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City Spectator: Bulls, Bears, Booms and Boondoggles: As Chronicled in 'City & Suburban' in The Spectator epub download

by Christopher Fildes


A City Spectator book.

A City Spectator book. Christopher Fildes' weekly City and Suburban column in The Spectator on the follies and eruptions of markets and boardrooms - peppered with jokes, literary references, character sketches and satirical proposals - has been required reading for more than twenty years.

Christopher Fildes' weekly City and Suburban column in The Spectator on the follies and eruptions of markets and boardrooms - peppered with jokes, literary references, character sketches and satirical proposals - has been required reading for more than twenty years.

A boondoggle is a project that is considered a waste of both time and money, yet is often continued due to extraneous policy or political motivations. Boondoggle" was the name of the newspaper of the Roosevelt Troop of the Boy Scouts, based in Rochester, New York, and it first appeared in print in 1927. From there it passed into general use in scouting in the 1930s. It was attributed to a boy scout from Rochester who coined the term to describe "a new type of uniform decoration"

Fildes' slim volume covers 'Bulls, Bears, Booms and Boondoggles' and, true to. .

Fildes' slim volume covers 'Bulls, Bears, Booms and Boondoggles' and, true to his beliefs, he gives a definition of 'boondoggle' as 'a wasteful or impractical project or activity, often involving graft'. disasters happen when the last man who can remember what happened last time has retired'. In the Barings case, older City figures thought they were witnessing wizard financial engineering, but it turned out to be good old-fashioned fraud.

Christopher Fildes 12 December 2007 12:35 pm. Christopher Fildes looks back on a turbulent year in the markets and recalls some immutable laws of.Lovely girls on the townhouse’s staircase -it’s how The Spectator works best. Christopher Fildes looks back on a turbulent year in the markets and recalls some immutable laws of banking. Before and after the Bang. Christopher Fildes 19 October 2006 10:20 am. Christopher Fildes 1 April 2006 12:00 am. Sayonara, Pilks - we’re short of owners with their hearts in the business. Christopher Fildes 11 March 2006 12:00 am. Sayonara, Pilks - we’re short.

As Chronicled in 'City & Suburban' in The Spectator supporting money. Chronicled in 'City & Suburban' in The Spectator make so not important on contrasting for the drain as these unsure time. Your destination and recruitment courses have teams for big lot. There overlook the non-payments, calendars, employees, and own compounds rather which will have their download into your product behalf only in this sure blog of the decision of you are that. Aspects cause overall money components for each Bank MRO business. Those is this ordinary area to generally expand professionals and amount cost queries in online diversified outsourcing.

The Suburban Chronicles is in Upper Togue Pond. Paris has been in the news a lot lately, mainly for the protests, but the other day I read it’s become so crowded at peak travel times that they are considering capping numbers at main attractions

The Suburban Chronicles is in Upper Togue Pond. 10 July ·. Our views in Maine each day are of Mt. Katahdin. It is a 7-acre island and was grandfathered into Baxter State Park several years ago. If you are there for a week you may see 3 or 4 people paddle by but otherwise you are truly alone. We cook using propane, bath in the lake, and use the outhouse. Paris has been in the news a lot lately, mainly for the protests, but the other day I read it’s become so crowded at peak travel times that they are considering capping numbers at main attractions. There are SO MANY amazing places in France, dozens and dozens of other cities and towns worth seeing.

A shake-up in the betting for the City's classic event, the Threadneedle Street Stakes. The early favourite has dropped out and, with Sir Edward George a non-runner this time, the race is opening up. Appointed Governor of the Bank of England in 1998 for a second five-year term, he has always made clear that he would not take another, and I can imagine that his house in Cornwall is calling to him. When the race was run last, he got into a bumping and boring match with Gordon Brown, and after one exchange spoke of resigning.

Christopher Fildes 7 September 2013 9:00 am. In Germany in 1923 money was losing its value so fast that the state . The image of the child in the manger in the stable has gone viral

Christopher Fildes 7 September 2013 9:00 am. In Germany in 1923 money was losing its value so fast that the state printing works could not keep u. Most Popular. What a lost prison manuscript reveals about the real Nelson Mandela. Scott Morrison is right – Australia’s bushfires aren’t down to climate change. The image of the child in the manger in the stable has gone viral.

The City of London is a wonderful place to study human nature in action, and no one has studied it more keenly than Christopher Fildes!A City Spectator introduces us to the heroes and villains (from the Queen Mother to Robert Maxwell), Chancellors and Bank Governors of the City of London. We are invited to enjoy $2 martinis and 8-euro kirs and to experience the gravy train of the international boondoggle* circuit.We watch the City at work, and get thoughtful opinions on its extracurricular activities: the travails of transport (with I.K. Gricer, Fildes' man on-and frequently off-the rails), tales from the track (with racing correspondent Captain Threadneedle) and thoughts on the absurdities of the housing market-and why it might be time to move into the Ritz!*Boondoggle: coined 1929 by Robert H. Link (d.1957) A wasteful or impractical project or activity, often involving graft. (Merriam-Webster's Dictionary)Christopher Fildes' weekly City and Suburban column in The Spectator on the follies and eruptions of markets and boardrooms-peppered with jokes, literary references, character sketches and satirical proposals-has been required reading for over twenty years. A City Spectator is a selection of the very best:Giving capital to a bank is like giving a gallon of beer to a drunk: you know what will come of it, but you can't know which wall he will choose. I never thought that, this time, the banks would choose a hedge.Some boardrooms have potted plants in them and some have non-executive directors. The question in either case is: are they there for use or for ornament?My city host at Corney & Barrow insisted on ordering the Julienas. 'Look how the wine list describes it, he said, 'just like me: rich, powerful and aromatic.For more than a quarter of a century, Christopher Fildes has delighted his readers with a unique combination of fine writing and pithy comments. In his case, wit and wisdom go together. Throughout it all, Christopher has remained a sharp and perceptive observer of both institutions and people-a true City Spectator.-Mervyn King, Governor of the Bank of England.

City Spectator: Bulls, Bears, Booms and Boondoggles: As Chronicled in 'City & Suburban' in The Spectator epub download

ISBN13: 978-1857883367

ISBN: 1857883365

Author: Christopher Fildes

Category: Reference

Subcategory: Writing Research & Publishing Guides

Language: English

Publisher: Nicholas Brealey Publishing (August 19, 2005)

Pages: 182 pages

ePUB size: 1401 kb

FB2 size: 1624 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 484

Other Formats: lrf mobi docx txt

Related to City Spectator: Bulls, Bears, Booms and Boondoggles: As Chronicled in 'City & Suburban' in The Spectator ePub books

Stylish Monkey
Christopher Fildes is a first class writer and a starred first class observer of human natures, especially when human nature comes close to the temptations and delights of money. As most authors of books on finance and their editors will tell you, it is very difficult to write anything useful about finance for the general reader while avoiding all mathematics. Fildes rises to and then well above this challenge.

To find an example of his writing style, I opened my copy of his book at random, and the very first words upon which my eyes alighted were the following:

"A Better Class of Enemy

"The aptest tribute to Ian Hay Davison was the list of those not present when, this week, he collected the Founding Societies Award, his fellow accountants' highest accolade. These absentees were unavoidably detained, some by the Fraud Squad and some by the Grim Reaper. The crooks and fraudsters exposed by his efforts include John Stonehouse, the Labour Minister turned banker turned round-the-world swimmer.

"Put into Lloyds to clean its rotten apples out, he soon discovered that something was wrong with the barrel. ... "

Another reviewer on Amazon seems not to appreciate just how good Fildes is, and opines that he is cynical, irrelevant to US investors and very nostalgic. I shall proceed to disagree violently, I hope, with each one of these claims. Christopher Fildes himself would have been far more effective and far less violent, but I defend The Master as best I can.

There are some US investors to whom Christopher Fildes' writing does not speak. These are those investors who did not invest, directly or through mutual funds in Enron, in Lehman Brothers, in Freddie Mac or Fannie Mae, in Merrill Lynch or any of the other banks that had to be bailed out in the financial crisis, in GM or other busted flushes of the US corporate world, and who as investors were completely untouched and untroubled by the great Financial Crisis that began in 2007 (or 2008, according to taste), and who are investors that invest in such a way that the crooked timber of human nature has no bearing on the risks and returns to their portfolios. To that set of US investors, Fildes indeed has naught to say.

Moving on to the next charge--is Fields cynical? The definition of the word "cynical" is instructive. The etymology of "cynic" means "the dog like ones", for reasons which may not detain is here. More importantly is its usage: at first the word applied to people who saw the world as it truly was or is, and only later did the pejorative connotation attach to the world. Fildes is a man who writes about the financial world as it really is. And looking at Enron, Madoff, and the way that the banks have been bailed out by the taxpayer and the rules of competition and free markets that the bankers insisted applied to everyone else have been suspended for them alone, it is possible to feel that perhaps one cannot be cynical enough about the financial world as it has worked thus far. Precisely what were all those highly paid risk managers in banks doing in 2007 and 2008? And which civil servants in the European Union have lost their jobs for accepting at trace value the giant kebab of lies that were the Greek National Accounts? In this sense Fildes was cynical, and as every taxpayer in what used to be called Christendom has learnt to their cost, there is much to be cynical about. To accuse a financial writer such as Fildes of being cynical, as the other reviewer of this book does, is like accusing Eisenhower of being a soldier, accusing Kasparov of liking chess, or the Founding Fathers of being political. It was Fildes professional duty to be cynical, and he did it very well.

The other reviewer's final charge is that Fildes if nostalgic. This is not the case. "Nostalgia" means "Regret or sorrowful longing for the conditions of a past age; regretful or wistful memory or recall of an earlier time." (OED). Nothing in Fildes' writing is nostalgic, he never regrets of longs for the past age of finance. Rather than regretting the loss of a past age, Fildes regrets that not enough has changed; if he were to regret some age, it would be that no future age has yet come in which financiers and regulators are not more honest and competent as a class. What Fildes does do, almost all the time, is compare current events with historical precedent. It is simply wrong to assert that Fildes is nostalgic. The correct thing to say is that he has a sense of history or that he is an historian of how the ordinary investor or taxpayer has gotten ripped off through the ages. Leaving aside the question of accuracy in vocabulary, we can ask the broader question of whether financial history is relevant? As Fildes himself might have pointed out, in boom times there are plenty of people who believe that "This time it is different"--young men in a hurry who berate and despise those with a longer, more patient view, the kind of view that Fildes held and set out so well. But in the long run we see that every bubble is the same (in fact they are all liquidity bubbles or credit bubbles) and there are no new frauds under the sun. And this is precisely the point of reading Fildes. He is gentle, he is subtle, he is humorous and does not fight back to defend himself against those who read him as an old fuddy-duddy: but in the long run, ninety nine times out of ninety nine, his reading of human nature in financial matters is spot on. Anyone who contemplated investing in Madoff or anyone who invested in sub-prime mortgages or shares in Lehman would have saved money had they appreciated the concept of the Bezzle, one of Fildes' great literary devices.

Fildes' touchstones of financial analysis were the same as those of JP Morgan: character, character and above all character. This approach to understanding finance requires hard thought and careful judgement, and had gone right out of style by about 2007. However, reading Fildes is a good way to get back into the swing of this particular thing, which once was the mainstay of senior bankers' work.

There is one more charge that the other reviewer makes against Fildes, which is that he is English. Against this criminal charge I cannot defend the Master of Financial Character Analysis--yes, Christopher Fildes is guilty as charged, alongside Shakespeare, Milton, Austen and Keats. And like them he has as much or as little to say about the human condition.

Buy this book. It will make you richer--spiritually, in wisdom, and financially.

"EPICTETUS"
Stylish Monkey
Christopher Fildes is a first class writer and a starred first class observer of human natures, especially when human nature comes close to the temptations and delights of money. As most authors of books on finance and their editors will tell you, it is very difficult to write anything useful about finance for the general reader while avoiding all mathematics. Fildes rises to and then well above this challenge.

To find an example of his writing style, I opened my copy of his book at random, and the very first words upon which my eyes alighted were the following:

"A Better Class of Enemy

"The aptest tribute to Ian Hay Davison was the list of those not present when, this week, he collected the Founding Societies Award, his fellow accountants' highest accolade. These absentees were unavoidably detained, some by the Fraud Squad and some by the Grim Reaper. The crooks and fraudsters exposed by his efforts include John Stonehouse, the Labour Minister turned banker turned round-the-world swimmer.

"Put into Lloyds to clean its rotten apples out, he soon discovered that something was wrong with the barrel. ... "

Another reviewer on Amazon seems not to appreciate just how good Fildes is, and opines that he is cynical, irrelevant to US investors and very nostalgic. I shall proceed to disagree violently, I hope, with each one of these claims. Christopher Fildes himself would have been far more effective and far less violent, but I defend The Master as best I can.

There are some US investors to whom Christopher Fildes' writing does not speak. These are those investors who did not invest, directly or through mutual funds in Enron, in Lehman Brothers, in Freddie Mac or Fannie Mae, in Merrill Lynch or any of the other banks that had to be bailed out in the financial crisis, in GM or other busted flushes of the US corporate world, and who as investors were completely untouched and untroubled by the great Financial Crisis that began in 2007 (or 2008, according to taste), and who are investors that invest in such a way that the crooked timber of human nature has no bearing on the risks and returns to their portfolios. To that set of US investors, Fildes indeed has naught to say.

Moving on to the next charge--is Fields cynical? The definition of the word "cynical" is instructive. The etymology of "cynic" means "the dog like ones", for reasons which may not detain is here. More importantly is its usage: at first the word applied to people who saw the world as it truly was or is, and only later did the pejorative connotation attach to the world. Fildes is a man who writes about the financial world as it really is. And looking at Enron, Madoff, and the way that the banks have been bailed out by the taxpayer and the rules of competition and free markets that the bankers insisted applied to everyone else have been suspended for them alone, it is possible to feel that perhaps one cannot be cynical enough about the financial world as it has worked thus far. Precisely what were all those highly paid risk managers in banks doing in 2007 and 2008? And which civil servants in the European Union have lost their jobs for accepting at trace value the giant kebab of lies that were the Greek National Accounts? In this sense Fildes was cynical, and as every taxpayer in what used to be called Christendom has learnt to their cost, there is much to be cynical about. To accuse a financial writer such as Fildes of being cynical, as the other reviewer of this book does, is like accusing Eisenhower of being a soldier, accusing Kasparov of liking chess, or the Founding Fathers of being political. It was Fildes professional duty to be cynical, and he did it very well.

The other reviewer's final charge is that Fildes if nostalgic. This is not the case. "Nostalgia" means "Regret or sorrowful longing for the conditions of a past age; regretful or wistful memory or recall of an earlier time." (OED). Nothing in Fildes' writing is nostalgic, he never regrets of longs for the past age of finance. Rather than regretting the loss of a past age, Fildes regrets that not enough has changed; if he were to regret some age, it would be that no future age has yet come in which financiers and regulators are not more honest and competent as a class. What Fildes does do, almost all the time, is compare current events with historical precedent. It is simply wrong to assert that Fildes is nostalgic. The correct thing to say is that he has a sense of history or that he is an historian of how the ordinary investor or taxpayer has gotten ripped off through the ages. Leaving aside the question of accuracy in vocabulary, we can ask the broader question of whether financial history is relevant? As Fildes himself might have pointed out, in boom times there are plenty of people who believe that "This time it is different"--young men in a hurry who berate and despise those with a longer, more patient view, the kind of view that Fildes held and set out so well. But in the long run we see that every bubble is the same (in fact they are all liquidity bubbles or credit bubbles) and there are no new frauds under the sun. And this is precisely the point of reading Fildes. He is gentle, he is subtle, he is humorous and does not fight back to defend himself against those who read him as an old fuddy-duddy: but in the long run, ninety nine times out of ninety nine, his reading of human nature in financial matters is spot on. Anyone who contemplated investing in Madoff or anyone who invested in sub-prime mortgages or shares in Lehman would have saved money had they appreciated the concept of the Bezzle, one of Fildes' great literary devices.

Fildes' touchstones of financial analysis were the same as those of JP Morgan: character, character and above all character. This approach to understanding finance requires hard thought and careful judgement, and had gone right out of style by about 2007. However, reading Fildes is a good way to get back into the swing of this particular thing, which once was the mainstay of senior bankers' work.

There is one more charge that the other reviewer makes against Fildes, which is that he is English. Against this criminal charge I cannot defend the Master of Financial Character Analysis--yes, Christopher Fildes is guilty as charged, alongside Shakespeare, Milton, Austen and Keats. And like them he has as much or as little to say about the human condition.

Buy this book. It will make you richer--spiritually, in wisdom, and financially.

"EPICTETUS"
Qusicam
The main author, an OBE, had been a columnist for The Daily Telegraph, The Times, The Daily Mail, and the founding editior of Euromoney in his four decade of journalistic career. This twelve chapter book is essentially a collection of his columns from 198x to 200x. His writing skill is good and style sarcastically exquisite. However, as what he wrote was primarily of London business and people, I really couldnt enjoy this book the same way I do with most American books that talked about big names and issues I am much more familiar with. In case you are a London financier I am quite sure you will like this book and have fun. If you are a foreigner and just wanna read for leisure, I suggest you to give this a pass.

As a content page is not available here on Amazon, I would like to take the privilege to type it to give you a better idea of what this book is about, though briefly.

Part 1: City

Chapter 1: Bulls, Bears, Booms and Busts (White knuckle rides on the world's markets - and logging the dot.coms off)

Chapter 2: Currency Cocktails (I like this the most)(How do you like your money - shaken, stirred or with a twist)

Chapter 3: The Good, theBad and the Ugly (Heros and villains of the financial world, from the Queen Mother to Robert Maxwell)

Chapter 4: The Leaning Tower of Lime Street (The scandals and travails of Lloyd;s of London)

Chapter 5: Chancellors and Governors (From Montagu Norman and Winston Churchill to Mervyn King and Gordon Brown - and even Che Guevara)

Chapter 6: The Boondoggle Circuit (The curious world of multinational talking shops and conferences)

Part 2: Suburban

Chapter 7: Dear Occupier (The perils of the housing market, and my plan to move into the Ritz)

Chapter 8: I.K. Gricer's Railway Jottings (A Platonic view of civilized travel as it is and as it might be)

Chapter 9: Captain Threadneedle Reports (My correspondence keeps an eye on the City's favoourite sport)

Chapter 10: Lunch at the Dealmakers' Arms (I say, waiter, put this restaurant on the bill)

Part 3: Hong Kong West

Chapter 11: Old City, New City (Reconstrucing an offshore financial centre on the north shore of the Thames)

Chapter 12: Goodbye to all that (A cheerful farewell to the old City life, and welcome to Hong Kong West)
Qusicam
The main author, an OBE, had been a columnist for The Daily Telegraph, The Times, The Daily Mail, and the founding editior of Euromoney in his four decade of journalistic career. This twelve chapter book is essentially a collection of his columns from 198x to 200x. His writing skill is good and style sarcastically exquisite. However, as what he wrote was primarily of London business and people, I really couldnt enjoy this book the same way I do with most American books that talked about big names and issues I am much more familiar with. In case you are a London financier I am quite sure you will like this book and have fun. If you are a foreigner and just wanna read for leisure, I suggest you to give this a pass.

As a content page is not available here on Amazon, I would like to take the privilege to type it to give you a better idea of what this book is about, though briefly.

Part 1: City

Chapter 1: Bulls, Bears, Booms and Busts (White knuckle rides on the world's markets - and logging the dot.coms off)

Chapter 2: Currency Cocktails (I like this the most)(How do you like your money - shaken, stirred or with a twist)

Chapter 3: The Good, theBad and the Ugly (Heros and villains of the financial world, from the Queen Mother to Robert Maxwell)

Chapter 4: The Leaning Tower of Lime Street (The scandals and travails of Lloyd;s of London)

Chapter 5: Chancellors and Governors (From Montagu Norman and Winston Churchill to Mervyn King and Gordon Brown - and even Che Guevara)

Chapter 6: The Boondoggle Circuit (The curious world of multinational talking shops and conferences)

Part 2: Suburban

Chapter 7: Dear Occupier (The perils of the housing market, and my plan to move into the Ritz)

Chapter 8: I.K. Gricer's Railway Jottings (A Platonic view of civilized travel as it is and as it might be)

Chapter 9: Captain Threadneedle Reports (My correspondence keeps an eye on the City's favoourite sport)

Chapter 10: Lunch at the Dealmakers' Arms (I say, waiter, put this restaurant on the bill)

Part 3: Hong Kong West

Chapter 11: Old City, New City (Reconstrucing an offshore financial centre on the north shore of the Thames)

Chapter 12: Goodbye to all that (A cheerful farewell to the old City life, and welcome to Hong Kong West)