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Seeing Red: A Study in Consciousness (Mind/brain/behavior Initiative) epub download

by Nicholas Humphrey


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Seeing Red: A Study in C. Humphrey's latest book, a sequel to his 1992 book, A History of the Mind, is based on a series of lectures he gave at Harvard in 2004 to the Mind/Brain/Behavior Initiative Distinguished Lecture Series, and is written in a style intended to re-create as nearly as possible the informal give-and-take of those lectures, in which the audience.

Start by marking Seeing Red: A Study in Consciousness ( Initiative) . Nicholas Humphrey begins this compelling exploration of the biggest of big questions with a challenge to the reader, and himself. What's involved in "seeing red"?

Start by marking Seeing Red: A Study in Consciousness ( Initiative) (Mind/Brain/Behavior Initiative) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. What's involved in "seeing red"? What is it like for us to see someone else seeing something r.

Seeing Red: A Study in Consciousness (Mind Brain Behavior Initiative). Download (pdf, . 8 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

His ten books include Consciousness Regained, The Inner Eye, A History of the . Seeing Red: A Study in Consciousness, Belknap Press/Harvard University Press, 2006.

His ten books include Consciousness Regained, The Inner Eye, A History of the Mind, Leaps of Faith, The Mind Made Flesh, Seeing Red, and Soul Dust. He has been the recipient of several honours, including the Martin Luther King Memorial Prize, the Pufendorf Medal and the British Psychological Society's book award. He returned to Cambridge, to the Sub Department of Animal Behaviour in 1970, and there met Dian Fossey, who invited him to spend three months at her gorilla study camp in Rwanda.

Seeing a red screen tells us a fact about something in the world. It leads us to believe in mind-body duality and the existence of a soul. But it also creates a new fact – a sensation in each of our minds, the feeling of redness. And that’s the mystery. And such beliefs – even if mistaken – can be highly adaptive, because they increase the value we place on our own and others’ lives. Consciousness matters," Humphrey concludes with striking paradox, "because it is its function to matter.

In the book Nicholas Humphrey describes ''re-entrant sensation circuits'' in.

book by Nicholas Humphrey. Consciousness matters. Arguably it matters more than anything. In the book Nicholas Humphrey describes ''re-entrant sensation circuits'' in the brain, neural activity that loops back on itself, so as to create self-resonance. Sensory response circuits that have evolved to give a new level of mind sophistication. The creation of a thickening time of core consciousness. According to Humphrey: With these circuits, the subject is lifted out of zombiedom.

Mind/brain/behavior initiative. Seeing Red. A Study in Consciousness. What’s involved in seeing red ? What is it like for us to see someone else seeing something red? Seeing a red screen tells us a fact about something in the world. But it also creates a new fact-a sensation in each of our minds, the feeling of redness.

This listing is for Mind/Brain/Behavior Initiative: Seeing Red : A.

This listing is for Mind/Brain/Behavior Initiative: Seeing Red : A Study in Consciousness 5 by Nicholas Humphrey (2009, Paperback) : Nicholas Humphrey. For US customer standard shipping is Media mail typically which takes 5-9 business days for customers living in the continental US. Customers that upgrade to priority mail can expect delivery within 2-4 business days.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. Seeing Red: A Study in Consciousness (Mind Brain Behavior Initiative). Category: Образование. 8 Mb. Consciousness Regained: Chapters in the Development of Mind (Oxford Paperback Reference). 2 Mb. How to Solve the Mind-Body Problem.

Seeing red : a study in consciousness, Nicholas Humphrey. p. c. (Mind/brain/behavior initiative) Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 978-0-674-02179-2 (cloth : alk. paper) ISBN 978-0-674-03054-1 (pb. 1. Consciousness. H779 2006 126-dc22 2005052656. Unauthenticated Download Date 11/15/19 11:01 AM.

"Consciousness matters. Arguably it matters more than anything. The purpose of this book is to build towards an explanation of just what the matter is."

Nicholas Humphrey begins this compelling exploration of the biggest of big questions with a challenge to the reader, and himself. What's involved in "seeing red"? What is it like for us to see someone else seeing something red?

Seeing a red screen tells us a fact about something in the world. But it also creates a new fact--a sensation in each of our minds, the feeling of redness. And that's the mystery. Conventional science so far hasn't told us what conscious sensations are made of, or how we get access to them, or why we have them at all. From an evolutionary perspective, what's the point of consciousness?

Humphrey offers a daring and novel solution, arguing that sensations are not things that happen to us, they are things we do--originating in our primordial ancestors' expressions of liking or disgust. Tracing the evolutionary trajectory through to human beings, he shows how this has led to sensations playing the key role in the human sense of Self.

The Self, as we now know it from within, seems to have fascinating other-worldly properties. It leads us to believe in mind-body duality and the existence of a soul. And such beliefs--even if mistaken--can be highly adaptive, because they increase the value we place on our own and others' lives.

"Consciousness matters," Humphrey concludes with striking paradox, "because it is its function to matter. It has been designed to create in human beings a Self whose life is worth pursuing."

Seeing Red: A Study in Consciousness (Mind/brain/behavior Initiative) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0674021792

ISBN: 0674021797

Author: Nicholas Humphrey

Category: Other

Subcategory: Social Sciences

Language: English

Publisher: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press (March 31, 2006)

Pages: 160 pages

ePUB size: 1132 kb

FB2 size: 1731 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 369

Other Formats: lrf doc mobi lrf

Related to Seeing Red: A Study in Consciousness (Mind/brain/behavior Initiative) ePub books

SING
Where do sensation and perception diverge? Is perception based on sensation, or the other way around? Or are they both independently based on some primitive facility that lurks deep within the brain? How could consciousness possibly evolve separate to perception? What's the function of consciousness? What's its evolutionary role?

This is an amazing topic, and I find this book does a good job of surveying basic issues as well as laying out the author's particular position, though it seems that his argument sometimes fails to flow.

Ultimately, I like Humphrey's view of consciousness, with one little qualification: to describe human consciousness as a re-entrant circuit is reasonable, but that description does not explain the capacity of matter to observe in the first place. This little nitpick is what makes me a philosophical idealist rather than a philosophical materialist, but hey: it's not my book.

The book, even for its small size, has its excesses. His decision to start the book by deconstructing a statement about the state of our understanding of consciousness was a waste of ink and time. Better, I think, just to hit the ground running.

I appreciate the fact that he cites some of the criticisms of his position. Understanding counter arguments is more useful than being convinced of a particular point of view.

A nicely-produced little book. Good bathroom meditation book. If it'd only been proofread (I ran into a couple glaring typos).
SING
Where do sensation and perception diverge? Is perception based on sensation, or the other way around? Or are they both independently based on some primitive facility that lurks deep within the brain? How could consciousness possibly evolve separate to perception? What's the function of consciousness? What's its evolutionary role?

This is an amazing topic, and I find this book does a good job of surveying basic issues as well as laying out the author's particular position, though it seems that his argument sometimes fails to flow.

Ultimately, I like Humphrey's view of consciousness, with one little qualification: to describe human consciousness as a re-entrant circuit is reasonable, but that description does not explain the capacity of matter to observe in the first place. This little nitpick is what makes me a philosophical idealist rather than a philosophical materialist, but hey: it's not my book.

The book, even for its small size, has its excesses. His decision to start the book by deconstructing a statement about the state of our understanding of consciousness was a waste of ink and time. Better, I think, just to hit the ground running.

I appreciate the fact that he cites some of the criticisms of his position. Understanding counter arguments is more useful than being convinced of a particular point of view.

A nicely-produced little book. Good bathroom meditation book. If it'd only been proofread (I ran into a couple glaring typos).
Anarus
Humphrey thoroughly examines his view of personal consciousness from a neurological point of view.
Quite technical in many respects, drawing upon his experience and experiments over many years. But quite readable, building up a good case for his view.
Anarus
Humphrey thoroughly examines his view of personal consciousness from a neurological point of view.
Quite technical in many respects, drawing upon his experience and experiments over many years. But quite readable, building up a good case for his view.
Yggdi
A fair amount of redundancy. Some of the concepts are interesting, but the booklet is underwhelming.
Yggdi
A fair amount of redundancy. Some of the concepts are interesting, but the booklet is underwhelming.
Kulwes
The author starts his book with a pessimistic quotation from psychologist Stuart Sutherland, "Nothing worth reading has been written about it" (consciousness). At the end of chapter 3, the author makes a rather optimistic conclusion that "So, I do believe we are closing in on what consciousness is and what it's for, I admit...... But we are on our way" (to understand consciousness.) After reading this book in its entirety, the reader is unable to share this author's optimism.

The author attempts to relate sensation to subjective qualia, and consciousness. What is creating the sensation and what makes this to be the subject of it? Could it be consciousness or selfhood? Francis Crick and Christof Koch believe the most difficult problem is the qualia; the redness of red, painfulness of pain, etc. The author believes that neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) may be the causal factor because the experience of sensation is a result of neuronal activity. The other factor could be the functional correlates of sensation (FCC).

Wherever there is a subjective experience, there has to be a subject. Because pain, mood, wish can not exist without a bearer, and the person has to be there first before the subjective experience. Sensation consists of; ownership that belongs to the subject, body location (particular part of the body), present-ness (being at present), qualitative modality (visual, facial, hearing, etc.) and phenomenal immediacy (happening to me instead of somebody else, happening at the moment than another moment). The author surmises that the evolution of sensation, feeling, and perception starting with primitive amoeba and ending up with human beings is as follows: It appears that during evolution the sensory activity gets privatized. The command signals for every sensory response get short circuited before they reach the body surface. So that instead of reaching all the way out to peripheral site of stimulation (as in amoeba), they now reach only to points more and more central on the incoming sensory pathways, until eventually the whole processes becomes closed off from the outside world in an internal loop within the brain (as in humans.)

The book is very brief and it is based on guest lectures delivered at Harvard in spring 2004. Some paragraphs have been repeated verbatim; for example, third paragraphs of pages 94 and 121 are almost the same. It would have been easier for the reader, if the last paragraph of each chapter or the last chapter of the book had summarized the author's point.

1. Consciousness: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions)
2. The Brain: A Very Short Introduction
3. The Quest for Consciousness: A Neurobiological Approach
4. Integral Consciousness and the Future of Evolution
5. Cognition, Brain, and Consciousness: Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience
6. Matter and Consciousness: A Contemporary Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind
7. A Brief Tour of Human Consciousness: From Impostor Poodles to Purple Numbers
8. Consciousness: An Introduction
9. A Universe Of Consciousness How Matter Becomes Imagination
Kulwes
The author starts his book with a pessimistic quotation from psychologist Stuart Sutherland, "Nothing worth reading has been written about it" (consciousness). At the end of chapter 3, the author makes a rather optimistic conclusion that "So, I do believe we are closing in on what consciousness is and what it's for, I admit...... But we are on our way" (to understand consciousness.) After reading this book in its entirety, the reader is unable to share this author's optimism.

The author attempts to relate sensation to subjective qualia, and consciousness. What is creating the sensation and what makes this to be the subject of it? Could it be consciousness or selfhood? Francis Crick and Christof Koch believe the most difficult problem is the qualia; the redness of red, painfulness of pain, etc. The author believes that neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) may be the causal factor because the experience of sensation is a result of neuronal activity. The other factor could be the functional correlates of sensation (FCC).

Wherever there is a subjective experience, there has to be a subject. Because pain, mood, wish can not exist without a bearer, and the person has to be there first before the subjective experience. Sensation consists of; ownership that belongs to the subject, body location (particular part of the body), present-ness (being at present), qualitative modality (visual, facial, hearing, etc.) and phenomenal immediacy (happening to me instead of somebody else, happening at the moment than another moment). The author surmises that the evolution of sensation, feeling, and perception starting with primitive amoeba and ending up with human beings is as follows: It appears that during evolution the sensory activity gets privatized. The command signals for every sensory response get short circuited before they reach the body surface. So that instead of reaching all the way out to peripheral site of stimulation (as in amoeba), they now reach only to points more and more central on the incoming sensory pathways, until eventually the whole processes becomes closed off from the outside world in an internal loop within the brain (as in humans.)

The book is very brief and it is based on guest lectures delivered at Harvard in spring 2004. Some paragraphs have been repeated verbatim; for example, third paragraphs of pages 94 and 121 are almost the same. It would have been easier for the reader, if the last paragraph of each chapter or the last chapter of the book had summarized the author's point.

1. Consciousness: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions)
2. The Brain: A Very Short Introduction
3. The Quest for Consciousness: A Neurobiological Approach
4. Integral Consciousness and the Future of Evolution
5. Cognition, Brain, and Consciousness: Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience
6. Matter and Consciousness: A Contemporary Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind
7. A Brief Tour of Human Consciousness: From Impostor Poodles to Purple Numbers
8. Consciousness: An Introduction
9. A Universe Of Consciousness How Matter Becomes Imagination
Kabei
This short essay on the origin and function
of human consciousness sums up what the author
has been saying since his first book, thirty years
ago, but in very clear terms, adding the spiritual
dimension (depth time) of consciousness to the
social advantages of it in terms of cooperation and
deception. His naturalist approach reminds me of
Santayana. A veritable delight to read.
Kabei
This short essay on the origin and function
of human consciousness sums up what the author
has been saying since his first book, thirty years
ago, but in very clear terms, adding the spiritual
dimension (depth time) of consciousness to the
social advantages of it in terms of cooperation and
deception. His naturalist approach reminds me of
Santayana. A veritable delight to read.