First Edition edition (October 31, 2004)

Pages: 337 pages

ePUB size: 1871 kb

FB2 size: 1592 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 947

Other Formats: rtf lit doc lrf

Related to Blood Moon Over Bengal ePub books

Daiktilar
A fun read. There are occasional spots where it read as if the author did lots of research into what was going on in the world during the time period and really wanted to get it onto the page, so characters talk about it in ways that didn't feel natural to me, but overall the mystery and the romance kept me reading, and I enjoyed the end result.
Daiktilar
A fun read. There are occasional spots where it read as if the author did lots of research into what was going on in the world during the time period and really wanted to get it onto the page, so characters talk about it in ways that didn't feel natural to me, but overall the mystery and the romance kept me reading, and I enjoyed the end result.
GODMAX
An interesting look at a time and place not much known to American Romance readers today.
GODMAX
An interesting look at a time and place not much known to American Romance readers today.
DABY
Very modern Elizabeth Mainwarring has stopped of in British control India on her way to New Zealand to see her father, man who she has not seen many years. While there she meets Major Nigel Covington-Singh an prince and a member of her father's regiment. Soon Elizabeth and Nigel become involved in a passionate affair. But there is danger all around them and their new love may not be able to protect them from it.
"Blood Moon Over Bengal" by Morag McKendrick Pippin was not a good, as least to me. I found the characters not that interesting and the storyline very boring. I just couldn't relate to them and I was forcing myself to finish the book. Others may have enjoyed "Blood Moon Over Bengal" but I was not one of them.
DABY
Very modern Elizabeth Mainwarring has stopped of in British control India on her way to New Zealand to see her father, man who she has not seen many years. While there she meets Major Nigel Covington-Singh an prince and a member of her father's regiment. Soon Elizabeth and Nigel become involved in a passionate affair. But there is danger all around them and their new love may not be able to protect them from it.
"Blood Moon Over Bengal" by Morag McKendrick Pippin was not a good, as least to me. I found the characters not that interesting and the storyline very boring. I just couldn't relate to them and I was forcing myself to finish the book. Others may have enjoyed "Blood Moon Over Bengal" but I was not one of them.
Cyregaehus
I would have bought Blood Moon Over Bengal just because of its setting. I mean, how often do you get a romance novel set in 1930s India? But the storyline sounded interesting, too, kind of like one of those old MM Kaye Death In books.

I'm giving this one a very, very qualified recommendation. I had many issues, especially with the characterization and the writing, but the vivid setting and a romance and suspense subplot that became ok in the second half of the book, made up for it for me.

It's 1932 and heiress Elizabeth Mainwarring decides to have a go at reconciling with her estranged father before continuing on her way to her newly-inherited oil-rich sheep station in New Zealand. So off Elizabeth goes in her airplane to Calcutta, where her father holds an important military post.

The first person she meets when she crash-lands in the middle of a parade ground is officer Nigel Covington-Singh, son of an Indian maharaja and the English daughter of a duke. Elizabeth and Nigel are immediately very attracted to each other, but even with Nigel's very high birth, interracial relationships are still a no-no in British India.

Adding to the tension is the fact that Calcutta is being terrorized by a serial killer, who, after some murders among the Indian population (which no one paid much attention to), has started targeting British women, especially those who dare have contact with men of a different race. The investigation into the killings falls to Nigel, who needs to find the truth between huge pressures to find an (Indian) culprit and fast, and the need to protect Elizabeth as their relationship develops, because this makes her a prime target for the killer.

Pippin is a new author and I think that even if I hadn't known that as I started the book, I would have figured it out. There's just a certain awkwardness there, especially in the initial sections of the book. I think my main problem was with the characterization, with how most characters felt like caricatures, rather than like real people. Their reactions were way over-the-top, and the dialogue felt stiff.

Also, for all that I found Pippin's portrayal of her setting and her exploration of the main issues of the time fascinating (and, in fact, I thought this was the very best thing about the book), I can't deny that at times, this just wasn't naturally integrated into the story. Sometimes (and especially at the beginning of the book) you could see the author's hand very clearly, as she introduced characters solely for the purpose of expounding at length about this or that, whether it was believable or not that they would do so, usually using slang that felt self-conscious to me.

The romance didn't start out well, either. I very much liked Elizabeth, but at first, I just couldn't "get" Nigel. My first impression of him was that he was a seriously angry man, and it got tiresome after a while, even if I do wholeheartedly agree that he had reason to be angry. Just not at Elizabeth! I also got tired of the constant miscommunication between them, with each time and again assuming the worst possible interpretation of the other's behaviour. Did Elizabeth not throw herself at Nigel the minute he made an advance at her? Why, she's obviously disgusted because he's Anglo-Indian!

Plus, there's a whole lot of telling and not showing in the romance. We're told about how Nigel is sooooo lusting after Elizabeth, but it's just that: told. I didn't feel it, didn't feel I was being shown that.

This improved as the story advanced, though, and by the end of the book, both the suspense and the romance had acquired momentum and were proceeding very naturally and enjoyably. Nigel mellowed quite a bit, and I was finally able to understand him more, and I liked his pursuit of Elizabeth. As for Elizabeth, I especially appreciated how she was very much a creature of her time... a woman with certain aspects I recognized as modern, but with certain attitudes which would seem old-fashioned now.

Even with those problems I had with it, I found BMOB very promising. Pippin's new book, Blood Moon Over Britain, is out already, and though it's not related to this one at all, in spite of the title, it's got a setting that's just as unique: WWII Britain. I'm so getting it!
Cyregaehus
I would have bought Blood Moon Over Bengal just because of its setting. I mean, how often do you get a romance novel set in 1930s India? But the storyline sounded interesting, too, kind of like one of those old MM Kaye Death In books.

I'm giving this one a very, very qualified recommendation. I had many issues, especially with the characterization and the writing, but the vivid setting and a romance and suspense subplot that became ok in the second half of the book, made up for it for me.

It's 1932 and heiress Elizabeth Mainwarring decides to have a go at reconciling with her estranged father before continuing on her way to her newly-inherited oil-rich sheep station in New Zealand. So off Elizabeth goes in her airplane to Calcutta, where her father holds an important military post.

The first person she meets when she crash-lands in the middle of a parade ground is officer Nigel Covington-Singh, son of an Indian maharaja and the English daughter of a duke. Elizabeth and Nigel are immediately very attracted to each other, but even with Nigel's very high birth, interracial relationships are still a no-no in British India.

Adding to the tension is the fact that Calcutta is being terrorized by a serial killer, who, after some murders among the Indian population (which no one paid much attention to), has started targeting British women, especially those who dare have contact with men of a different race. The investigation into the killings falls to Nigel, who needs to find the truth between huge pressures to find an (Indian) culprit and fast, and the need to protect Elizabeth as their relationship develops, because this makes her a prime target for the killer.

Pippin is a new author and I think that even if I hadn't known that as I started the book, I would have figured it out. There's just a certain awkwardness there, especially in the initial sections of the book. I think my main problem was with the characterization, with how most characters felt like caricatures, rather than like real people. Their reactions were way over-the-top, and the dialogue felt stiff.

Also, for all that I found Pippin's portrayal of her setting and her exploration of the main issues of the time fascinating (and, in fact, I thought this was the very best thing about the book), I can't deny that at times, this just wasn't naturally integrated into the story. Sometimes (and especially at the beginning of the book) you could see the author's hand very clearly, as she introduced characters solely for the purpose of expounding at length about this or that, whether it was believable or not that they would do so, usually using slang that felt self-conscious to me.

The romance didn't start out well, either. I very much liked Elizabeth, but at first, I just couldn't "get" Nigel. My first impression of him was that he was a seriously angry man, and it got tiresome after a while, even if I do wholeheartedly agree that he had reason to be angry. Just not at Elizabeth! I also got tired of the constant miscommunication between them, with each time and again assuming the worst possible interpretation of the other's behaviour. Did Elizabeth not throw herself at Nigel the minute he made an advance at her? Why, she's obviously disgusted because he's Anglo-Indian!

Plus, there's a whole lot of telling and not showing in the romance. We're told about how Nigel is sooooo lusting after Elizabeth, but it's just that: told. I didn't feel it, didn't feel I was being shown that.

This improved as the story advanced, though, and by the end of the book, both the suspense and the romance had acquired momentum and were proceeding very naturally and enjoyably. Nigel mellowed quite a bit, and I was finally able to understand him more, and I liked his pursuit of Elizabeth. As for Elizabeth, I especially appreciated how she was very much a creature of her time... a woman with certain aspects I recognized as modern, but with certain attitudes which would seem old-fashioned now.

Even with those problems I had with it, I found BMOB very promising. Pippin's new book, Blood Moon Over Britain, is out already, and though it's not related to this one at all, in spite of the title, it's got a setting that's just as unique: WWII Britain. I'm so getting it!
Gavirgas
Ever since watching the Masterpiece Theater dramatization of Paul Scott's Raj Quartet AKA The Jewel in the Crown, I've been interested in British Colonial India. So when I stumbled onto this book which takes place in the waning years of the British Raj (specifically 1932 Calcutta) I wouldn't have missed it! Murder mystery, imperialism, prejudice and forbidden love all combine for an enjoyable and interesting debut for this new author. Those who loved Scott's romance between English-educated Indian Hari Kumar and British born and raised Daphne Manners may also enjoy this story.

"Modern girl" Elizabeth Mainwarring has just recently inherited millions in addition to a sheep station in New Zealand on the death of her beloved mother. Elizabeth was born in India but her mother left her controlling, dictatorial, military man father when she was a child using malaria as her public reason for returning to England with her daughter. Now on her way to her inherited property in New Zealand, Elizabeth drops in (quite literally!) on her father's military compound in India to attempt reconciliation.

Major Nigel Covington-Singh is what is unkindly referred to in Brit circles, a "cheechee" or "blacky-white" meaning he is half Indian and half English. And even though his father is the Maharaja of Kashmir and his grandfather was the English Duke of Avesbury, he cannot escape the prejudice of the British with whom he works and lives among. When several Brahmin (Indian upper-class) women are savagely murdered Nigel is given the task of investigating the murders.

When his commanding officer's estranged daughter shows up quite unexpectedly, it shakes Nigel's world as he is very attracted to her. Unfortunately, there are two very good reasons that he cannot pursue her: one, she is the daughter of his boss; two, an English woman would be ruined if she consorted with an Indian man - no matter how exalted his family tree. It just is not done. But Elizabeth cannot understand such prejudice and Nigel cannot resist her and so a discreet (and steamy) romance begins. Things escalate when English women begin numbering among the killer's victims - especially women who have "consorted" with Indian men. Which makes it all the more imperative to keep their relationship under wraps and could put Elizabeth in danger. Can Nigel find the killer before another Englishwoman dies?

This is really more historical murder mystery than romance novel but I still enjoyed it as I love the setting and period in which the story takes place. If you are looking primarily for a romance, there may not be enough here for you. The murder mystery was well done as the author set up several plausible suspects and it took me a good while to figure out whodunit. And the author really brings India and the period to life for the reader. But I must say that toward the end she throws in a few unnecessary complications and sometimes she went on too long in describing fairly minor characters or situations and I found myself skimming. But I did enjoy this story and will likely check out her next book which will be set in WWII London. A promising new author.
Gavirgas
Ever since watching the Masterpiece Theater dramatization of Paul Scott's Raj Quartet AKA The Jewel in the Crown, I've been interested in British Colonial India. So when I stumbled onto this book which takes place in the waning years of the British Raj (specifically 1932 Calcutta) I wouldn't have missed it! Murder mystery, imperialism, prejudice and forbidden love all combine for an enjoyable and interesting debut for this new author. Those who loved Scott's romance between English-educated Indian Hari Kumar and British born and raised Daphne Manners may also enjoy this story.

"Modern girl" Elizabeth Mainwarring has just recently inherited millions in addition to a sheep station in New Zealand on the death of her beloved mother. Elizabeth was born in India but her mother left her controlling, dictatorial, military man father when she was a child using malaria as her public reason for returning to England with her daughter. Now on her way to her inherited property in New Zealand, Elizabeth drops in (quite literally!) on her father's military compound in India to attempt reconciliation.

Major Nigel Covington-Singh is what is unkindly referred to in Brit circles, a "cheechee" or "blacky-white" meaning he is half Indian and half English. And even though his father is the Maharaja of Kashmir and his grandfather was the English Duke of Avesbury, he cannot escape the prejudice of the British with whom he works and lives among. When several Brahmin (Indian upper-class) women are savagely murdered Nigel is given the task of investigating the murders.

When his commanding officer's estranged daughter shows up quite unexpectedly, it shakes Nigel's world as he is very attracted to her. Unfortunately, there are two very good reasons that he cannot pursue her: one, she is the daughter of his boss; two, an English woman would be ruined if she consorted with an Indian man - no matter how exalted his family tree. It just is not done. But Elizabeth cannot understand such prejudice and Nigel cannot resist her and so a discreet (and steamy) romance begins. Things escalate when English women begin numbering among the killer's victims - especially women who have "consorted" with Indian men. Which makes it all the more imperative to keep their relationship under wraps and could put Elizabeth in danger. Can Nigel find the killer before another Englishwoman dies?

This is really more historical murder mystery than romance novel but I still enjoyed it as I love the setting and period in which the story takes place. If you are looking primarily for a romance, there may not be enough here for you. The murder mystery was well done as the author set up several plausible suspects and it took me a good while to figure out whodunit. And the author really brings India and the period to life for the reader. But I must say that toward the end she throws in a few unnecessary complications and sometimes she went on too long in describing fairly minor characters or situations and I found myself skimming. But I did enjoy this story and will likely check out her next book which will be set in WWII London. A promising new author.