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The Hidden Face of Eve: Women in the Arab World epub download

by Nawal El Saadawi


Nawal El Saadawi was born in 1931, in a small village outside Cairo. In July 2005, however, she was forced to withdraw her candidacy in the face of ongoing government persecution.

Nawal El Saadawi was born in 1931, in a small village outside Cairo. Unusually, she and her brothers and sisters were educated together, and she graduated from the University of Cairo Medical School in 1955, specializing in psychiatry. For two years, she practiced as a medical doctor, both at the university and in her native Tahla. Nawal El Saadawi has achieved widespread international recognition for her work. She holds honorary doctorates from the universities of York, Illinois at Chicago, St Andrews and Tromso.

Nawal El Saadawi (Arabic: نوال السعداوي‎, born 27 October 1931) is an Egyptian feminist writer, activist, physician, and psychiatrist. She has written many books on the subject of women in Islam, paying particular attention to the practice of female. She has written many books on the subject of women in Islam, paying particular attention to the practice of female genital mutilation in her society. She has been described as "the Simone de Beauvoir of the Arab World". She is founder and president of the Arab Women's Solidarity Association and co-founder of the Arab Association for Human Rights.

Nawal El Saadawi is a radical, and this book clearly illustrates that. A brilliant discourse regarding women's standing in the arab world by one of the most intelligent and outspoken feminists of all time.

Nawal El Saadawi writes out of a powerful sense of the violence and injustice which permeated her society. Her experiences working as a doctor in villages around Egypt, witnessing prostitution, honour killings and sexual abuse, including female circumcision, drove her to give voice to this suffering. She goes on to explore the causes of the situation through a discussion of the historical role of Arab women in religion and literature. Saadawi argues that the veil, polygamy and legal inequality are incompatible with the essence of Islam or any human faith.

El Saadawi is an Egyptian feminist activist and a psychiatrist who originally published this book in Arabic in 1977. During her career she worked at several universities in the United States. She has had a tumultuous relationship with the Egyptian government and was imprisoned after criticizing former President Anwar Sadat. The Hidden Face of Eve: Women in the Arab World has seamlessly incorporated elements of memoir and critical analysis of Arab culture and Islam. El Saadawi divides the book into four sections: The Mutilated Half, Women in History, The Arab Woman, and Breaking Through.

Nawal Al-Sa'Dawi's book The Hidden Face of Eve is absolutely essential to any global study of feminism.

In HIDDEN FACE OF EVE she clearly establishes herself as Egypt's most outspoken feminist. Nawal Al-Sa'Dawi's book The Hidden Face of Eve is absolutely essential to any global study of feminism. While it's true that the book was written in the 70s, it's important to note that many of the subjects Sa'Dawi examines are timeless - especially with regard to patriarchy - which in many of its manifestations - remains unchanged to this day and is not emblematic of any single nation, or of any single religious dogma.

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El Saadawi’s experiences working as a doctor in Egyptian villages, witnessing forced prostitution, honor killings, sexual abuse, and female circumcision, drove her to pen this book.

Place of Publication. Egyptian novelist, doctor and militant writer on Arab women's problems and their struggle for liberation, Nawal el Saadawi was born in the village of Kafr Tahla. Refusing to accept the limitations imposed by both religious and colonial oppression on most women of rural origin, she qualified as a doctor in 1955 and rose to become Egypt's Director of Public Health. Since she began to write over 30 years ago, her books have concentrated on women.

Prostitution: The Enconomics of Sex and Power Dynamics in El Saadawi’s Woman At Point Zero, Adimora-Ezeigbo’s Trafficked and Unigwe’s On Black Sisters Street.

This powerful account of the oppression of women in the Muslim world remains as shocking today as when it was first published, more than a quarter of a century ago. Nawal El Saadawi writes out of a powerful sense of the violence and injustice which permeated her society. Her experiences working as a doctor in villages around Egypt, witnessing prostitution, honour killings and sexual abuse, including female circumcision, drove her to give voice to this suffering. She goes on explore the causes of the situation through a discussion of the historical role of Arab women in religion and literature. Saadawi argues that the veil, polygamy and legal inequality are incompatible with the essence of Islam or any human faith.

The Hidden Face of Eve: Women in the Arab World epub download

ISBN13: 978-0905762517

ISBN: 0905762517

Author: Nawal El Saadawi

Category: Other

Subcategory: Social Sciences

Language: English

Publisher: Zed Books; Later Printing edition (May 15, 1980)

Pages: 224 pages

ePUB size: 1504 kb

FB2 size: 1525 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 690

Other Formats: docx lit lrf mbr

Related to The Hidden Face of Eve: Women in the Arab World ePub books

Ueledavi
It appears that most of Saadawi's books were written and published during the early 1980s, with nothing really new thereafter, besides reprints. She had her own website in 2009, in which she noted her displeasure with U.S. President Obama's speech to Muslims in Cairo, Egypt. In HIDDEN FACE OF EVE she reveals that she is anti-capitalistic, and supports some form of a socialist economy. In HIDDEN FACE OF EVE she clearly establishes herself as Egypt's most outspoken feminist. She opposes any genital mutilation of girls, and rails against fundamentalist Arab governments that curtail educational opportunities for women, and rebukes the Muslim cultural norms whereby men prevent women from having the same `human rights' that men have: easy divorce, owning property, voting, dating, etc. She was imprisoned for a month in 1981 for opposing Egyptian Pres. Sadat's recognizing the existence of the Jewish state of Israel. Rather than recognizing the stronger fighting spirit of Israeli soldiers during the 1967 Six Day War, or the lack of battle stamina of the Arab soldiers, Saasadawi offered a novel idea as to why the Israeli military routed the Palestinians from Palestine: because the Palestinian males were so afraid that the Israeli soldiers might abuse captured Palestinian women, instead of defending their homeland, "one of the factors that forced the Arabs to leave the West Bank of Jordan during the 1967 war was their desire to protect the `honour' of their womenfolk" (p. 2); flee, instead of fighting! Heroism, indeed! The author faults the psychologist Freud in misunderstanding women (p. 152). She writes a lot of detailed analysis in explaining why the male-dominated Muslim culture so oppresses women. She rebukes the Islamic idea that women are Satan's handmaidens. She refers very frequently to the Quran/Koran and the ahadith to either support her feminist beliefs or to rebuke Muslim male malevolence. Nonetheless, she still concludes that Islam is the solution rather than the problem for women -- if only the male imams would recognize Eve's sexual enlightenment that is hidden beneath her veil.
Ueledavi
It appears that most of Saadawi's books were written and published during the early 1980s, with nothing really new thereafter, besides reprints. She had her own website in 2009, in which she noted her displeasure with U.S. President Obama's speech to Muslims in Cairo, Egypt. In HIDDEN FACE OF EVE she reveals that she is anti-capitalistic, and supports some form of a socialist economy. In HIDDEN FACE OF EVE she clearly establishes herself as Egypt's most outspoken feminist. She opposes any genital mutilation of girls, and rails against fundamentalist Arab governments that curtail educational opportunities for women, and rebukes the Muslim cultural norms whereby men prevent women from having the same `human rights' that men have: easy divorce, owning property, voting, dating, etc. She was imprisoned for a month in 1981 for opposing Egyptian Pres. Sadat's recognizing the existence of the Jewish state of Israel. Rather than recognizing the stronger fighting spirit of Israeli soldiers during the 1967 Six Day War, or the lack of battle stamina of the Arab soldiers, Saasadawi offered a novel idea as to why the Israeli military routed the Palestinians from Palestine: because the Palestinian males were so afraid that the Israeli soldiers might abuse captured Palestinian women, instead of defending their homeland, "one of the factors that forced the Arabs to leave the West Bank of Jordan during the 1967 war was their desire to protect the `honour' of their womenfolk" (p. 2); flee, instead of fighting! Heroism, indeed! The author faults the psychologist Freud in misunderstanding women (p. 152). She writes a lot of detailed analysis in explaining why the male-dominated Muslim culture so oppresses women. She rebukes the Islamic idea that women are Satan's handmaidens. She refers very frequently to the Quran/Koran and the ahadith to either support her feminist beliefs or to rebuke Muslim male malevolence. Nonetheless, she still concludes that Islam is the solution rather than the problem for women -- if only the male imams would recognize Eve's sexual enlightenment that is hidden beneath her veil.
Kigabar
I ordered this book because it caught my attention from a quote on another web site. The book is not an easy read but I have learned from it. The seller provided great service and the book is in good condition just as advertised. I would definitely buy from this seller again.
Kigabar
I ordered this book because it caught my attention from a quote on another web site. The book is not an easy read but I have learned from it. The seller provided great service and the book is in good condition just as advertised. I would definitely buy from this seller again.
Marinara
It was what I wanted thankyou. Very enlightning.
Marinara
It was what I wanted thankyou. Very enlightning.
Iarim
Nawal Al-Sa'Dawi's book The Hidden Face of Eve is absolutely essential to any global study of feminism. While it's true that the book was written in the 70s, it's important to note that many of the subjects Sa'Dawi examines are timeless - especially with regard to patriarchy - which in many of its manifestations - remains unchanged to this day and is not emblematic of any single nation, or of any single religious dogma.

Sa'Dawi opens by recounting the night she and her sister were subjected to circumcision. Her child's mind remembers the sound of rasping butcher knives, and the account is both heart wrenching, and yet somehow, removed. Sa'Dawi emphasizes that female circumcision, or FGM, is NOT Islamic - despite what many Egyptians mistakenly believe - and openly condemns the procedure in all its various extremes.

One cannot help but feel enormous respect for Sa'Dawi for her work as a doctor in poverty stricken villages, for her outspoken and vigilant opposition to inequity, - even within her own family - and for her graceful scholarly look at the history of the oppression of women. Indeed, Sa'Dawi's political activities led to her imprisonment under Sadat, but she continues to work for the cause of social justice even under the current political milieu which has, yet again, sought to silence her. Nawal Al-Sa'Dawi considered running for president, but withdrew her candidacy because she was repeatedly kept from legitimately campaigning. It's a shame that Mubarak is unwilling to have an open election. Could he be afraid of losing to a woman?

Initially I was drawn to Nawal Al-Sa'Dawi because the idea of Egyptian feminism, or Islamic feminism seemed wholly unexplored by western scholars. Her examination of the veil, or hijab, and its origins is put into both historical and Islamic context. Truly over the years the veil has come to mean many different things to different people. In a world where the word `terrorism' and `islam' have become almost synonymous it's more important than ever to understand the mentality of post-colonialism. Today, Arab youth are daily striving for an identity which is independent of western influence - enter Islamism, enter the veil, enter the extremism we see reported daily in the news.

An absolute MUST-READ for anyone seeking to understand patriarchy, post-colonialism, Islamic culture, and what motivates the current trend in Islamic countries toward extremism...
Iarim
Nawal Al-Sa'Dawi's book The Hidden Face of Eve is absolutely essential to any global study of feminism. While it's true that the book was written in the 70s, it's important to note that many of the subjects Sa'Dawi examines are timeless - especially with regard to patriarchy - which in many of its manifestations - remains unchanged to this day and is not emblematic of any single nation, or of any single religious dogma.

Sa'Dawi opens by recounting the night she and her sister were subjected to circumcision. Her child's mind remembers the sound of rasping butcher knives, and the account is both heart wrenching, and yet somehow, removed. Sa'Dawi emphasizes that female circumcision, or FGM, is NOT Islamic - despite what many Egyptians mistakenly believe - and openly condemns the procedure in all its various extremes.

One cannot help but feel enormous respect for Sa'Dawi for her work as a doctor in poverty stricken villages, for her outspoken and vigilant opposition to inequity, - even within her own family - and for her graceful scholarly look at the history of the oppression of women. Indeed, Sa'Dawi's political activities led to her imprisonment under Sadat, but she continues to work for the cause of social justice even under the current political milieu which has, yet again, sought to silence her. Nawal Al-Sa'Dawi considered running for president, but withdrew her candidacy because she was repeatedly kept from legitimately campaigning. It's a shame that Mubarak is unwilling to have an open election. Could he be afraid of losing to a woman?

Initially I was drawn to Nawal Al-Sa'Dawi because the idea of Egyptian feminism, or Islamic feminism seemed wholly unexplored by western scholars. Her examination of the veil, or hijab, and its origins is put into both historical and Islamic context. Truly over the years the veil has come to mean many different things to different people. In a world where the word `terrorism' and `islam' have become almost synonymous it's more important than ever to understand the mentality of post-colonialism. Today, Arab youth are daily striving for an identity which is independent of western influence - enter Islamism, enter the veil, enter the extremism we see reported daily in the news.

An absolute MUST-READ for anyone seeking to understand patriarchy, post-colonialism, Islamic culture, and what motivates the current trend in Islamic countries toward extremism...
digytal soul
Interesting look at Egyptian women's lives. It sounded like the 1950's or 60's but I was surprised to see the book was published in 1980. I hope things have improved since then but I think her observation that women will continue to be subjugated by men as long as they do not have any valid means of supporting themselves is fairly true. It was a bit of a surprise to read her theory linking the evils of Capitalism and women's issues- freeing women from unpaid labour in the house to being used as a cheap sources of Labour.
digytal soul
Interesting look at Egyptian women's lives. It sounded like the 1950's or 60's but I was surprised to see the book was published in 1980. I hope things have improved since then but I think her observation that women will continue to be subjugated by men as long as they do not have any valid means of supporting themselves is fairly true. It was a bit of a surprise to read her theory linking the evils of Capitalism and women's issues- freeing women from unpaid labour in the house to being used as a cheap sources of Labour.
Kanal
Nothing changes, horrific culture...
Kanal
Nothing changes, horrific culture...