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Veil Politics in Liberal Democratic States (Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and Public Policy) epub download

by Jeremy Waldron,Ajume H. Wingo


Series: Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and Public Policy

Series: Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and Public Policy. Paperback: 180 pages. Veil Politics manages to be all of these things wrapped into one. It is a learned and articulate book that reads smoothly. It is refreshing in its originality. The book is also useful for less developed countries, where democratic institutions are just now being formed, often with the help of multilateral institutions whose efforts are all-too-often formulaic and seldom inspiring. Institutions are always rooted in cultures and practices and emotional appeals, because they always involve getting people to repeat the same practices over and over and over again.

Series: Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and Public Policy. Waldron, Jeremy 1996. Wingo, Ajume H. 2001b

Series: Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and Public Policy. Recommend to librarian. Multiculturalism and Melange, in Public Education in a Multicultural Society, ed. Robert K. Fullinwider (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996), pp. 90–118. Walzer, Michael 1967. 2001b. Living Legitimacy: A New Approach to Good Government in Africa, New England Journal of Public Policy, Vol. 16, No. 2 (Spring/Summer 2001), pp. 49–71. Cultural Universals and Particulars (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1996).

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Ajume H. Wingo argues that non-rational factors-rhetoric, symbols, and traditions-provide the actual source of motivation in the development and sustainability of the liberal democratic state. Wingo, Jeremy Waldron. Such theorists will typically argue for the basic values of liberal democracies by rationally justifying them. This book argues that it is non-rational factors - rhetoric, symbols, traditions - that more often than not provide the real source of motivation.

July 29, 2014 History. found in the catalog. Published August 18, 2003 by Cambridge University Press. Veil Politics in Liberal Democratic States (Cambridge Studies in Philo. Rhetoric, Political culture, Political aspects, Symbolism in politics, Democracy. Wingo argues that non-rational factors. Start by marking Veil Politics in Liberal Democratic States as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Ajume Wingo is a Cameroonian political and social philosopher who is an associate professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder

Ajume Wingo is a Cameroonian political and social philosopher who is an associate professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Much of his work has focused on the analysis of non-liberal or corrupt democratic states with particular focus on contemporary African states. He has also published articles on African art, aesthetics, and culture, often juxtaposing these with western practices and customs.

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Ajume H. Wingo argues that non-rational factors--rhetoric, symbols, and traditions--provide the actual source of motivation in the development and sustainability of the liberal democratic state. Drawing from historical and philosophical sources, Wingo demonstrates that these "veils" can play an essential role in a thriving, stable liberal democratic state.

Veil Politics in Liberal Democratic States (Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and Public Policy) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0521814386

ISBN: 0521814383

Author: Jeremy Waldron,Ajume H. Wingo

Category: Other

Subcategory: Social Sciences

Language: English

Publisher: Cambridge University Press (August 18, 2003)

Pages: 180 pages

ePUB size: 1732 kb

FB2 size: 1741 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 404

Other Formats: doc txt lit azw

Related to Veil Politics in Liberal Democratic States (Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and Public Policy) ePub books

Ffleg
It is rare to find a book that is at one and the same time brilliant and innovative, lucid and entertaining, and also useful both in the gaps it fills in the literature and in its applicability. Veil Politics manages to be all of these things wrapped into one. It is a learned and articulate book that reads smoothly. It is refreshing in its originality. And it may prove highly useful in the defense of democratic institutions.

Its thesis is that the myths and narratives, memorials and symbols we use to highlight our democratic institutions are necessary for their maintenance. They are necessary because humans are not fully rational and are thus liable to non-rational forms of persuasion. Because we are susceptible to non-rational persuasion there will always be non-rational forces pulling at our attention - the demagogic speaker, the passionate appeal of war making, the pressure to surrender our freedom - and many of these forces will be undemocratic or anti-democratic.

The veils in the title are metaphorical and taken from the actual veils used to accentuate certain features of sculptures. A veil can highlight the strength of a statue's eyes or make its vulnerability more salient. Similarly, we can tell the story of American history with a view toward inspiring the defense of freedom or inclusivity, equality or tolerance. We can emphasize the honesty of George Washington as an object lesson in civic virtue. And we can emphasize the determination of leaders who were also often weak and vacillating. In so doing, we strengthen the emotional appeal of democratic traditions and bring to the rational appeal of the maintenance a more passionate commitment and defense.

None of this is groundbreaking and revelatory in and of itself. Yet it is an important corrective to the Anglo-American tradition of political philosophy, which has tended to emphasize reason at the expense of emotion. Philosophers like John Rawls and Ronald Dworkin may come bearing humanistic gifts, which point the way toward higher human development, but their arguments are all-too-often dry-as-dust. What's worse, the content dictates the form: the arguments must be dry because they can make their appeal only to reason. For in analytic philosophy, which comprises the vast bulk of Anglo-American philosophy, only reasoned arguments matter. Professor Wingo argues from within this tradition and handily defends his position against attack, emphasizing several conditions for the use of veils, which would prevent them from being used deceptively or manipulatively.

The usefulness of such an argument is readily apparent. Fascists and demagogues are defeating liberal democrats the world over. The programs of liberal democrats seem old and worn out, their appeals lack emotion. It is always possible that the rise of liberal democracy was conditional upon some set of circumstances, say a large middle class or high levels of economic equality, whose passing in the twenty-first century will spell its end. What we need is some formula for vigorously defending the democratic institutions we so recently took for granted, and to do so without sacrificing reason at the alter of passion, and veil politics sets the mold.

The book is also useful for less developed countries, where democratic institutions are just now being formed, often with the help of multilateral institutions whose efforts are all-too-often formulaic and seldom inspiring. Institutions are always rooted in cultures and practices and emotional appeals, because they always involve getting people to repeat the same practices over and over and over again. Hence, Nigerians will not warm to democracy if their leaders are corrupt and their institutions broken unless democracy can be made appealing to the heart. Allegiance to these institutions will not last when a charismatic leader, who insists on staying in power comes along, unless a people can be tied to them through myths and traditions, symbols and monuments. And this is where the skillful use of veils can strengthen liberal democratic institutions.

In this sense, veil politics is the soul of democracy; it brings a desperately needed aesthetic dimension to the argument for democratic institutions. And it opens the way for the more skillful use of emotional appeals among liberal democrats, while simultaneously laying down conditions for the use of these appeals.

But I believe the argument could be pushed further. I believe it would have been possible to argue that nothing can be expressed without some form of veiling. The diction of a sentence, which words are picked over other words; the syntax of a sentence, the word order being laid down before your eyes; the rhythmic use of punctuation and repetition; the subtle metaphors that frame arguments; all impact the meaning of a sentence, and are used, brick upon brick, in the construction of arguments, which always appeal to something more than reason. Similarly, the judicious use of logic and illustration, the author's tone, the norms of communication, the tendency to turn self-reflexive or wax rhapsodic in speculation, are not merely incidental but constituent parts of an argument, because they impact the things we will remember and the things we will forget. They tell us what is most salient and meaningful, and they locate a work within a tradition, which may be either dead and antiquated or vibrant and alive.

Arguments and books are veils as well. The Federalist Papers and Democracy in America are both constituent parts of the American tradition, as is Thoreau's, On the Duty of Civil Disobedience, and Frederick Douglass's slave narrative. These all go into making up the American political tradition and provide answers to who we are as a people; but they are also key pillars of our democratic institutions, because without them, those institutions might not stand. In short, veils are everywhere, framing in the way we speak and welcome strangers, the way we portray difference and narrate the news.

And if we fail to use them skillfully and consciously, we forfeit their use to the most manipulative would be power-seekers. But we also leave the experience of state institutions, which shape virtually every aspect of every other institutions, void of meaning. Veil Politics does not venture into this territory, but it extends aesthetic considerations into a vastly more expansive notion of what liberal democratic institutions are and what they do. All of this is immensely interesting and entertaining, but it is also vitally important in a world in which those institutions are increasingly under threat.

Liberals need all the help they can get today, and political philosophers could do a better job of helping them make their appeal. Veil Politics in Liberal Democratic States will be a useful tool for defenders of democracy. I highly recommend it for the serious student of political philosophy - whether undergraduate or professor; to the democratic leader, and their speech writers, seeking a way to honestly appeal to the heart; and to the activist, who needs some guidelines to keep them honest.

Full disclosure, I am just about to begin studying with professor Wingo but was drawn to studying with him precisely because of the quality of his writings.

Theo Horesh, author of Convergence: The Globalization of Mind; and The Inner Climate: Global Warming from the Inside Out.
Ffleg
It is rare to find a book that is at one and the same time brilliant and innovative, lucid and entertaining, and also useful both in the gaps it fills in the literature and in its applicability. Veil Politics manages to be all of these things wrapped into one. It is a learned and articulate book that reads smoothly. It is refreshing in its originality. And it may prove highly useful in the defense of democratic institutions.

Its thesis is that the myths and narratives, memorials and symbols we use to highlight our democratic institutions are necessary for their maintenance. They are necessary because humans are not fully rational and are thus liable to non-rational forms of persuasion. Because we are susceptible to non-rational persuasion there will always be non-rational forces pulling at our attention - the demagogic speaker, the passionate appeal of war making, the pressure to surrender our freedom - and many of these forces will be undemocratic or anti-democratic.

The veils in the title are metaphorical and taken from the actual veils used to accentuate certain features of sculptures. A veil can highlight the strength of a statue's eyes or make its vulnerability more salient. Similarly, we can tell the story of American history with a view toward inspiring the defense of freedom or inclusivity, equality or tolerance. We can emphasize the honesty of George Washington as an object lesson in civic virtue. And we can emphasize the determination of leaders who were also often weak and vacillating. In so doing, we strengthen the emotional appeal of democratic traditions and bring to the rational appeal of the maintenance a more passionate commitment and defense.

None of this is groundbreaking and revelatory in and of itself. Yet it is an important corrective to the Anglo-American tradition of political philosophy, which has tended to emphasize reason at the expense of emotion. Philosophers like John Rawls and Ronald Dworkin may come bearing humanistic gifts, which point the way toward higher human development, but their arguments are all-too-often dry-as-dust. What's worse, the content dictates the form: the arguments must be dry because they can make their appeal only to reason. For in analytic philosophy, which comprises the vast bulk of Anglo-American philosophy, only reasoned arguments matter. Professor Wingo argues from within this tradition and handily defends his position against attack, emphasizing several conditions for the use of veils, which would prevent them from being used deceptively or manipulatively.

The usefulness of such an argument is readily apparent. Fascists and demagogues are defeating liberal democrats the world over. The programs of liberal democrats seem old and worn out, their appeals lack emotion. It is always possible that the rise of liberal democracy was conditional upon some set of circumstances, say a large middle class or high levels of economic equality, whose passing in the twenty-first century will spell its end. What we need is some formula for vigorously defending the democratic institutions we so recently took for granted, and to do so without sacrificing reason at the alter of passion, and veil politics sets the mold.

The book is also useful for less developed countries, where democratic institutions are just now being formed, often with the help of multilateral institutions whose efforts are all-too-often formulaic and seldom inspiring. Institutions are always rooted in cultures and practices and emotional appeals, because they always involve getting people to repeat the same practices over and over and over again. Hence, Nigerians will not warm to democracy if their leaders are corrupt and their institutions broken unless democracy can be made appealing to the heart. Allegiance to these institutions will not last when a charismatic leader, who insists on staying in power comes along, unless a people can be tied to them through myths and traditions, symbols and monuments. And this is where the skillful use of veils can strengthen liberal democratic institutions.

In this sense, veil politics is the soul of democracy; it brings a desperately needed aesthetic dimension to the argument for democratic institutions. And it opens the way for the more skillful use of emotional appeals among liberal democrats, while simultaneously laying down conditions for the use of these appeals.

But I believe the argument could be pushed further. I believe it would have been possible to argue that nothing can be expressed without some form of veiling. The diction of a sentence, which words are picked over other words; the syntax of a sentence, the word order being laid down before your eyes; the rhythmic use of punctuation and repetition; the subtle metaphors that frame arguments; all impact the meaning of a sentence, and are used, brick upon brick, in the construction of arguments, which always appeal to something more than reason. Similarly, the judicious use of logic and illustration, the author's tone, the norms of communication, the tendency to turn self-reflexive or wax rhapsodic in speculation, are not merely incidental but constituent parts of an argument, because they impact the things we will remember and the things we will forget. They tell us what is most salient and meaningful, and they locate a work within a tradition, which may be either dead and antiquated or vibrant and alive.

Arguments and books are veils as well. The Federalist Papers and Democracy in America are both constituent parts of the American tradition, as is Thoreau's, On the Duty of Civil Disobedience, and Frederick Douglass's slave narrative. These all go into making up the American political tradition and provide answers to who we are as a people; but they are also key pillars of our democratic institutions, because without them, those institutions might not stand. In short, veils are everywhere, framing in the way we speak and welcome strangers, the way we portray difference and narrate the news.

And if we fail to use them skillfully and consciously, we forfeit their use to the most manipulative would be power-seekers. But we also leave the experience of state institutions, which shape virtually every aspect of every other institutions, void of meaning. Veil Politics does not venture into this territory, but it extends aesthetic considerations into a vastly more expansive notion of what liberal democratic institutions are and what they do. All of this is immensely interesting and entertaining, but it is also vitally important in a world in which those institutions are increasingly under threat.

Liberals need all the help they can get today, and political philosophers could do a better job of helping them make their appeal. Veil Politics in Liberal Democratic States will be a useful tool for defenders of democracy. I highly recommend it for the serious student of political philosophy - whether undergraduate or professor; to the democratic leader, and their speech writers, seeking a way to honestly appeal to the heart; and to the activist, who needs some guidelines to keep them honest.

Full disclosure, I am just about to begin studying with professor Wingo but was drawn to studying with him precisely because of the quality of his writings.

Theo Horesh, author of Convergence: The Globalization of Mind; and The Inner Climate: Global Warming from the Inside Out.
MarF
A great look at the way certain symbols (speeches, monuments, history ...) influence Democratic behavior in society. These symbols or veils are looked at from a number of angles that provoke serious contemplation of the nature of liberelism and autonomy.

Professor Wingo also introduces the concept of actually manipulating these symbols in order to achieve a desired Democratic behavior.

This book presents an important philosophical argument in a well-organized and easy to grasp fashion. A great accompaniment to any study of history and politics.
MarF
A great look at the way certain symbols (speeches, monuments, history ...) influence Democratic behavior in society. These symbols or veils are looked at from a number of angles that provoke serious contemplation of the nature of liberelism and autonomy.

Professor Wingo also introduces the concept of actually manipulating these symbols in order to achieve a desired Democratic behavior.

This book presents an important philosophical argument in a well-organized and easy to grasp fashion. A great accompaniment to any study of history and politics.
Yggfyn
Every so often you come across a gem of a book that keeps getting better. If only this sort of writing was taught in our schools / colleges

Its breadth is awesome for Plato's philosopher king to the Gettysburg address and on through 911 and what we could do to "Really "make the world a better place , wow.

This type of vision and understanding about America is so sadly lacking in this day and age and then you find the author is a "real " prince from Cameroon in West Africa and a double wow emerges.

Having met him over a glorious long session at Starbucks in Boulder I can tell you he is definitely " the real deal "

Go spend a weekend with "the veil " its got so many things close to the heart of America I cannot list them

Should be a must have for every school and college in the US and every candidate running for election needs grilling on Ajumes incredible book

( : ( : pete
Yggfyn
Every so often you come across a gem of a book that keeps getting better. If only this sort of writing was taught in our schools / colleges

Its breadth is awesome for Plato's philosopher king to the Gettysburg address and on through 911 and what we could do to "Really "make the world a better place , wow.

This type of vision and understanding about America is so sadly lacking in this day and age and then you find the author is a "real " prince from Cameroon in West Africa and a double wow emerges.

Having met him over a glorious long session at Starbucks in Boulder I can tell you he is definitely " the real deal "

Go spend a weekend with "the veil " its got so many things close to the heart of America I cannot list them

Should be a must have for every school and college in the US and every candidate running for election needs grilling on Ajumes incredible book

( : ( : pete