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Cursed by a Happy Childhood: Letters from a Dad to a Daughter epub download

by Carl Lennertz


CURSED BY A HAPPY CHILDHOOD is Lennertz's first published work

CURSED BY A HAPPY CHILDHOOD is Lennertz's first published work. It consists of short pieces, most of them no more than 2-3 pages in length, which began as a kind of diary for his preteen daughter. The result is a mix of childhood memoirs from the 1950s and 1960s, observations and advice. One of its many strengths is its simplicity; you don't have to be a rocket scientist to read Lennertz. You do, however, have to pay attention.

Cursed by a Happy Childhood book. That’s exactly what Carl Lennertz does here, recollecting early experiences to which we can all relate: friendship and cliques, first job and first love, and having lots of time to do nothing at all. Ultimately, these reflections-some that will make you laugh out loud and some that will surely make you cringe-are about what we have in common with our children and what we know they have yet to learn. hopefully the easy way, which is to say lovingly, from us.

Cursed by a Happy Childhood is a warm, funny, bighearted collection of one dad's reminiscences about the kinds of. .

Cursed by a Happy Childhood is a warm, funny, bighearted collection of one dad's reminiscences about the kinds of lessons we all learn-sometimes the hard way, often without even realizing it-on the road to becoming a grown-up. The book began as a diary of sorts that Carl Lennertz wanted to keep for his eleven-year-old daughter, a way to let her know that he understood something about being a child and dealing with the milestones she would soon be approaching as a teenager.

Cursed by a Happy Childhood Tales of Growing Up, Then and Now by Carl Lennertz and Publisher Harmony. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9781400081110, 1400081114. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9781400050451, 1400050456. You are currently visiting our US store. You may visit any one of our stores by selecting a country below. Note that the availability of products for purchase is based on the country of your billing address. Some items may have regional restrictions for purchase. Canadian customers may purchase from our stores in Canada or the US. Canada.

New York : Harmony Books. A warm, funny bighearted collection of one dad's reminiscences about the kinds of lessons we all learn. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana.

Letters from a Father to His Daughter is a collection of letters written by Jawaharlal Nehru to his daughter Indira Priyadarshini, originally published in 1929 by Allahabad Law Journal Press at Nehru's request and consisting of only the 30 lette.

Cursed by a Happy Childhood is a warm, funny, bighearted collection of one dad’s reminiscences about the kinds of lessons we all learn-sometimes the hard . Cursed by a Happy Childhood : Letters from a Dad to a Daughter.

Cursed by a Happy Childhood is a warm, funny, bighearted collection of one dad’s reminiscences about the kinds of lessons we all learn-sometimes the hard way,.

Электронная книга "Promises I Made My Mother", Sam Haskell, David Rensin

Электронная книга "Promises I Made My Mother", Sam Haskell, David Rensin. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Promises I Made My Mother" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

For every parent who ever wondered if they were smart enough, resourceful enough, and just plain good enough to tackle one of the most important jobs in the world.No one ever is, of course, but perhaps the secret to somehow pulling it off lies in telling ourselves again the true stories of our own childhood, as filtered through our less innocent but inevitably wiser eyes. That’s exactly what Carl Lennertz does here, recollecting early experiences to which we can all relate: friendship and cliques, first job and first love, and having lots of time to do nothing at all. Ultimately, these reflections—some that will make you laugh out loud and some that will surely make you cringe—are about what we have in common with our children and what we know they have yet to learn . . . hopefully the easy way, which is to say lovingly, from us. Cursed by a Happy Childhood is a warm, funny, big-hearted reminder that the little moments are the big moments, that we should share our stories and take heart in the way they make us feel a little closer to one another, a little stronger, and a little happier to face each day.

Cursed by a Happy Childhood: Letters from a Dad to a Daughter epub download

ISBN13: 978-0307336217

ISBN: 0307336212

Author: Carl Lennertz

Category: Relationships and Parenting

Subcategory: Family Relationships

Language: English

Publisher: Harmony; Reprint edition (August 8, 2006)

Pages: 224 pages

ePUB size: 1973 kb

FB2 size: 1840 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 456

Other Formats: azw mbr lrf docx

Related to Cursed by a Happy Childhood: Letters from a Dad to a Daughter ePub books

Anaginn
How can you not pick up a book with a title this great? And what a blessed relief it is to finally read a memoir in which the author has not spent half his life on a therapist's couch because of something his parents may have said to him when he was five years old!
Author Carl Lennertz has written a marvelous collection of wise and witty essays that compare his near-idyllic childhood in a small town on Long Island in the 1960's to the hurly-burly of raising a young pre-teen daughter in present-day New York City. For anyone who grew up in America during the 1960's, this book contains a veritable cornucopia of immediately recognizable impressions, experiences and events from that memorable era. And anyone who has ever been (or plans to be) a parent will find comfort, laughter and pure delight in Lennertz's often hilarious (and instructive) conclusions about the fine art of childrearing.
Lennertz sometimes rants but he never whines, and the rants are invariably amusing and frequently insightful. He often concentrates on the smaller joys in life -- the delights of eating corn on the cob, of spending a day at the beach, of bodysurfing the perfect wave, of afternoons spent exploring on bicycle, of going to that first big league baseball game. He reminds us of the "particular and peculiar pleasure of moving a record player arm up and over, of putting the needle down, just so, at the edge of a large vinyl disk, and of hearing that slight hiss in the thin slice of time before the first song."
In the end, it is the wholesome small town values that Lennertz came to appreciate years after growing up that now inform his deliberations as a father. Though today's world may be faster, louder and more cluttered with technology, Lennertz manages to appreciate the advantages of the past and the present, of small town life and the pace of the big city.
PS: If you're a parent worried that your children may be watching too much TV, you'll find the chapter entitled "TV Money," an especially clever method of making them voluntarily eschew the small screen. But you'll have to read the book. My lips are sealed.
Anaginn
How can you not pick up a book with a title this great? And what a blessed relief it is to finally read a memoir in which the author has not spent half his life on a therapist's couch because of something his parents may have said to him when he was five years old!
Author Carl Lennertz has written a marvelous collection of wise and witty essays that compare his near-idyllic childhood in a small town on Long Island in the 1960's to the hurly-burly of raising a young pre-teen daughter in present-day New York City. For anyone who grew up in America during the 1960's, this book contains a veritable cornucopia of immediately recognizable impressions, experiences and events from that memorable era. And anyone who has ever been (or plans to be) a parent will find comfort, laughter and pure delight in Lennertz's often hilarious (and instructive) conclusions about the fine art of childrearing.
Lennertz sometimes rants but he never whines, and the rants are invariably amusing and frequently insightful. He often concentrates on the smaller joys in life -- the delights of eating corn on the cob, of spending a day at the beach, of bodysurfing the perfect wave, of afternoons spent exploring on bicycle, of going to that first big league baseball game. He reminds us of the "particular and peculiar pleasure of moving a record player arm up and over, of putting the needle down, just so, at the edge of a large vinyl disk, and of hearing that slight hiss in the thin slice of time before the first song."
In the end, it is the wholesome small town values that Lennertz came to appreciate years after growing up that now inform his deliberations as a father. Though today's world may be faster, louder and more cluttered with technology, Lennertz manages to appreciate the advantages of the past and the present, of small town life and the pace of the big city.
PS: If you're a parent worried that your children may be watching too much TV, you'll find the chapter entitled "TV Money," an especially clever method of making them voluntarily eschew the small screen. But you'll have to read the book. My lips are sealed.
Reighbyra
A delightful book! Mr. Lennertz has managed (with great fluidity) to touch on so many of the joys, fears, and rites-of-passage of childhood in the sixties, and place them in the perspective of today's parenting challenges. Being a kid isn't really all that different now, despite the apparent changes in the world. Not to mislead, this not a 'how-to' book; the author does not pretend to have the 'answer'. But, if you are a parent, you may be pleasantly surprised to find that, as you share the colorful stories woven by Mr. Lennertz in this book, some of your own answers emerge! Enjoy it, and enjoy your children!
Reighbyra
A delightful book! Mr. Lennertz has managed (with great fluidity) to touch on so many of the joys, fears, and rites-of-passage of childhood in the sixties, and place them in the perspective of today's parenting challenges. Being a kid isn't really all that different now, despite the apparent changes in the world. Not to mislead, this not a 'how-to' book; the author does not pretend to have the 'answer'. But, if you are a parent, you may be pleasantly surprised to find that, as you share the colorful stories woven by Mr. Lennertz in this book, some of your own answers emerge! Enjoy it, and enjoy your children!
CrazyDemon
I grew up in the same area and must say that Carl's reminisces made me happily homesick. Great descriptive writing and charming object lessons add up to a delightful read.
CrazyDemon
I grew up in the same area and must say that Carl's reminisces made me happily homesick. Great descriptive writing and charming object lessons add up to a delightful read.
Akinonris
I gave myself 4 stars out of modesty. I couldn't do 3, could I? Anyway, this paperback is just out and I'm thrilled with the new cover. I hope that lots of daughters will buy this book for themselves and for the old man, and you old guys, that you'll read it for a few laughs and bit of nostalgia. Check out the 45 record labels!
Akinonris
I gave myself 4 stars out of modesty. I couldn't do 3, could I? Anyway, this paperback is just out and I'm thrilled with the new cover. I hope that lots of daughters will buy this book for themselves and for the old man, and you old guys, that you'll read it for a few laughs and bit of nostalgia. Check out the 45 record labels!
Kata
Recently, as the result of a number of circumstances, I've been woolgathering about the past, specifically my childhood and teenage years. Maybe I've spent too much time on it, but it's something I've needed to do. It is somewhat ironic then that CURSED BY A HAPPY CHILDHOOD should be published now. After reading it for the last few hours I've felt as if Carl Lennertz, its author, has been tapping into my thoughts. I'm sure I won't be alone in feeling this way.
CURSED BY A HAPPY CHILDHOOD is Lennertz's first published work. It consists of short pieces, most of them no more than 2-3 pages in length, which began as a kind of diary for his preteen daughter. The result is a mix of childhood memoirs from the 1950s and 1960s, observations and advice. One of its many strengths is its simplicity; you don't have to be a rocket scientist to read Lennertz. You do, however, have to pay attention. Lennertz has a conversational style that is closer to listening to a friend discuss a far-off yet familiar land than a lecture from an elder about what's what. Another of Lennertz's strengths is his lack of pretension. He realizes that while things may be different "now" from the way they were "then," there are valuable life lessons that are as applicable in the present as they were in the past.
I had so many favorite pieces in CURSED BY A HAPPY CHILDHOOD that I can't mention them all. Of the ones that hit home the hardest, I probably laughed the most at "The Great Books Versus the Great Comic Books" because of a conversation I had recently with a friend. He asked me who I considered to be the best authors. I listed Thomas Wolfe, William Faulkner, Cormac McCarthy and Larry Brown. He laughed and told me he doubted that he would be reading any of them since he no longer read "homework" books. Lennertz doesn't go quite that far, but he does advise his daughter to put the serious stuff aside occasionally and escape. There's nothing wrong with that at all. I also enjoyed the nuggets that Lennertz drops throughout the book, such as "Show up, be on time and do your best" and "If those around you are bringing you down, move on." Words to live by!
Lennertz, as a bit of lagniappe, intersperses the text with photographs of 45 r.p.m. record labels that, if you are of a certain age, will have you both drooling and misty-eyed and that will add to, rather than interrupt, the flow of his narrative. Taken in its entirety, CURSED BY A HAPPY CHILDHOOD is by turns instructional and entertaining, a work that parents and children can buy for each other. I do have a minor quibble, however. The only piece in the book that I took serious issue with was a whimsical list entitled "Ten Things That Would Make Me A Cooler Dad." Carl, you wrote your daughter a book --- you can't get much cooler than that.
--- Reviewed by Joe Hartlaub
Kata
Recently, as the result of a number of circumstances, I've been woolgathering about the past, specifically my childhood and teenage years. Maybe I've spent too much time on it, but it's something I've needed to do. It is somewhat ironic then that CURSED BY A HAPPY CHILDHOOD should be published now. After reading it for the last few hours I've felt as if Carl Lennertz, its author, has been tapping into my thoughts. I'm sure I won't be alone in feeling this way.
CURSED BY A HAPPY CHILDHOOD is Lennertz's first published work. It consists of short pieces, most of them no more than 2-3 pages in length, which began as a kind of diary for his preteen daughter. The result is a mix of childhood memoirs from the 1950s and 1960s, observations and advice. One of its many strengths is its simplicity; you don't have to be a rocket scientist to read Lennertz. You do, however, have to pay attention. Lennertz has a conversational style that is closer to listening to a friend discuss a far-off yet familiar land than a lecture from an elder about what's what. Another of Lennertz's strengths is his lack of pretension. He realizes that while things may be different "now" from the way they were "then," there are valuable life lessons that are as applicable in the present as they were in the past.
I had so many favorite pieces in CURSED BY A HAPPY CHILDHOOD that I can't mention them all. Of the ones that hit home the hardest, I probably laughed the most at "The Great Books Versus the Great Comic Books" because of a conversation I had recently with a friend. He asked me who I considered to be the best authors. I listed Thomas Wolfe, William Faulkner, Cormac McCarthy and Larry Brown. He laughed and told me he doubted that he would be reading any of them since he no longer read "homework" books. Lennertz doesn't go quite that far, but he does advise his daughter to put the serious stuff aside occasionally and escape. There's nothing wrong with that at all. I also enjoyed the nuggets that Lennertz drops throughout the book, such as "Show up, be on time and do your best" and "If those around you are bringing you down, move on." Words to live by!
Lennertz, as a bit of lagniappe, intersperses the text with photographs of 45 r.p.m. record labels that, if you are of a certain age, will have you both drooling and misty-eyed and that will add to, rather than interrupt, the flow of his narrative. Taken in its entirety, CURSED BY A HAPPY CHILDHOOD is by turns instructional and entertaining, a work that parents and children can buy for each other. I do have a minor quibble, however. The only piece in the book that I took serious issue with was a whimsical list entitled "Ten Things That Would Make Me A Cooler Dad." Carl, you wrote your daughter a book --- you can't get much cooler than that.
--- Reviewed by Joe Hartlaub