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Everything In Its Place: My Trials And Triumphs With Obsessive Compulsive Disorder epub download

by Eric Hollander,Marc Summers


Marc Summer's "Everything In Its Place" is a good read and offers insight into the thought processes of a person suffering from cleanliness compulsions.

Marc Summer's "Everything In Its Place" is a good read and offers insight into the thought processes of a person suffering from cleanliness compulsions. If for no other reason, this book was helpful. Less convincing is his analysis of why people suffer from OCD.

Marc Summer's "Everything In Its Place" is a good read and offers insight into the thought processes of a. .

From the time he was in first grade, Mare Summers made sure everything in his world was perfect. His clothes hung exactly a quarter-inch apart in his closet-no more, no less. If he smudged his homework, even slightly, he would redo the assignment on a fresh sheet of paper. This was more than a desire to get things right. Summers believed that failure to perform these tasks meant something terrible would befall his parents or himself. Summers was also madly in love with television, equally as determined to be a television personality as he was to keep his room spotless.

Everything in Its Place book.

By marc summers with eric hollander, . I was booked, bounced, and rebooked nine times. Late-night talk show talent coordinators have a difficult job. Agents and publicists call them constantly, trying to get their clients an appearance. I didn't know the root cause, but I did know that being bounced time and again off The Tonight Show was making me nuts.

Redirected from Everything in Its Place). Marc Summers (born Marc Berkowitz; November 11, 1951) is an American television personality, comedian, game show host, producer, and talk show host. He is best known for hosting Double Dare for Nickelodeon, Unwrapped for Food Network, and recently he was Executive Producer for both Dinner: Impossible and Restaurant: Impossible also for Food Network.

Ships from the UK. Former Library books. Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Read full description

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Summers believes his considerable career success is tied to his OCD, since it was "a way for me to channel an aspect of my disease: my need to win, to be perfect, to be the best.

This is a great book. Marc Summers is one of the best gameshow hosts in the history of television

This is a great book. Marc Summers is one of the best gameshow hosts in the history of television. It is nice that he hasn't been "type-casted" and that he is and was able to do various hosting duties. The book does talk about his OCD and his career. I hope he returns to televsion, hopefully hosting Double Dare 2000.

The WHO classifies OCD as one of the top ten most disabling illnesses. According to Marc Summers’ book Everything In Its Place, doctors are better at treating cases of OCD, then they are with understanding it. 3 pages, 1098 words.

Everything In Its Place: My Trials And Triumphs With Obsessive Compulsive Disorder epub download

ISBN13: 978-0756777432

ISBN: 0756777437

Author: Eric Hollander,Marc Summers

Category: Other

Subcategory: Social Sciences

Language: English

Publisher: Diane Pub Co (April 1, 1999)

Pages: 217 pages

ePUB size: 1851 kb

FB2 size: 1944 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 237

Other Formats: mobi rtf mobi mbr

Related to Everything In Its Place: My Trials And Triumphs With Obsessive Compulsive Disorder ePub books

Zololmaran
This book reads more like a medical journal then a story. If you suffer from OCD then this book could be helpfu, or interestingl to you. If you want to read a story about someone with OCD then you will be very disappointed.
Zololmaran
This book reads more like a medical journal then a story. If you suffer from OCD then this book could be helpfu, or interestingl to you. If you want to read a story about someone with OCD then you will be very disappointed.
Terr
Firstly, I do not suffer from OCD myself. I purchased the book after yaers of hearing how good it was. Needless to say, I wasn't disappointed. The book serves as both a fascinating autobiography and a wonderful learning tool for insight into this particular affliction, helping those without it understand those who suffer from it. Entertaining, insightful, and informative! I hope since it's publication that Mr. Summers has gone on to an even better life, both personally and career wise. I'd recommend this book to anyone and everyone.
Terr
Firstly, I do not suffer from OCD myself. I purchased the book after yaers of hearing how good it was. Needless to say, I wasn't disappointed. The book serves as both a fascinating autobiography and a wonderful learning tool for insight into this particular affliction, helping those without it understand those who suffer from it. Entertaining, insightful, and informative! I hope since it's publication that Mr. Summers has gone on to an even better life, both personally and career wise. I'd recommend this book to anyone and everyone.
White gold
It was more of a self-help and awareness book than a biography. I was hoping it would be more of a biography than it was.
White gold
It was more of a self-help and awareness book than a biography. I was hoping it would be more of a biography than it was.
Cordaron
I thoroughly enjoyed your book. It is something any shrink would be wise in having their patients read even if they have a disorder other than OCD.
Cordaron
I thoroughly enjoyed your book. It is something any shrink would be wise in having their patients read even if they have a disorder other than OCD.
Thordira
Marc Summer's "Everything In Its Place" is a good read and offers insight into the thought processes of a person suffering from cleanliness compulsions. As someone who has battled eating and exercise disorders and other compulsions for many years, I found his account fascinating and believable. If for no other reason, this book was helpful.

Less convincing is his analysis of why people suffer from OCD. Although there may be a genetic component, this has not been established. The intergenerational correlation, while there is some, is not strong. Moreover, even if one could establish a strong intergenerational correlation in the case of OCD, it would not prove a genetic correlation, since such a correlation is consistent with a home environment where one person with OCD influences another person in that direction. Moreover, Marc seems to think that the only way to overcome OCD is through the use of drugs to control the symptoms. Undoubtedly drugs have provided relief for many OCD sufferers. However, drugs treat the symptoms and not the root cause. Seeing that it is generally accepted that OCD is due in large measure to the failure of the brain to complete a circuit and thus shut off the "fear" message, researchers such as Jeffrey Schwartz ("The Mind and the Brain") have suggested ways of reprogramming the brain that do not involve drugs.

Despite its less compelling explanation for why people suffer from OCD, this book is useful as a case study of the disorder and may serve to give greater insight to those who live with a family member suffering from OCD or who themselves suffer from the disorder.
Thordira
Marc Summer's "Everything In Its Place" is a good read and offers insight into the thought processes of a person suffering from cleanliness compulsions. As someone who has battled eating and exercise disorders and other compulsions for many years, I found his account fascinating and believable. If for no other reason, this book was helpful.

Less convincing is his analysis of why people suffer from OCD. Although there may be a genetic component, this has not been established. The intergenerational correlation, while there is some, is not strong. Moreover, even if one could establish a strong intergenerational correlation in the case of OCD, it would not prove a genetic correlation, since such a correlation is consistent with a home environment where one person with OCD influences another person in that direction. Moreover, Marc seems to think that the only way to overcome OCD is through the use of drugs to control the symptoms. Undoubtedly drugs have provided relief for many OCD sufferers. However, drugs treat the symptoms and not the root cause. Seeing that it is generally accepted that OCD is due in large measure to the failure of the brain to complete a circuit and thus shut off the "fear" message, researchers such as Jeffrey Schwartz ("The Mind and the Brain") have suggested ways of reprogramming the brain that do not involve drugs.

Despite its less compelling explanation for why people suffer from OCD, this book is useful as a case study of the disorder and may serve to give greater insight to those who live with a family member suffering from OCD or who themselves suffer from the disorder.
Arabella V.
I've been reading through all books I can find about OCD, as I have recently been diagnosed with this disorder. I thought this one would be lightweight, full of stories about Double Dare and written in a comic style. Was I wrong! Summers is so honest about his life and his OCD. He included information about the disorder that I have never read elsewhere, even in books that are written to be overall medical guides. I also very much enjoyed how honest he was writing about other aspects of his life, including show biz and his family life. He sounds like a fine person that I would love to get to talk to someday. It was especially interesting for me to read how long it took him to seek treatment, even after he realized what he had, as I have been through that myself. I want to thank him for writing this book and for having so much courage in sharing his story. It was his appearance on Oprah that first made me sure I did have OCD, although like him, I did nothing about it for quite a while. I had forgotten (or blocked out) that I ever saw him on the show until I read this book! A real must read for anyone interested in OCD.
Arabella V.
I've been reading through all books I can find about OCD, as I have recently been diagnosed with this disorder. I thought this one would be lightweight, full of stories about Double Dare and written in a comic style. Was I wrong! Summers is so honest about his life and his OCD. He included information about the disorder that I have never read elsewhere, even in books that are written to be overall medical guides. I also very much enjoyed how honest he was writing about other aspects of his life, including show biz and his family life. He sounds like a fine person that I would love to get to talk to someday. It was especially interesting for me to read how long it took him to seek treatment, even after he realized what he had, as I have been through that myself. I want to thank him for writing this book and for having so much courage in sharing his story. It was his appearance on Oprah that first made me sure I did have OCD, although like him, I did nothing about it for quite a while. I had forgotten (or blocked out) that I ever saw him on the show until I read this book! A real must read for anyone interested in OCD.
Mbon
The book discusses his childhood in Indiana, summers visiting with his grandmother, his brother Mike and sister Lois. His wife Alice, son Matthew and daughter Meredith have all had to endure his OCD symptoms, but up until that moment they never knew what caused him to behave and act certain ways. It actually took a year from the date of the television show for Marc to contact Eric Hollander, M.D. again and seek help such as behavior therapy and medication.
The chapters are not all in chronological order. In one chapter he discussed waiting for Alice at the church and how his OCD symptoms flared up. He reflects back at this, since at the time he was unaware of OCD and that this was the reason for his behaviors. Alice was late in arriving at the church along with her family, causing Marc to panic and yell at her once she did show up. This was the first time Alice had seen him in this state of mind. The next chapter he explains how they meet, so it was a bit confusing for me at first reading of their wedding and then going back.
He brings along flip-flops for using in bathrooms at Hotels. He cannot have his bare feet touch any floor but his own at home. He laughingly described how he cleans in the shower with the flip-flops on and removes one while balancing on the other. He has rituals in how he gets dressed, such as he lays clean socks on sheets but never on the bedspread.
As a child Marc rushed home to watch Art Linkletter. Instead of wanting to be a kid on the show Marc dreamed of one day hosting a similar show. His brother at the time played the drums and toured with famous acts, causing jealousy in Marc and sibling rivalry. College dorm life was not pleasant for Marc. He ended up persuading them to give him a single room so he could have it clean at all times.
One disturbing symptom or character flaw that Marc has exhibited is the need to win no matter who he is playing against. He discussed playing basketball with his son and also playing monopoly with both his children. I wondered why his wife never initiated a strategy for his need to win, and why they allowed him to beat his kids and not teach them differently. There are some lessons here that I have picked up on how he was raised and then what his family avoided and never discussed.
The therapy methods the Dr used seemed a bit off in my opinion and unnecessary. They started with Marc waiting five minutes and worked up to an hour I believe that he would wait after the maid left to fix the house. In my opinion I feel the Doctor should have encouraged Marc to discuss this with the maid and try to avoid this anxiety and stress by explaining how the house should be cleaned. I imagine with the book out for a number of years now that the maid must know about this, unless she does not speak English.
I would have liked seeing a list of OCD symptoms from the Foundation and/or the criteria to have a diagnosis of OCD from the DSM-IV. I feel this would be beneficial to readers who may see themselves and/or family members in the traits that Marc describes.
The book is a good read, although it does lack the correlation between OCD and Tourette's syndrome and other disabilities.
Mbon
The book discusses his childhood in Indiana, summers visiting with his grandmother, his brother Mike and sister Lois. His wife Alice, son Matthew and daughter Meredith have all had to endure his OCD symptoms, but up until that moment they never knew what caused him to behave and act certain ways. It actually took a year from the date of the television show for Marc to contact Eric Hollander, M.D. again and seek help such as behavior therapy and medication.
The chapters are not all in chronological order. In one chapter he discussed waiting for Alice at the church and how his OCD symptoms flared up. He reflects back at this, since at the time he was unaware of OCD and that this was the reason for his behaviors. Alice was late in arriving at the church along with her family, causing Marc to panic and yell at her once she did show up. This was the first time Alice had seen him in this state of mind. The next chapter he explains how they meet, so it was a bit confusing for me at first reading of their wedding and then going back.
He brings along flip-flops for using in bathrooms at Hotels. He cannot have his bare feet touch any floor but his own at home. He laughingly described how he cleans in the shower with the flip-flops on and removes one while balancing on the other. He has rituals in how he gets dressed, such as he lays clean socks on sheets but never on the bedspread.
As a child Marc rushed home to watch Art Linkletter. Instead of wanting to be a kid on the show Marc dreamed of one day hosting a similar show. His brother at the time played the drums and toured with famous acts, causing jealousy in Marc and sibling rivalry. College dorm life was not pleasant for Marc. He ended up persuading them to give him a single room so he could have it clean at all times.
One disturbing symptom or character flaw that Marc has exhibited is the need to win no matter who he is playing against. He discussed playing basketball with his son and also playing monopoly with both his children. I wondered why his wife never initiated a strategy for his need to win, and why they allowed him to beat his kids and not teach them differently. There are some lessons here that I have picked up on how he was raised and then what his family avoided and never discussed.
The therapy methods the Dr used seemed a bit off in my opinion and unnecessary. They started with Marc waiting five minutes and worked up to an hour I believe that he would wait after the maid left to fix the house. In my opinion I feel the Doctor should have encouraged Marc to discuss this with the maid and try to avoid this anxiety and stress by explaining how the house should be cleaned. I imagine with the book out for a number of years now that the maid must know about this, unless she does not speak English.
I would have liked seeing a list of OCD symptoms from the Foundation and/or the criteria to have a diagnosis of OCD from the DSM-IV. I feel this would be beneficial to readers who may see themselves and/or family members in the traits that Marc describes.
The book is a good read, although it does lack the correlation between OCD and Tourette's syndrome and other disabilities.