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Mechanics: From Newton's laws to deterministic chaos epub download

by Florian Scheck


Florian Scheck The book contains more than 120 problems with complete solutions, as well as some practical examples which make moderate use of personal computers

This book covers all topics in mechanics from elementary Newtonian mechanics, the principles of canonical mechanics and rigid body mechanics to relativistic mechanics and nonlinear dynamics. It was among the first textbooks to include dynamical systems and deterministic chaos in due detail. The book contains more than 120 problems with complete solutions, as well as some practical examples which make moderate use of personal computers. This will be appreciated in particular by students using this textbook to accompany lectures on mechanics.

Florian A. Scheck, professor emeritus at University of Mainz, Germany. Born in 1936, diploma degree 1962, P. From Newton's Laws to Deterministic Chaos. Dr. re. at) 1964, both at U. Freiburg, Germany. Habilitation at U. Heidelberg 1968.

By Florian Scheck: Mechanics: From Newton's Laws to Deterministic Chaos . I found Scheck to be more enlightening regards the concept of Time, Units, along with a beautiful discussion of Galilei Transformations.

I found Scheck to be more enlightening regards the concept of Time, Units, along with a beautiful discussion of Galilei Transformations. Where Goldstein (Page 14) introduces constraints in his Summary, Scheck discusses constraints in the second chapter. Phase Portraits are introduced, first chapter: Harmonic Oscillator and Planar Pendulum, then, detailed as examples.

This book covers all topics in mechanics from elementary Newtonian mechanics, the principles. Mechanics: From Newton's Laws to Deterministic Chaos. 6 MB·21 Downloads·New! This book covers all topics in mechanics from elementary Newtonian mechanics, the principles. Mechanics: From Newton’s Laws to Deterministic Chaos. 3 MB·9 Downloads·New! elementary Newtonian Mechanics to the discussion of deterministic chaos and continuous systems Mechanics: From Newton's Laws to Deterministic Chaos. 55 MB·6 Downloads·New!

Florian Scheck (auth. Graduate Texts in Physics.

Florian Scheck (auth. This book covers all topics in mechanics from elementary Newtonian mechanics, the principles of canonical mechanics and rigid body mechanics to relativistic mechanics and nonlinear dynamics.

Start by marking Mechanics: From Newton's Laws to Deterministic Chaos as Want to Read

Start by marking Mechanics: From Newton's Laws to Deterministic Chaos as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The book contains numerous problems with complete solutions, and some practical examples. The book ends with some historical remarks on important pioneers in mechanics. This will be appreciated in particular by students using the text to accompnay lectures on mechanics.

Mechanics From Newton's Laws to Deterministic Chaos. Download DOC book format

Mechanics From Newton's Laws to Deterministic Chaos. Mechanics From Newton's Laws to Deterministic Chaos. Download DOC book format.

Scheck's book integrates the various aspects of classical mechanics, relativistic mechanics, and modern topics such as deterministic chaos

Scheck's book integrates the various aspects of classical mechanics, relativistic mechanics, and modern topics such as deterministic chaos. Both the physical approach to mechanics and its mathematical foundations are emphasised. With elementary Newtonian mechanics as a starting point, the principles of canonical mechanics in Hamiltonian and Lagrangian formulations are outlined. Rigid bodies are treated in detail, and the basic concepts of special relativity are given. Particular emphasis is put on the geometrical aspects of mechanics, such as geometrical objects on manifolds. Springer Science & Business Media, 9 Mar 2013 - 431 sayfa.

Items related to Mechanics: From Newton's Laws to Deterministic. By its presentation: 528 thick pages, of excellent print quality, hard bounded with a hard cover. Florian Scheck Mechanics: From Newton's Laws to Deterministic Chaos. ISBN 13: 9780387527154. including examples – analytical and numerical -, exercises, solutions and a dictionary-like bibliography of the most famous mechanists.

Mechanics: From Newton's laws to deterministic chaos epub download

ISBN13: 978-3540574750

ISBN: 3540574751

Author: Florian Scheck

Category: Other

Language: English

Publisher: Springer-Verlag; 2nd edition (1994)

Pages: 513 pages

ePUB size: 1896 kb

FB2 size: 1405 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 366

Other Formats: azw rtf txt doc

Related to Mechanics: From Newton's laws to deterministic chaos ePub books

Sataxe
My edition, 1990 first edition, of length 430 pages--differs slightly from the newest edition.
No matter--either edition will make a superb complement to existing treatments.
The preface states "...sufficiently self-contained that it may be useful for independent study...,",happily, this does seem to be the case.
A review of the first edition was given in the SIAM Review (Volume 34, Number 1,March 1992). That review was less than enthusiastic.
My review will be much more enthusiastic. (Not least due to a number of errors in said review: for instance, the discussion of the
Virial Theorem (here, Page 69) does not use the same variable to represent time and kinetic energy--as that SIAM review indicates.
Also, the definition of virtual displacement (here, Page 79) is identical to that found in Goldstein's Second Edition, Classical Mechanics,
and is ( in opposition to the SIAM Review) as accurate a definition as is to be found elsewhere in the physics literature).
This text builds upon foundations of elementary Mechanics. Considerable effort is expended preparing the student for further work
in advanced courses, rather than dwelling on pedestrian problems such as will be discovered in the elementary textbooks.
Thus preparation in elementary mechanics problems should already be firmly in hand. And, if perusing this text, my assumption
is that the student has already solved many of those types of problems (If need be, review the excellent text of Barger and Olsson !).
The most distinguishing feature of this text is its introduction to geometrical methods: Manifolds, Forms, Vector Fields, Symplectics.
We read Scheck: "...In many respects, mechanics carries geometrical structures." Here is Goldstein's 1980 assessment:
"...it is not clear to me that they contribute to the understanding of the physics..." The reader will need to form their own judgement.
However, Scheck's Chapter five--Geometric Aspects of Mechanics--is as lucid an introduction as one will likely find at this level.
Next, both Scheck and Goldstein offer a one chapter--the first--summary of elementary mechanics. I found Scheck to be more
enlightening regards the concept of Time, Units, along with a beautiful discussion of Galilei Transformations.
Where Goldstein (Page 14) introduces constraints in his Summary, Scheck discusses constraints in the second chapter.
Contrasting Goldstein and Scheck makes for an interesting exercise; however, I now turn specifically to the book under review.
Phase Portraits are introduced, first chapter: Harmonic Oscillator and Planar Pendulum, then, detailed as examples.
Scattering and Orbits are paid attention to, as instances of applying Newton's Laws to concrete problems.
We move to the second chapter, Canonical Mechanics: Generalized Coordinates, Lagrangians,Poisson Brackets, Hamiltonians.
The example of a Linear Autonomous System in one dimension is clearly elucidated. The author addresses local versus global
existence of solutions when approaching the Hamilton-Jacobi Equatioons.(As such, examples detailed in Goldstein---sections
10.2 and 10.4---are absent here.). Here, we read (Page 139) : "...a quantum particle does not follow a classical trajectory.
It is described by waves..." This remark, ending an otherwise fine Section 2.36, is perhaps not to be taken literally. The chapter
ends with a brief discussion of small oscillations. Too brief, I fear, to be other than a cursory development. Best to look elsewhere.
But, those are but minor quibbles to an otherwise informative, eighty-page, Chapter Two. Rigid Bodies are up next. The chapter
is a model of lucidity. Section 3.4, properties of Inertia Tensor, is a highlight. Euler Angles--as defined in Quantum Mechanics--
is utilized in this text (See, for differences, Goldstein, Page 147). Again, the emphasis varies a bit from Goldstein--Precession,
in Goldstein-- is detailed in ten pages, here it is given brief mention on two pages. However, there is still much to be learned
in Scheck's lengthy third chapter. Relativistic Mechanics, Chapter Four, is at its most valuable in the discussion of Lorentz
and Poincare Transformations (as befits its copyright, Neutrinos are considered massless--Page 241). Conformal Group ends the
chapter. The pesky introduction of "ict" is nowhere to be found (as it is in 1980, Goldstein !). This makes for excellent pedagogy !
Poisson Brackets are re-introduced-- from another viewpoint-- in the exceptional introduction to Geometric Aspects. The section
which shows the relationship between Lagrange and Hamilton--those geometric aspects--given fresh perspective in Chapter Five.
The text ( first edition) includes an introductory account of Qualitative Dynamics: Flows, Attractors, Poincare, Bifurcations.
Of interest, too, the discussion of Legendre Transformation (Pages 95&96). Compare to Goldstein (Pages 340-341).
The text ends on brief summary of mechanics of continua, which the author states: "....goes far beyond the scope of this book."
Exercises are placed at book's end (say,ten problems per chapter). Many are provided with hints or solutions.
While the text will probably not supplant the venerable Goldstein,
this text does offer another perspective, replete with valuable insights and details.
As such, it is highly recommended.
Sataxe
My edition, 1990 first edition, of length 430 pages--differs slightly from the newest edition.
No matter--either edition will make a superb complement to existing treatments.
The preface states "...sufficiently self-contained that it may be useful for independent study...,",happily, this does seem to be the case.
A review of the first edition was given in the SIAM Review (Volume 34, Number 1,March 1992). That review was less than enthusiastic.
My review will be much more enthusiastic. (Not least due to a number of errors in said review: for instance, the discussion of the
Virial Theorem (here, Page 69) does not use the same variable to represent time and kinetic energy--as that SIAM review indicates.
Also, the definition of virtual displacement (here, Page 79) is identical to that found in Goldstein's Second Edition, Classical Mechanics,
and is ( in opposition to the SIAM Review) as accurate a definition as is to be found elsewhere in the physics literature).
This text builds upon foundations of elementary Mechanics. Considerable effort is expended preparing the student for further work
in advanced courses, rather than dwelling on pedestrian problems such as will be discovered in the elementary textbooks.
Thus preparation in elementary mechanics problems should already be firmly in hand. And, if perusing this text, my assumption
is that the student has already solved many of those types of problems (If need be, review the excellent text of Barger and Olsson !).
The most distinguishing feature of this text is its introduction to geometrical methods: Manifolds, Forms, Vector Fields, Symplectics.
We read Scheck: "...In many respects, mechanics carries geometrical structures." Here is Goldstein's 1980 assessment:
"...it is not clear to me that they contribute to the understanding of the physics..." The reader will need to form their own judgement.
However, Scheck's Chapter five--Geometric Aspects of Mechanics--is as lucid an introduction as one will likely find at this level.
Next, both Scheck and Goldstein offer a one chapter--the first--summary of elementary mechanics. I found Scheck to be more
enlightening regards the concept of Time, Units, along with a beautiful discussion of Galilei Transformations.
Where Goldstein (Page 14) introduces constraints in his Summary, Scheck discusses constraints in the second chapter.
Contrasting Goldstein and Scheck makes for an interesting exercise; however, I now turn specifically to the book under review.
Phase Portraits are introduced, first chapter: Harmonic Oscillator and Planar Pendulum, then, detailed as examples.
Scattering and Orbits are paid attention to, as instances of applying Newton's Laws to concrete problems.
We move to the second chapter, Canonical Mechanics: Generalized Coordinates, Lagrangians,Poisson Brackets, Hamiltonians.
The example of a Linear Autonomous System in one dimension is clearly elucidated. The author addresses local versus global
existence of solutions when approaching the Hamilton-Jacobi Equatioons.(As such, examples detailed in Goldstein---sections
10.2 and 10.4---are absent here.). Here, we read (Page 139) : "...a quantum particle does not follow a classical trajectory.
It is described by waves..." This remark, ending an otherwise fine Section 2.36, is perhaps not to be taken literally. The chapter
ends with a brief discussion of small oscillations. Too brief, I fear, to be other than a cursory development. Best to look elsewhere.
But, those are but minor quibbles to an otherwise informative, eighty-page, Chapter Two. Rigid Bodies are up next. The chapter
is a model of lucidity. Section 3.4, properties of Inertia Tensor, is a highlight. Euler Angles--as defined in Quantum Mechanics--
is utilized in this text (See, for differences, Goldstein, Page 147). Again, the emphasis varies a bit from Goldstein--Precession,
in Goldstein-- is detailed in ten pages, here it is given brief mention on two pages. However, there is still much to be learned
in Scheck's lengthy third chapter. Relativistic Mechanics, Chapter Four, is at its most valuable in the discussion of Lorentz
and Poincare Transformations (as befits its copyright, Neutrinos are considered massless--Page 241). Conformal Group ends the
chapter. The pesky introduction of "ict" is nowhere to be found (as it is in 1980, Goldstein !). This makes for excellent pedagogy !
Poisson Brackets are re-introduced-- from another viewpoint-- in the exceptional introduction to Geometric Aspects. The section
which shows the relationship between Lagrange and Hamilton--those geometric aspects--given fresh perspective in Chapter Five.
The text ( first edition) includes an introductory account of Qualitative Dynamics: Flows, Attractors, Poincare, Bifurcations.
Of interest, too, the discussion of Legendre Transformation (Pages 95&96). Compare to Goldstein (Pages 340-341).
The text ends on brief summary of mechanics of continua, which the author states: "....goes far beyond the scope of this book."
Exercises are placed at book's end (say,ten problems per chapter). Many are provided with hints or solutions.
While the text will probably not supplant the venerable Goldstein,
this text does offer another perspective, replete with valuable insights and details.
As such, it is highly recommended.
Dikus
Although I agree that one might be scared by the presence of sophisticated chapters like the one devoted to differential geometry, I find that this book is the best for an undergraduate level. It begins with Newtonian mechanics (some knowledge on linear algebra and calculus assumed) and covers all the fundamental points of modern mechanics in a rigorous and straightforward way, including a chapter in special relativity and another on dynamical systems and chaos. As it emphasizes the relevant role of symmetries, it naturally leads to quantum mechanics and can be used by advanced undergrad or graduate students interested in the geometrical foundations of mechanics.
Even though it is certainly not the easiest book available, if you have to buy just one, buy this!
Dikus
Although I agree that one might be scared by the presence of sophisticated chapters like the one devoted to differential geometry, I find that this book is the best for an undergraduate level. It begins with Newtonian mechanics (some knowledge on linear algebra and calculus assumed) and covers all the fundamental points of modern mechanics in a rigorous and straightforward way, including a chapter in special relativity and another on dynamical systems and chaos. As it emphasizes the relevant role of symmetries, it naturally leads to quantum mechanics and can be used by advanced undergrad or graduate students interested in the geometrical foundations of mechanics.
Even though it is certainly not the easiest book available, if you have to buy just one, buy this!
Best West
For the listed price of $38US this book is indeed a bargain. It is clearly written with a rational organization of topics and most sections are accompanied with meaningful examples. I especially enjoyed the development of the Hamiltonian. On the other hand, this is not an easy text - you may not be able to watch Jerry Springer as you read it; a basic familiarity calculus, vector analysis and physics will be needed to make any head way at all. I wish I had used this text in college.
Best West
For the listed price of $38US this book is indeed a bargain. It is clearly written with a rational organization of topics and most sections are accompanied with meaningful examples. I especially enjoyed the development of the Hamiltonian. On the other hand, this is not an easy text - you may not be able to watch Jerry Springer as you read it; a basic familiarity calculus, vector analysis and physics will be needed to make any head way at all. I wish I had used this text in college.