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Myth and Society in Ancient Greece epub download

by Janet Lloyd,Jean-Pierre Vernant


Myth and Tragedy in Ancient Greece.

Myth and Tragedy in Ancient Greece. This scholarly collection of studies follows Vernant's Myth and Thought and Myth and Tragedy, offering further insights into Greek social structure, concepts of slave production and economic growth, and the efforts of myths to define and shape social choices.

Jean-Pierre Vernant and Pierre Vidal-Naquet are leaders in a contemporary French classical scholarship that has produced a stunning reconfiguration of Greek thought and literature

Jean-Pierre Vernant and Pierre Vidal-Naquet are leaders in a contemporary French classical scholarship that has produced a stunning reconfiguration of Greek thought and literature. Here they provide a disturbing and decidedly nonclassical reading of Greek myth and tragedy and the relationship between them. Jean-Pierre Vernant is Professor Emeritus of Comparative Study of Ancient Religions at the College de France in Paris. Pierre Vidal-Naquet is Director of Studies and Professor of Sociology at the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes in Paris.

Jean-Pierre Vernant was a French historian and anthropologist, specialist in ancient Greece. Influenced by Claude Lévi-Strauss, Vernant developed a structuralist approach to Greek myth, tragedy, and society which would itself be influential among classical scholars. He was an honorary professor at the Collège de France. Born in Provins, France, Vernant at first studied philosophy, recei Jean-Pierre Vernant was a French historian and anthropologist, specialist in ancient Greece

In this groundbreaking study, Jean Pierre-Vernant delineates a compelling new vision of ancient Greece.

In this groundbreaking study, Jean Pierre-Vernant delineates a compelling new vision of ancient Greece. Myth and Society in Ancient Greece takes us far from the calm and familiar images of Polykleitos and the Parthenon to reveal a fundamentally other culture one of slavery, of masks and death, of scapegoats, of ritual hunting and ecstasies. Vernant's provocative discussion of various institutions and practices including war, marriage, and sacrifice details the complex intersection of the religious, social, and. Political structures of ancient Greece.

Jean-Pierre Vernant, Janet Lloyd. In this groundbreaking study, Jean Pierre-Vernant delineates a compelling new vision of ancient Greece. Myth and Society in Ancient Greece takes us far from the calm and familiar images of Polykleitos and the Parthenon to reveal a fundamentally other culture: one of slavery, of masks and death, of scapegoats, of ritual hunting and ecstasies. Vernant's provocative discussion of various institutions and practices including war, marriage, and sacrifice details the complex intersection of the religious, social, and political structures of ancient Greece.

Jean-Pierre Vernant is a Professor in the Collège de France; his book is a collection of essays published over a long period. Walter Burkert is a Professor at Zurich, and the author of a remarkable history of Greek religion in the Archaic and Classical periods, soon to appear in English. The only one of Vernant’s essays which appears here for the first time is an article of more than fifty pages called ‘The Reason of Myth’, which is a slightly amended version of an article on myth written for the Encyclopaedia of the 20th Century.

Myth and Society in Ancient Greece. Jean Bottero, Clarisse Herrenschmidt, Jean Pierre Vernant, Francois Zabbal, Teresa Lavender Fagan (trans. 1. 5 Mb. Myth and Thought Among the Greeks. . 0 Mb. The Cuisine of Sacrifice among the Greeks. Marcel Detienne, Jean-Pierre Vernant (ed., Paula Wissing (trans. 4. 3 Mb. Cunning Intelligence in Greek Culture and Society (European Philosophy and the Human Sciences). Marcel Detienne, Jean-Pierre Vernant, Janet Lloyd (trans.

Jean Pierre-Vernant and Pierre Vidal-Naquet are leaders in a contemporary French classical scholarship that has produced a a stunning . Janet Lloyd is a translator and writer living in England. Distributed for Zone Books.

Jean Pierre-Vernant and Pierre Vidal-Naquet are leaders in a contemporary French classical scholarship that has produced a a stunning reconfiguration of Greek thought and literature. In this work, published here as a single volume, the authors present a disturbing and decidedly non-classical reading of Greek tragedy that insists on its radical discontinuity with our own outlook and with our social, aesthetic, and psychological categories.

In this groundbreaking study, Jean Pierre-Vernant delineates a compelling new vision of ancient Greece. Myth and Society in Ancient Greece takes us far from the calm and familiar images of Polykleitos and the Parthenon to reveal a fundamentally other culture: one of slavery, of masks and death, of scapegoats, of ritual hunting and ecstasies.

Vernant's provocative discussion of various institutions and practices including war, marriage, and sacrifice details the complex intersection of the religious, social, and political structures of ancient Greece. The book concludes with Vernant's authoritative genealogy of the study of myth from antiquity to structuralism and beyond.

Myth and Society in Ancient Greece epub download

ISBN13: 978-0942299175

ISBN: 0942299175

Author: Janet Lloyd,Jean-Pierre Vernant

Category: Other

Subcategory: Humanities

Language: English

Publisher: Zone Books; New ed of 2 Revised ed edition (August 29, 1990)

Pages: 280 pages

ePUB size: 1303 kb

FB2 size: 1495 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 538

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JoldGold
Another welcomed translation of the French scholar, Jean-Pierre Vernant. Building on his previous book "Origens of Greek Thought", Vernant expands to look at Greek society more fully. Overall there is a lack of primary evidence and refernces however that weaken his intriguing suggestions. Not for the non-specialist.
JoldGold
Another welcomed translation of the French scholar, Jean-Pierre Vernant. Building on his previous book "Origens of Greek Thought", Vernant expands to look at Greek society more fully. Overall there is a lack of primary evidence and refernces however that weaken his intriguing suggestions. Not for the non-specialist.
Ddilonyne
This book is the third volume of Jean-Pierre Vernant's work on myth and its connections beyond. The first two, 'Myth and Thought' and 'Myth and Tragedy', develop ideas of linguistic expression, art, tradition and more in ancient Greece. As Vernant states in the introduction, the term 'and' is a polyvalent term in English (and perhaps more so in French) - it 'can carry more than one meaning and may infer not simply juxtaposition but also association or contrast.'

One of the key issues here is the coupling, to what extent is myth present in society, and to what extent is society present in myth? So much of what the modern world knows about Greek culture, particularly the earliest culture, is its mythological worldview and constructs, which have endured better than buildings, languages, political structures and military might. Vernant brings modern theories to bear on the development of Greece as a culture - the first essay looks at issues of class identity and class struggle, with particular attention to the concept of slave-based modes of production and service.

The essay on city-state warfare is an important one; one of the enduring elements of ancient Greece is the legacy of the Peloponnesian war, with relationships that have direct parallels in the modern world. Another kind of relation, marriage, is also examined here in detail with regard to myth structures - to what extent is marriage and idealised state, and how is it practiced in reality? Vernant also looks at the pantheon of the gods as a society unto themselves, and a reflection (however fractured) of the way things are in human society. What does it say that the myths are structured the way they are? How can this set of stories and beings actually be considered a religion? Vernant discusses the ideas of Louis Moulinier in this regard.

Myth changed over time in the Greek culture toward a more full development of history and philosophy. Thucydides is held up as one of the earliest to move away from myth in his exposition of events, resisting heavy-handed application of gods and supernatural forces to the events of the world. In addition to tracing the different ways in which myth is addressed in ancient Greek history, philosophy and literature, Vernant also looks at the development of modern thinking about this topic, including comparative mythology, anthropological/social evolutionary views of mythology, historical philology, and 'postmodern' ideas a la Levi-Strauss and Ricoeur.

For such a scholarly text, it is short on scholarly features - there is no bibliography, no index, and a relatively small amount of endnotes. The text is not easy text to read; this is something for scholars. It is worthwhile in terms of ideas for those interested in the subject.
Ddilonyne
This book is the third volume of Jean-Pierre Vernant's work on myth and its connections beyond. The first two, 'Myth and Thought' and 'Myth and Tragedy', develop ideas of linguistic expression, art, tradition and more in ancient Greece. As Vernant states in the introduction, the term 'and' is a polyvalent term in English (and perhaps more so in French) - it 'can carry more than one meaning and may infer not simply juxtaposition but also association or contrast.'

One of the key issues here is the coupling, to what extent is myth present in society, and to what extent is society present in myth? So much of what the modern world knows about Greek culture, particularly the earliest culture, is its mythological worldview and constructs, which have endured better than buildings, languages, political structures and military might. Vernant brings modern theories to bear on the development of Greece as a culture - the first essay looks at issues of class identity and class struggle, with particular attention to the concept of slave-based modes of production and service.

The essay on city-state warfare is an important one; one of the enduring elements of ancient Greece is the legacy of the Peloponnesian war, with relationships that have direct parallels in the modern world. Another kind of relation, marriage, is also examined here in detail with regard to myth structures - to what extent is marriage and idealised state, and how is it practiced in reality? Vernant also looks at the pantheon of the gods as a society unto themselves, and a reflection (however fractured) of the way things are in human society. What does it say that the myths are structured the way they are? How can this set of stories and beings actually be considered a religion? Vernant discusses the ideas of Louis Moulinier in this regard.

Myth changed over time in the Greek culture toward a more full development of history and philosophy. Thucydides is held up as one of the earliest to move away from myth in his exposition of events, resisting heavy-handed application of gods and supernatural forces to the events of the world. In addition to tracing the different ways in which myth is addressed in ancient Greek history, philosophy and literature, Vernant also looks at the development of modern thinking about this topic, including comparative mythology, anthropological/social evolutionary views of mythology, historical philology, and 'postmodern' ideas a la Levi-Strauss and Ricoeur.

For such a scholarly text, it is short on scholarly features - there is no bibliography, no index, and a relatively small amount of endnotes. The text is not easy text to read; this is something for scholars. It is worthwhile in terms of ideas for those interested in the subject.