» » Beyond the Farthest Star

Beyond the Farthest Star epub download

by Edgar Rice Burroughs


Beyond the Farthest Star is a science fiction novel by American writer Edgar Rice Burroughs. The novel consists of two novellas, "Adventure on Poloda" and "Tangor Returns", written quickly in late 1940.

Beyond the Farthest Star is a science fiction novel by American writer Edgar Rice Burroughs. The first was published in The Blue Book Magazine in 1942, but the second did not see publication until 1964 when it was featured in Tales of Three Planets along with "The Resurrection of Jimber-Jaw" and The Wizard of Venus.

Читать онлайн Beyond The Farthest Star. Burroughs Edgar Rice. Edgar Rice Burroughs. Part I: ADVENTURE ON POLODA. Beyond The Farthest Star. We had attended a party at Diamond Head ; and after dinner, comfortable on hikiee and easy-chairs on the lanai, we fell to talking about the legends and superstitions of the ancient Hawaiians. There were a number of old-timers there, several with a mixture of Hawaiian and American blood, and we were the only malihinis-happy to be there, and happy to listen.

Burroughs likely intended Beyond the Farthest Star to be the opening of a new series comparable to the Barsoom or Pellucidar sequences, but declining health and Burroughs's World War II service as a war correspondent.

Burroughs likely intended Beyond the Farthest Star to be the opening of a new series comparable to the Barsoom or Pellucidar sequences, but declining health and Burroughs's World War II service as a war correspondent prevented this from happening. One fee. Stacks of books. Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline.

Beyond the Farthest Star book. I thought I had read all of Edgar Rice Burroughs books, and then I found this the other day when I was cleaning my office out. I couldn't remember reading it, and so read it again

Beyond the Farthest Star book. Cover Illustration: Jim Burns. I couldn't remember reading it, and so read it again. However I hadn't ever read it.

Edgar Rice Burroughs was a prolific American author of the 'pulp' era. The son of a Civil War veteran, he saw brief military service with the 7TH . Cavalry before he was diagnosed with a heart problem and discharged. After working for five years in his father's business, Burroughs left for a string of disparate and short-lived jobs, and was working as a pencil sharpener wholesaler when he decided to try his hand at writing.

Edgar Rice Burroughs. Magnifique!" ejaculated the Countess de Coude, beneath her breath. The Beasts of Tarzan is a novel by American writer Edgar Rice Burroughs, the third in his series of books about the title character Tarzan. Eh?" questioned the count, turning toward his young wife.

Beyond The Farthest Star. Author: Edgar Burroughs.

Edgar rice Burroughs is the master of Adventure Fiction! With Fantastic Series of Novels, Tarzan,John Carter of Mars, Carson of Venus and numerous other great Novels! You are Sure to enjoy this one bought to you at these.

Edgar rice Burroughs is the master of Adventure Fiction! With Fantastic Series of Novels, Tarzan,John Carter of Mars, Carson of Venus and numerous other great Novels! You are Sure to enjoy this one bought to you at these incredible savings for a limited time only! . Another fun Burroughs romp, elsewhere than Earth. This time the main character is a pilot, and he ends up on an alien world (not a big suprise, eh?) and proceeds to go about having some Buck Rogers style adventures, getting involved in politics and war. This is made up of two different stories/novellas, or whatever you want to call them. If you like other Burroughs style books, no reason you won't like this.

Download books for free.

Beyond the Farthest Star epub download

ISBN13: 978-0441056569

ISBN: 0441056563

Author: Edgar Rice Burroughs

Category: Romance

Subcategory: Fantasy

Language: English

Publisher: Ace Books (January 1, 1979)

ePUB size: 1501 kb

FB2 size: 1227 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 917

Other Formats: rtf txt lrf mobi

Related to Beyond the Farthest Star ePub books

SmEsH
Perhaps an explanation of the publishing history of Edgar Rice Burroughs's _Beyond the Farthest Star_ (1964) is in order. In 1942, Burroughs published a novelette of that title in _Blue Book_. He clearly intended the story to be the first of a new series of tales. He had drawn maps of his imaginary extra-solar planet Poloda, along with other planets in the solar system. He also wrote notes about the alphabet, language, social structure, and economic system of the natives of the planet.

Then in 1963, thirteen years after Bouroughs's death, ERB's son Hulbert discovered a number of unpublished papers by Burroughs. Many were little more than notes or outlines. But there were three complete novelettes. One of them, "Tangor Returns," was clearly a sequel to the first novelette. (It was probably first written between 1942 and 1943.) Burroughs referred in his notes to several more planned novelettes in the series, but it is unlikely that they were written. To date, no others have appeared.

The three novelettes were no doubt hastily written. Compared with _A Princess of Mars_ (1912) and _Tarzan of the Apes_ (1914), they are potboilers. But because of the attention that Burroughs gave to his setting, _Beyond the Farthest Star_ has a certain level of fun.

We open with Burroughs giving an account of how "ghostly fingers" load paper into a typewriter and type out an account of strange adventures while he is staying at Diamond Head, Hawaii. The typist is an unnamed American pilot who is shot down over Germany in 1939 and wakes up naked on the distant extra-solar world of Poloda.
SmEsH
Perhaps an explanation of the publishing history of Edgar Rice Burroughs's _Beyond the Farthest Star_ (1964) is in order. In 1942, Burroughs published a novelette of that title in _Blue Book_. He clearly intended the story to be the first of a new series of tales. He had drawn maps of his imaginary extra-solar planet Poloda, along with other planets in the solar system. He also wrote notes about the alphabet, language, social structure, and economic system of the natives of the planet.

Then in 1963, thirteen years after Bouroughs's death, ERB's son Hulbert discovered a number of unpublished papers by Burroughs. Many were little more than notes or outlines. But there were three complete novelettes. One of them, "Tangor Returns," was clearly a sequel to the first novelette. (It was probably first written between 1942 and 1943.) Burroughs referred in his notes to several more planned novelettes in the series, but it is unlikely that they were written. To date, no others have appeared.

The three novelettes were no doubt hastily written. Compared with _A Princess of Mars_ (1912) and _Tarzan of the Apes_ (1914), they are potboilers. But because of the attention that Burroughs gave to his setting, _Beyond the Farthest Star_ has a certain level of fun.

We open with Burroughs giving an account of how "ghostly fingers" load paper into a typewriter and type out an account of strange adventures while he is staying at Diamond Head, Hawaii. The typist is an unnamed American pilot who is shot down over Germany in 1939 and wakes up naked on the distant extra-solar world of Poloda.
Whitescar
Really goods
Whitescar
Really goods
Gavigamand
If you read Burroughs, you probably like good mindless adventure. At least this one doesn't take place on the moon, or mars or venus or jupiter or anywhere else that even scientists in Burrough's own time knew intelligent life couldn't exist. In this book, a dying flier is transported to a very distant world where the good guys(essentially Western Civilization) have been fighting the bad guys(think Stalin's Russia or Hitler's Germany) for about 100 years. HE joins the fight and, well, typical Burrough's action ensues. Good mindless action.
Gavigamand
If you read Burroughs, you probably like good mindless adventure. At least this one doesn't take place on the moon, or mars or venus or jupiter or anywhere else that even scientists in Burrough's own time knew intelligent life couldn't exist. In this book, a dying flier is transported to a very distant world where the good guys(essentially Western Civilization) have been fighting the bad guys(think Stalin's Russia or Hitler's Germany) for about 100 years. HE joins the fight and, well, typical Burrough's action ensues. Good mindless action.
Antuiserum
anyone who has not read this short novel should take the time to do so. Well worth obtaining, the work will not disappoint.
Antuiserum
anyone who has not read this short novel should take the time to do so. Well worth obtaining, the work will not disappoint.
Konetav
BEYOND THE FARTHEST STAR is an old story and a short one, but it is quite pleasing. A World War II pilot, probably British, is shot down behind German lines. Mysteriously and mystically he is transported half a million light years away to the planet Poloda. The human inhabitants call him Tangor, meaning "from nothing," because he appeared out of nowhere. Like Earth, Poloda is plagued by world war, and Tangor's experience as a pilot and his friendly manners gain him employment once again as a pilot.

Part II flows smoothly from Part I, and it is less an action story than an intriguing tale of espionage. But the ending is open. Since both parts were written in 1940, maybe a combination of wartime duty and failing health prevented Edgar Rice Burroughs from continuing. Or maybe he just lost interest in Tangor and Poloda. Anyway, no more typewritten text from the Tangor's ghost has been published. Even so, E.R.B. at least gets us through the story's latest crisis, and though I don't know how the series would have progressed, I am sure it would have ended happily.

The two parts of this novelette were "Beyond the Farthest Star" and "Tangor Returns." "Beyond the Farthest Star" was first published in BLUE BOOK magazine, January 1942. "Tangor Returns" has been published only posthumously, for the first time in TALES OF THREE PLANETS, a 1964 hardcover published by Canaveral Press. That book also contains "Beyond the Farthest Star" and two unrelated stories: "The Resurrection of Jimber-Jaw" and "The Wizard of Venus."

My reading for this review came from a 1964 paperback edition by Ace, with cover art by Frank Frazetta (the paperback and its reprints are still available inexpensively here at amazon and at AbeBooks). My book contains both "Adventure on Poloda" (a re-titling of "Beyond the Farthest Star") and "Tangor Returns." It also contains an introduction by Richard Lupoff, who wrote a well-received book, MASTER OF ADVENTURE, about Edgar Rice Burroughs and his stories. In the Ace introduction, Lupoff tells how "Tangor Returns" was left buried in Burroughs' archives until 1963, when Burroughs' son Hulbert discovered it.
Konetav
BEYOND THE FARTHEST STAR is an old story and a short one, but it is quite pleasing. A World War II pilot, probably British, is shot down behind German lines. Mysteriously and mystically he is transported half a million light years away to the planet Poloda. The human inhabitants call him Tangor, meaning "from nothing," because he appeared out of nowhere. Like Earth, Poloda is plagued by world war, and Tangor's experience as a pilot and his friendly manners gain him employment once again as a pilot.

Part II flows smoothly from Part I, and it is less an action story than an intriguing tale of espionage. But the ending is open. Since both parts were written in 1940, maybe a combination of wartime duty and failing health prevented Edgar Rice Burroughs from continuing. Or maybe he just lost interest in Tangor and Poloda. Anyway, no more typewritten text from the Tangor's ghost has been published. Even so, E.R.B. at least gets us through the story's latest crisis, and though I don't know how the series would have progressed, I am sure it would have ended happily.

The two parts of this novelette were "Beyond the Farthest Star" and "Tangor Returns." "Beyond the Farthest Star" was first published in BLUE BOOK magazine, January 1942. "Tangor Returns" has been published only posthumously, for the first time in TALES OF THREE PLANETS, a 1964 hardcover published by Canaveral Press. That book also contains "Beyond the Farthest Star" and two unrelated stories: "The Resurrection of Jimber-Jaw" and "The Wizard of Venus."

My reading for this review came from a 1964 paperback edition by Ace, with cover art by Frank Frazetta (the paperback and its reprints are still available inexpensively here at amazon and at AbeBooks). My book contains both "Adventure on Poloda" (a re-titling of "Beyond the Farthest Star") and "Tangor Returns." It also contains an introduction by Richard Lupoff, who wrote a well-received book, MASTER OF ADVENTURE, about Edgar Rice Burroughs and his stories. In the Ace introduction, Lupoff tells how "Tangor Returns" was left buried in Burroughs' archives until 1963, when Burroughs' son Hulbert discovered it.