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Sensory Integration and the Child: 25th Anniversary Edition epub download

by A. Jean Ayres


A. Jean Ayres began to develop sensory integration theory, as well as the evaluation procedures and intervention strategies that were associated with this framework, in the 1950s. When Sensory Integration and the Child was first published in the late 1970s, many aspects of her work were becoming more widely known.

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All Items CE. Sensory Integration and the Child: 25th Anniversary .

By a. jean ayres, phd; revised and updated pediatrictherapy network.

Published April 1st 2005 by Western Psychological Services. Sensory Integration and the Child (Paperback). Author(s): A. Jean Ayres. ISBN: 0874244374 (ISBN13: 9780874244373). Published December 1st 1979 by Western Psychological Services. Paperback, 191 pages.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Every textbook comes with a 21-day "Any Reason" guarantee. Published by Western Psychological Services.

Provides an extensive and easy-to-use set of checklists and other tools that will be invaluable to every teacher (and parent) who has children with sensory processing challenges. Includes tried-and-true instructions for developing fine-motor, organ. Answers to Questions Teachers Ask about Sensory Integration.

Touchpoints: Birth to 3 : Your Child's Emotional and Behavioral Development.

The Challenging Child: Understanding, Raising, and Enjoying the Five"Difficult" Types of Children 2002. Touchpoints: Birth to 3 : Your Child's Emotional and Behavioral Development.

Ayres, A. Jean (1970). Sensory Integration and the Child. Sensory integration and the child : understanding hidden sensory challenges (25th anniversary e. rev. and updated, by Pediatric Therapy Network e. Western Psychological Services. Los Angeles, CA: Western Psychological Services. Los Angeles, CA: WPS. ISBN 978-087424-437-3.

This classic handbook, from the originator of sensory integration theory, is now available in an updated, parent-friendly edition. Retaining all the features that made the original edition so popular with both parents and professionals, "Sensory Integration and the Child" remains the best book on the subject. With a new foreward by Dr. Florence Clark and commentaries by recognized experts in sensory integration, this volume explains sensory integrative dysfunction, how to recognize it, and what to do about it. Helpful tips, checklists, question-and-answer sections, and parent resources make the new edition more informative and useful. Indispensible reading for parents, this book is also an excellent way to improve communication between therapist, parents and teachers. The original edition was the first book to explicate sensory integrative dysfunction, and this edition offers new insights and helpful updates in an easy-to-use format. Dr. A. Jean Ayres began to develop sensory integration theory, as well as the evaluation procedures and intervention strategies that were associated with this framework, in the 1950s. When the book "Sensory Integration and Child" was first published in the late 1970s, many aspects of her work were becoming more widely known. Although she was a dedicated researcher and educator, Dr. Ayres was foremost a therapist who worked tirelessly to help the children and families who to her therapy clinic. Over and over again, she listened to the frustration parents expressed at not understanding their children's behavior, often followed by relief at having those problems named and explained, and hope when a plan for intervention was offered. Dr. Ayres wrote this book in order to bring a similar sense of relief and hope to families beyond those who were able to come to her clinic. Because she recognized that parents commonly went first to doctors, therapists, and teachers for help with the developmental or educational concerns they had about their children, she also wrote this book to help those professionals assist families as well. Part 1: Sensory Integration and the Brain Chapter 1: What Is Sensory Integration? An Introduction to the Concept Chapter 2: Watching Sensory Integration Develop: The Development of Sensory Integration From Infancy to Middle Childhood Chapter 3:The Nervous System Within: Understanding How the Brain Works and the Importance of Sensation Part 2: Sensory Integrative Dysfunction Chapter 4: What Is Sensory Integrative Dysfunction? Symptoms, Causes, and Levels Chapter 5: Disorders Involving the Vestibular System: The Sense of Movement and How It Influences the Development of Many Skills Chapter 6: Developmental Dyspraxia: The Process of Learning New Motor Skills and Why This Is Hard for Some Children Chapter 7: Tactile Defensiveness: The Sense of Touch and Why Some Children Are More Sensitive Than Others Chapter 8: Visual Perception and Auditory-Language Disorders: The Perception of Sight and Sound and Its Relationship to Learning and Language Chapter 9: The Child With Autism: Understanding the Special Sensory Integration Needs and Challenges Associated With This Diagnosis Part 3: What Can Be Done About the Problem Chapter 10: Assessment and Intervention: How Therapy Using a Sensory Integration Approach Can Help Chapter 11: What Parents Can Do: How Parents Can Help Their Children With Sensory Integrative Dysfunction Appendix A: Chapter Commentaries Appendix B: Literature Reviews Appendix C: Therapeutic Equipment Appendix D: Some Questions Parents Ask- and the Answers

Sensory Integration and the Child: 25th Anniversary Edition epub download

ISBN13: 978-0874244373

ISBN: 0874244374

Author: A. Jean Ayres

Category: Other

Subcategory: Medicine & Health Sciences

Language: English

Publisher: Western Psychological Services; 1 edition (April 1, 2005)

Pages: 211 pages

ePUB size: 1610 kb

FB2 size: 1179 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 798

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Related to Sensory Integration and the Child: 25th Anniversary Edition ePub books

Gholbimand
More professionals that work with children must become familiar with the work of Jean Ayres; in a time of epidemic labeling and drugging of children, it is shocking to me that more mental health, medical, social work and educational professionals are so unaware of sensory integration and the problems that can result when a child suffers sensory integration problems. One piece I would add is that sensory processing problems do not occur out of the blue; they are a tragic consequence of a culture that fails to meet children's most basic attachment needs and need for movement, creation and stimulation. Children are meant to be held in arms, to run, play, climb and reveal in life, not lie in cribs, restrained in carriers, isolated in day care, sitting sedentary at school desks doing paperwork. Although I had a chuckle at how the current edition of the book seemed a bit spoon-fed, as if people's level of intellect had devolved since the 1970's edition, Ayres' gifted information still shines through! Instead of a pill, try sensory integration treatment and homeschooling!
Gholbimand
More professionals that work with children must become familiar with the work of Jean Ayres; in a time of epidemic labeling and drugging of children, it is shocking to me that more mental health, medical, social work and educational professionals are so unaware of sensory integration and the problems that can result when a child suffers sensory integration problems. One piece I would add is that sensory processing problems do not occur out of the blue; they are a tragic consequence of a culture that fails to meet children's most basic attachment needs and need for movement, creation and stimulation. Children are meant to be held in arms, to run, play, climb and reveal in life, not lie in cribs, restrained in carriers, isolated in day care, sitting sedentary at school desks doing paperwork. Although I had a chuckle at how the current edition of the book seemed a bit spoon-fed, as if people's level of intellect had devolved since the 1970's edition, Ayres' gifted information still shines through! Instead of a pill, try sensory integration treatment and homeschooling!
Gtonydne
This is a great book for learning the basics of sensory integration. It seems very helpful for parents and others wanting to learn the basics of Ayres' theory and process. I used this book to try to brief myself for a dissertation. I still feel like I'm a bit unsure of the benefits and how the equipment helps by reading this book but overall, it was informative. It is also a very easy read. I would like to find a more medical/scientific book that explains how sensory integration in fact works. This is the only reason for the 4 stars rather than 5.
Gtonydne
This is a great book for learning the basics of sensory integration. It seems very helpful for parents and others wanting to learn the basics of Ayres' theory and process. I used this book to try to brief myself for a dissertation. I still feel like I'm a bit unsure of the benefits and how the equipment helps by reading this book but overall, it was informative. It is also a very easy read. I would like to find a more medical/scientific book that explains how sensory integration in fact works. This is the only reason for the 4 stars rather than 5.
Mavivasa
My daughter has dyspraxia which, in the age of autism, makes her the odd kid out in the special needs department. We had been struggling with her therapists because not only did they not understand her condition, they had no idea how to treat it.

After more than a year of very little progress with my daughter in all areas, I read this book, and informed my daughter's therapists that I'd like to incorporate Dr. Ayres' suggestions. So far, my daughter has shown incredibly positive, rapid change in behavior. Her OT didn't understand that the fear and defensiveness that she had come to know was not my daughter's "personality" but a result of her sensory integration issues. This book helped me make that point.

I look forward to reading more from Dr. Ayres and gaining more insights. I highly recommend this book for any parent dealing with a child with sensory integration issues, autism, or dyspraxia.
Mavivasa
My daughter has dyspraxia which, in the age of autism, makes her the odd kid out in the special needs department. We had been struggling with her therapists because not only did they not understand her condition, they had no idea how to treat it.

After more than a year of very little progress with my daughter in all areas, I read this book, and informed my daughter's therapists that I'd like to incorporate Dr. Ayres' suggestions. So far, my daughter has shown incredibly positive, rapid change in behavior. Her OT didn't understand that the fear and defensiveness that she had come to know was not my daughter's "personality" but a result of her sensory integration issues. This book helped me make that point.

I look forward to reading more from Dr. Ayres and gaining more insights. I highly recommend this book for any parent dealing with a child with sensory integration issues, autism, or dyspraxia.
Jan
I cannot understand what people consider "defending" and "dissertation" about this book....
Throughout the book I find an easy to understand language with comprehensive explanations of technical term, e.g., in a glossary (yes, this is a concept based on neurology and developmental psychology, so there is some technical language) and with lots of examples and pictures to illustrate the complex concept of how processing and integration information from our senses influences our physical, emotional, cognitive, social development, our view of ourselves and of the world, and our development into successful occupational beings. And Dr. Ayres describes the widespread consequences of disruptions of this neurophysiological process.

This book transforms the reader's view of children - all at a sudden it's not just "behavior" anymore but you start to ask "why does this child behave like this?" To me, this is the most valuable and unique contribution of this book: to make adults step into the shoes of children with difficulties and imagine how it must be to live with some kind of distorted perception of one's own body and the whole world.
Jan
I cannot understand what people consider "defending" and "dissertation" about this book....
Throughout the book I find an easy to understand language with comprehensive explanations of technical term, e.g., in a glossary (yes, this is a concept based on neurology and developmental psychology, so there is some technical language) and with lots of examples and pictures to illustrate the complex concept of how processing and integration information from our senses influences our physical, emotional, cognitive, social development, our view of ourselves and of the world, and our development into successful occupational beings. And Dr. Ayres describes the widespread consequences of disruptions of this neurophysiological process.

This book transforms the reader's view of children - all at a sudden it's not just "behavior" anymore but you start to ask "why does this child behave like this?" To me, this is the most valuable and unique contribution of this book: to make adults step into the shoes of children with difficulties and imagine how it must be to live with some kind of distorted perception of one's own body and the whole world.
Walan
This is a fine book, by a brilliant and enthusiastic researcher, and I would recommend anyone involved in treating developmentally disabled children to read it. They should be aware that not all of it is generally accepted as scientifically proven.
Ayres uses some diagnostic terms that are not in DSM IV and ICD10. I wouldn't hold that against her, because many of the "official"diagnostic entities for childhood neuropsychiatric disorders are fuzzy. Sensory integrative disorder is not a DSM or ICD entity. Dyspraxia is an accepted neurological symptom. "Developmental dyspraxia" and "clumsy child syndrome" are in ICD10 and are used more in Britain. They are called "developmental coordination disorder" in DSM. The term "minimal brain disorder" or MBD is considered obsolete by these two nomenclatures.
The child emerging from the womb must have a hard time making sense of all the sensations coming in from eyes and ears and touch and taste. Ayres believes that many developmental disorders are due to something going wrong with this process. It is a plausible theory, but hard to prove or disprove. The first 130 pages of the book are devoted to developing her theory, and to an overview of the whole of child development, neurology, and the theories of Piaget.
Based on her theories she has produced the Southern California Sensory Integration Test. This is not reviewed in Lezack's "Neuropsychological Assessment."
Based on the results of the SCSIT, occupational therapists trained in Ayres techniques carry out the treatments described in Chapter 10. The results of controlled trials of the treatment are not described in the book, but evidently many parents of afflicted children have found the treatment helpful. It involves four hours a week of treatment over an unspecified length of time, that is at least several months. If this could be proved to be effective it would b well worth the expense and time.
Walan
This is a fine book, by a brilliant and enthusiastic researcher, and I would recommend anyone involved in treating developmentally disabled children to read it. They should be aware that not all of it is generally accepted as scientifically proven.
Ayres uses some diagnostic terms that are not in DSM IV and ICD10. I wouldn't hold that against her, because many of the "official"diagnostic entities for childhood neuropsychiatric disorders are fuzzy. Sensory integrative disorder is not a DSM or ICD entity. Dyspraxia is an accepted neurological symptom. "Developmental dyspraxia" and "clumsy child syndrome" are in ICD10 and are used more in Britain. They are called "developmental coordination disorder" in DSM. The term "minimal brain disorder" or MBD is considered obsolete by these two nomenclatures.
The child emerging from the womb must have a hard time making sense of all the sensations coming in from eyes and ears and touch and taste. Ayres believes that many developmental disorders are due to something going wrong with this process. It is a plausible theory, but hard to prove or disprove. The first 130 pages of the book are devoted to developing her theory, and to an overview of the whole of child development, neurology, and the theories of Piaget.
Based on her theories she has produced the Southern California Sensory Integration Test. This is not reviewed in Lezack's "Neuropsychological Assessment."
Based on the results of the SCSIT, occupational therapists trained in Ayres techniques carry out the treatments described in Chapter 10. The results of controlled trials of the treatment are not described in the book, but evidently many parents of afflicted children have found the treatment helpful. It involves four hours a week of treatment over an unspecified length of time, that is at least several months. If this could be proved to be effective it would b well worth the expense and time.