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The Rough Guide to Mandarin Chinese Dictionary Phrasebook 3 (Rough Guides Phrase Books) epub download

by Lexus,Rough Guides


The Rough Guide to Mandarin Chinese Dictionary Phrasebook 3 (Rough Guide Phrasebooks).

The Rough Guide to Mandarin Chinese Dictionary Phrasebook 3 (Rough Guide Phrasebooks). The Rough Guide to Mandarin Chinese Dictionary Phrasebook 3 (Rough Guide Phrasebooks). Download (pdf, . 5 Mb) Donate Read.

The Rough Guide Hindi/Urdu dictionary phrasebook is a highly practical introduction The.

The Rough Guide to Hindi & Urdu Dictionary Phrasebook 3. 242 Pages·2010·8. 4 MB·6,038 Downloads. The Rough Guide Hindi/Urdu dictionary phrasebook is a highly practical introduction The. Essential Mandarin Chinese Phrasebook & Dictionary. 208 Pages·2017·8 The Rough Guide to French Dictionary Phrasebook 3 (Rough Guide Phrasebooks).

Rough Guide phrase books seem to have a short introduction to basic situations and then expanded dictionaries, that often have several dialogues included that would be useful when you look up the word. It also has the Mandarin characters next to the word or dialogue. We are spending two weeks in China and this seems fine.

The Rough Guide to Mandarin Chinese Dictionary Phrasebook 3. 292 Pages·2010·7. 05 MB·2,418 Downloads. The main part of the Rough Guide is a double dictionary: nÇ dĕi zài Shànghăi huànchē b. [nee day. 193 Pages·2016·12 Essential Mandarin Chinese Phrasebook & Dictionary.

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Near the back of the book too the Rough Guide offers an extensive Menu Reader

Laid out in clear A-Z style, it uses key-word referencing to lead you straight to the words and phrases you want – so if you need to book a room, just look up ‘room’. Near the back of the book too the Rough Guide offers an extensive Menu Reader. Consisting of food and drink sections (each starting with a list of essential terms), it’s indispensable whether you’re eating out, stopping for a quick drink, or browsing through a local food market.

Download books for free. The Rough Guide to Portuguese Dictionary Phrasebook. With this phrasebook in your backpack you will never run out of things to say – iyi yolculuklar!! Categories: Linguistics\Dictionaries. Издание: Blg Upd. Издательство: Rough Guides. ISBN 13: 9781843536475. Series: Rough Guide Phrasebooks. File: PDF, 1. 1 MB. Читать онлайн.

Free App downloads The Rough Guides Phrasebook container app . Download all Mandarin Chinese MP3s.

Download all Mandarin Chinese MP3s.

Cover title: Mandarin Chinese dictionary phrasebook. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by sf-loadersive. org on October 12, 2009.

Whether you want to reserve a hotel room, hire a bicycle or pay the restaurant bill – The Rough Guide Mandarin Chinese Phrasebook will help you all the way. The A-Z English to Mandarin and A-Z Mandarin to English translations will have you speaking the language even before you step off the plane. Practice your pronunciation with 16-pages of additional scenario material; available as downloadable audio files, the scenarios have been recorded by native Mandarin speakers and are compatible to either your computer or iPod. This thoroughly-revised third edition includes a detailed grammar section and a helpful menu and drinks list reader to ensure you always choose the right dish. With this phrasebook in your pocket you are sure to have a great trip!

The Rough Guide to Mandarin Chinese Dictionary Phrasebook 3 (Rough Guides Phrase Books) epub download

ISBN13: 978-1843536352

ISBN: 1843536358

Author: Lexus,Rough Guides

Category: Reference

Subcategory: Foreign Language Study & Reference

Language: English

Publisher: Rough Guides; Bilingual, Updated edition (May 29, 2006)

Pages: 288 pages

ePUB size: 1754 kb

FB2 size: 1206 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 950

Other Formats: mbr lit docx azw

Related to The Rough Guide to Mandarin Chinese Dictionary Phrasebook 3 (Rough Guides Phrase Books) ePub books

Shaktit
I have used two editions of this in China and compared it to several other phrasebooks. But l just got Pocket Interpreter Chinese and have to say it looks slightly better. Both books are cheap and you might as well buy both.

Any usable phrasebook has to tell you both the pronunciation of words with tones, and the Chinese characters. Some omit the tones because they are hard at first, but no one in China will understand you if you do not pronounce tones at least nearly correctly most of the time. You need Chinese characters because sometimes you are going to have to point to them in the book to help people understand. And, despite heated arguments in some circles, you need the official Chinese pinyin romanization of Mandarin. If you grew up reading of Peking you might find Beijing odd. But "Beijing" is far more suggestive of the correct pronunciation. This phrasebook fits into a shirt pocket or the back pocket of your pants ready to use. These are the only two phrasebook that have all of that.

This book has a good sampling of short phrases on things like taking a bus (under the entry for "bus") but it concentrates on single words. This is really important when you are on-the-spot. The sample conversations in other phrasebooks rarely say just what you need -- and the replies are never what you will hear. A single word can tell someone what you are talking *about*, and from there you can work out exactly what you want to say about it.

Problems: This book is out of date. It has advice on taking a train but not a plane. And you will definitely want to find automated teller machines, electronic banks. Some people will tell you there are few of these in the country -- and they are wrong. Automated teller machines are all over Beijing and Xi'an (I am writing this in Xi'an). The term is not in this book. The best excuse for omitting the term is that these machines are so common you hardly need to ask how to find one! But, really, you will need to find them and a phrasebook should tell you how to do that. If you see a problem like this in advance, then look up the words you need on line.

Overall, when I think about the things I have actually needed to look up, this book seems not quite so well organized as Pocket Interpreter Chinese.
Shaktit
I have used two editions of this in China and compared it to several other phrasebooks. But l just got Pocket Interpreter Chinese and have to say it looks slightly better. Both books are cheap and you might as well buy both.

Any usable phrasebook has to tell you both the pronunciation of words with tones, and the Chinese characters. Some omit the tones because they are hard at first, but no one in China will understand you if you do not pronounce tones at least nearly correctly most of the time. You need Chinese characters because sometimes you are going to have to point to them in the book to help people understand. And, despite heated arguments in some circles, you need the official Chinese pinyin romanization of Mandarin. If you grew up reading of Peking you might find Beijing odd. But "Beijing" is far more suggestive of the correct pronunciation. This phrasebook fits into a shirt pocket or the back pocket of your pants ready to use. These are the only two phrasebook that have all of that.

This book has a good sampling of short phrases on things like taking a bus (under the entry for "bus") but it concentrates on single words. This is really important when you are on-the-spot. The sample conversations in other phrasebooks rarely say just what you need -- and the replies are never what you will hear. A single word can tell someone what you are talking *about*, and from there you can work out exactly what you want to say about it.

Problems: This book is out of date. It has advice on taking a train but not a plane. And you will definitely want to find automated teller machines, electronic banks. Some people will tell you there are few of these in the country -- and they are wrong. Automated teller machines are all over Beijing and Xi'an (I am writing this in Xi'an). The term is not in this book. The best excuse for omitting the term is that these machines are so common you hardly need to ask how to find one! But, really, you will need to find them and a phrasebook should tell you how to do that. If you see a problem like this in advance, then look up the words you need on line.

Overall, when I think about the things I have actually needed to look up, this book seems not quite so well organized as Pocket Interpreter Chinese.
Steel_Blade
For travel to China this book is fine. I have used the Lonely Planet phrase books also and this differs in that Lonely Planet divides the phrase book into different situations. At the end there is a small dictionary. Rough Guide phrase books seem to have a short introduction to basic situations and then expanded dictionaries, that often have several dialogues included that would be useful when you look up the word. It also has the Mandarin characters next to the word or dialogue. We are spending two weeks in China and this seems fine. Trying to learn complete phrases hasn't worked too well for me. Mostly I need to look up words like beer, chicken, hot pot etc., try and pronounce them, and if they still can't understand, show the foreign words from the dictionary to the waiter...hotel people. As to whether the Rough Guide is better than Lonely Planet, I think if you are just on tour for a while either will help. As I said, I have used Lonely Planet in the past and thought I would try Rough Guide for Chinese Mandarin and also bought one for Japanese.
Steel_Blade
For travel to China this book is fine. I have used the Lonely Planet phrase books also and this differs in that Lonely Planet divides the phrase book into different situations. At the end there is a small dictionary. Rough Guide phrase books seem to have a short introduction to basic situations and then expanded dictionaries, that often have several dialogues included that would be useful when you look up the word. It also has the Mandarin characters next to the word or dialogue. We are spending two weeks in China and this seems fine. Trying to learn complete phrases hasn't worked too well for me. Mostly I need to look up words like beer, chicken, hot pot etc., try and pronounce them, and if they still can't understand, show the foreign words from the dictionary to the waiter...hotel people. As to whether the Rough Guide is better than Lonely Planet, I think if you are just on tour for a while either will help. As I said, I have used Lonely Planet in the past and thought I would try Rough Guide for Chinese Mandarin and also bought one for Japanese.
Sennnel
I found the book to be a great pocket size for taking with me without having to carry it in my hands. The book has a nice amount of words for translation, however it would be nice if it had a few more short common phrases such as: ice cream, or cut the grass, etc.
Sennnel
I found the book to be a great pocket size for taking with me without having to carry it in my hands. The book has a nice amount of words for translation, however it would be nice if it had a few more short common phrases such as: ice cream, or cut the grass, etc.
Usaxma
Received on time and as advertised.
Usaxma
Received on time and as advertised.
Nanecele
Rough Guide Mandarin is structured completely different from most phrase books: The first 40+ pages gives you numbers, days of the week, time, etc., and a 20 minute course in grammar. Oh no, you might be saying, but it is presented very simply. For instance it presents a handful of common verbs and their conjugations. So on one page you can see how to say "I have," "he has, " etc. and "I like," "he/ she likes," etc.

The rest of the book is split between an English-Mandarin dictionary (160 pages approx), a Mandarin-English dictionary (40 pages, approx.), and a 20 page menu reader. What makes the English-Mandarin dictionary pages unique, though, is that most every other page (at least) has dialogue boxes relating to the most useful word(s) on that particular page. For instance, when you thumb through the book for the word "live," you get the word itself, but also the phrases "I live in..." and "Where do you live?" It'll take you 10 minutes to find such a phrase in Berlitz or Lonely Planet in their "getting to know others' section. But because Rough Guide is structured as a dictionary, with hundreds of really useful phrases highlighted in boxes within, you can access something you want to say rather swiftly...and actually deliver it just a minute or so after looking for it. Add the grammar section, where you learn useful verbs and how to conjugate their past tenses, and the number section, and you can learn easily to chat with someone about where you are from, where you are going, where you have traveled thus far, what you like/liked, and so on. Likewise, knowing have to say "have" make sit easily to ask whether a hotel has rooms, whether the room has a shower (after thumbing through the book for the word for shower), etc. And when the answer comes back that the hotel doesn't have, or say "we have," you can actually catch what they are saying.

If still not persuaded, next time you're in a bookstore compare a Berlitz, a Lonely Planet, and a Rough Guide language phrase book side by side. Lonely Planet Mandarin, for example, is basically several pages of basic grammar followed by many sections of phases you won't likely ever use. For instance, the guide provides several pages each of lists of occupations, nationalities, college majors, items of stationary, jewelery, colors, insects, flowers, aquatic sports(!), electrical appliances, camping terms,and so on. Also provided are pat phrases to employ at a hotel's front desk, at a doctor's, at the optometrist, and eating out, among other mini-sections. The book, in effect, is set up to be taken out to be used once a day, if that. It's an improvement on Berlitz phrase books, but not by much. (Berlitz simply divides their books into 10 or so color coded sections such as: "sightseeing," "relaxing," "shopping," traveling around," "money," "eating out," etc.)

So, if you just want a book for emergencies (say, breaking a leg, etc.) then Berlitz and/or Lonely Planet phrase books will serve you well...in your pocket until you are faced with such a situation, since they do have many more specific terms (like 50 different parts of the the body), but if you really want to be able to say some things in Chinese on a daily basis during your trip you'll be much better served by Rough Guide Mandarin. Cheers
Nanecele
Rough Guide Mandarin is structured completely different from most phrase books: The first 40+ pages gives you numbers, days of the week, time, etc., and a 20 minute course in grammar. Oh no, you might be saying, but it is presented very simply. For instance it presents a handful of common verbs and their conjugations. So on one page you can see how to say "I have," "he has, " etc. and "I like," "he/ she likes," etc.

The rest of the book is split between an English-Mandarin dictionary (160 pages approx), a Mandarin-English dictionary (40 pages, approx.), and a 20 page menu reader. What makes the English-Mandarin dictionary pages unique, though, is that most every other page (at least) has dialogue boxes relating to the most useful word(s) on that particular page. For instance, when you thumb through the book for the word "live," you get the word itself, but also the phrases "I live in..." and "Where do you live?" It'll take you 10 minutes to find such a phrase in Berlitz or Lonely Planet in their "getting to know others' section. But because Rough Guide is structured as a dictionary, with hundreds of really useful phrases highlighted in boxes within, you can access something you want to say rather swiftly...and actually deliver it just a minute or so after looking for it. Add the grammar section, where you learn useful verbs and how to conjugate their past tenses, and the number section, and you can learn easily to chat with someone about where you are from, where you are going, where you have traveled thus far, what you like/liked, and so on. Likewise, knowing have to say "have" make sit easily to ask whether a hotel has rooms, whether the room has a shower (after thumbing through the book for the word for shower), etc. And when the answer comes back that the hotel doesn't have, or say "we have," you can actually catch what they are saying.

If still not persuaded, next time you're in a bookstore compare a Berlitz, a Lonely Planet, and a Rough Guide language phrase book side by side. Lonely Planet Mandarin, for example, is basically several pages of basic grammar followed by many sections of phases you won't likely ever use. For instance, the guide provides several pages each of lists of occupations, nationalities, college majors, items of stationary, jewelery, colors, insects, flowers, aquatic sports(!), electrical appliances, camping terms,and so on. Also provided are pat phrases to employ at a hotel's front desk, at a doctor's, at the optometrist, and eating out, among other mini-sections. The book, in effect, is set up to be taken out to be used once a day, if that. It's an improvement on Berlitz phrase books, but not by much. (Berlitz simply divides their books into 10 or so color coded sections such as: "sightseeing," "relaxing," "shopping," traveling around," "money," "eating out," etc.)

So, if you just want a book for emergencies (say, breaking a leg, etc.) then Berlitz and/or Lonely Planet phrase books will serve you well...in your pocket until you are faced with such a situation, since they do have many more specific terms (like 50 different parts of the the body), but if you really want to be able to say some things in Chinese on a daily basis during your trip you'll be much better served by Rough Guide Mandarin. Cheers