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The Rough Guide to Thai Dictionary Phrasebook 3 (Rough Guides Phrase Books) epub download

by Lexus,Rough Guides


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Whether you want to reserve a hotel room, sample the local beer or simply find out what time the bank opens – The Rough Guide German Phrasebook will help you all the way.

Download books for free. The Rough Guide to Portuguese Dictionary Phrasebook. With this phrasebook in your backpack you will never run out of things to say – iyi yolculuklar!! Categories: Linguistics\Dictionaries. Pages: 268. ISBN 10: 1843536471. ISBN 13: 9781843536475. Series: Rough Guide Phrasebooks.

Take along the Rough Guide Thai Phrasebook and make some new foreign friends while on your trip.

The Rough Guide Phrasebook Thai" is the definitive phrasebook to help you make the most of your time in. .

The Rough Guide Phrasebook Thai" is the definitive phrasebook to help you make the most of your time in Thailand. The Rough Guide Phrasebook Thai" has an extensive two-way dictionary packed with vocabulary and a helpful menu and drinks list reader, perfect for choosing the right dish in any restaurant OZON. ru 536. Похожие книги

The Rough Guide Thai Phrasebook has an extensive two-way dictionary packed with vocabulary and a helpful menu and drinks list reader, perfect for choosing the right dish in any restaurant.

The Rough Guide Thai Phrasebook has an extensive two-way dictionary packed with vocabulary and a helpful menu and drinks list reader, perfect for choosing the right dish in any restaurant. Wit this phrasebook you will never run out of things to say!Make the most of your trip to Thailand with the Rough Guide Thai Phrasebook.

Near the back of the book too the Rough Guide offers an extensive Menu Reader

Laid out in clear A-Z style, it uses key-word referencing to lead you straight to the words and phrases you want – so if you need to book a room, just look up ‘room’. Near the back of the book too the Rough Guide offers an extensive Menu Reader. Consisting of food and drink sections (each starting with a list of essential terms), it’s indispensable whether you’re eating out, stopping for a quick drink, or browsing through a local food market.

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Take along the Rough Guide Thai Phrasebook and make some new foreign friends while on your trip. This thoroughly revised third edition has both A-Z English- Thai and A-Z Thai translations – perfect for quick word reference. Practice your pronunciation with the 16-pages of additional scenario material; available as downloadable audio files, the scenarios have been recorded by native Thai speakers and are compatible to either your computer or iPod. The guide includes a detailed grammar section and a helpful menu and drinks list reader – ideal when sampling the local cuisine. With this pocket-sized phrasebook in your backpack you are sure to have a good trip – têe-o hâi sa-nòok ná!

The Rough Guide to Thai Dictionary Phrasebook 3 (Rough Guides Phrase Books) epub download

ISBN13: 978-1843536222

ISBN: 1843536226

Author: Lexus,Rough Guides

Category: Reference

Subcategory: Foreign Language Study & Reference

Language: English

Publisher: Rough Guides; Bilingual, Updated edition (May 29, 2006)

Pages: 288 pages

ePUB size: 1210 kb

FB2 size: 1691 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 963

Other Formats: lrf lrf mbr azw

Related to The Rough Guide to Thai Dictionary Phrasebook 3 (Rough Guides Phrase Books) ePub books

Gna
Received on time and as advertised.
Gna
Received on time and as advertised.
Abywis
Rough Guides are structured completely different from most phrase books: The first several dozen pages give you numbers, days of the week, time, etc., and a 20 minute course in grammar. Oh no, you might be saying, but it is presented very simply. For instance it presents a handful of common verbs and their conjugations. So on one page you can see how to say "I have," "he has, " etc. and "I like," "he/ she likes," etc.

The rest of the book is split between, in this case, an English-Thai dictionary, a Thai-English dictionary, and a 20 page menu reader. What makes the English-Thai dictionary pages unique, though, is that most every other page (at least) has dialogue boxes relating to the most useful word(s) on that particular page. For instance, when you thumb through the book for the word "live," you get the word itself, but also the phrases "I live in..." and "Where do you live?" It'll take you 10 minutes to find such a phrase in Berlitz or Lonely Planet in their "getting to know others' section. But because Rough Guide is structured as a dictionary, with hundreds of really useful phrases highlighted in boxes within, you can access something you want to say rather swiftly...and actually deliver it just a minute or so after looking for it. Add the grammar section, where you learn useful verbs and how to conjugate their past tenses, and the number section, and you can learn easily to chat with someone about where you are from, where you are going, where you have traveled thus far, what you like/liked, and so on. Likewise, knowing have to say "have" make sit easily to ask whether a hotel has rooms, whether the room has a shower (after thumbing through the book for the word for shower), etc. And when the answer comes back that the hotel doesn't have, or say "we have," you can actually catch what they are saying.

If still not persuaded, next time you're in a bookstore compare a Berlitz, a Lonely Planet, and a Rough Guide language phrase book side by side. Lonely Planet Thai, for example, is basically several pages of basic grammar followed by many sections of phases you won't likely ever use. For instance, the guide provides several pages each of lists of occupations, nationalities, items of stationary, colors, insects, flowers and so on. Also provided are pat phrases to employ at a hotel's front desk, at a doctor's, at the optometrist, and eating out, among other mini-sections. The book, in effect, is set up to be taken out to be used once a day, if that. It's an improvement on Berlitz phrase books, but not by much. (Berlitz simply divides their books into 10 or so color coded sections such as: "sightseeing," "relaxing," "shopping," travelling around," "money," "eating out," etc.)

So, if you just want a book for emergencies (say, breaking a leg, etc.) then Berlitz and/or Lonely Planet phrase books will serve you well...in your pocket until you are faced with such a situation, since they do have many more specific terms (like 50 different parts of the the body),
but if you really want to be able to say some things in Thai on a daily basis during your trip you'll be much better served by Rough Guide Thai. Cheers
Abywis
Rough Guides are structured completely different from most phrase books: The first several dozen pages give you numbers, days of the week, time, etc., and a 20 minute course in grammar. Oh no, you might be saying, but it is presented very simply. For instance it presents a handful of common verbs and their conjugations. So on one page you can see how to say "I have," "he has, " etc. and "I like," "he/ she likes," etc.

The rest of the book is split between, in this case, an English-Thai dictionary, a Thai-English dictionary, and a 20 page menu reader. What makes the English-Thai dictionary pages unique, though, is that most every other page (at least) has dialogue boxes relating to the most useful word(s) on that particular page. For instance, when you thumb through the book for the word "live," you get the word itself, but also the phrases "I live in..." and "Where do you live?" It'll take you 10 minutes to find such a phrase in Berlitz or Lonely Planet in their "getting to know others' section. But because Rough Guide is structured as a dictionary, with hundreds of really useful phrases highlighted in boxes within, you can access something you want to say rather swiftly...and actually deliver it just a minute or so after looking for it. Add the grammar section, where you learn useful verbs and how to conjugate their past tenses, and the number section, and you can learn easily to chat with someone about where you are from, where you are going, where you have traveled thus far, what you like/liked, and so on. Likewise, knowing have to say "have" make sit easily to ask whether a hotel has rooms, whether the room has a shower (after thumbing through the book for the word for shower), etc. And when the answer comes back that the hotel doesn't have, or say "we have," you can actually catch what they are saying.

If still not persuaded, next time you're in a bookstore compare a Berlitz, a Lonely Planet, and a Rough Guide language phrase book side by side. Lonely Planet Thai, for example, is basically several pages of basic grammar followed by many sections of phases you won't likely ever use. For instance, the guide provides several pages each of lists of occupations, nationalities, items of stationary, colors, insects, flowers and so on. Also provided are pat phrases to employ at a hotel's front desk, at a doctor's, at the optometrist, and eating out, among other mini-sections. The book, in effect, is set up to be taken out to be used once a day, if that. It's an improvement on Berlitz phrase books, but not by much. (Berlitz simply divides their books into 10 or so color coded sections such as: "sightseeing," "relaxing," "shopping," travelling around," "money," "eating out," etc.)

So, if you just want a book for emergencies (say, breaking a leg, etc.) then Berlitz and/or Lonely Planet phrase books will serve you well...in your pocket until you are faced with such a situation, since they do have many more specific terms (like 50 different parts of the the body),
but if you really want to be able to say some things in Thai on a daily basis during your trip you'll be much better served by Rough Guide Thai. Cheers
HelloBoB:D
This is a great quick reference with a lot of relevent phrases near similar words and ideas.
My only real criticism is that I'm American and the fact that it's written by British folks means that, when looking up words or phrases, you have to think about the way a Brit might phrase it and look it up that way if you cannot find it the first time around (eg, I'd never heard a "diaper" referred to as a "nappy."). Similarly, because British folks pronounce things differently, the way they've romanized the words is a little funky. For example, the word for "today" is pronounced "wan-nee" but is written "wun-nee" in the book (and the same thing for "chan" and "chun"). So it's something to be conscious of when using this as a reference -- everytime you see a "u" you have to decide whether or not it's an "ah" or "uh" sound.
So other than that, it's pretty awesome.
HelloBoB:D
This is a great quick reference with a lot of relevent phrases near similar words and ideas.
My only real criticism is that I'm American and the fact that it's written by British folks means that, when looking up words or phrases, you have to think about the way a Brit might phrase it and look it up that way if you cannot find it the first time around (eg, I'd never heard a "diaper" referred to as a "nappy."). Similarly, because British folks pronounce things differently, the way they've romanized the words is a little funky. For example, the word for "today" is pronounced "wan-nee" but is written "wun-nee" in the book (and the same thing for "chan" and "chun"). So it's something to be conscious of when using this as a reference -- everytime you see a "u" you have to decide whether or not it's an "ah" or "uh" sound.
So other than that, it's pretty awesome.