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Signifying Nothing: The Semiotics of Zero epub download

by Brian Rotman


Rotman builds a viable thesis for the semiotics of zero via a thorough examination of Montaigne’s Essays . A delightful little book about the history of zero. But by no means is it a history of nothing.

Rotman builds a viable thesis for the semiotics of zero via a thorough examination of Montaigne’s Essays, Shakespeare’s King Lear, the Kabbalah, and Vermeer’s paintings. A delightful analysis. It tells the story of how the zero was invented in India (perhaps out of philosophic necessity demanded by Vedic cosmology), then traveled over to the Arab world, giving birth to al-gebra eventually, and later still, arriving in Europe in the very early dawn of the Renaissance.

Signifying Nothing book. Rotman builds a viable thesis for the semiotics of zero via a thorough examination of Montaigne’s Essays, Shakespeare’s King Lear, the Kabbalah, and Vermeer’s paintings.

Download with Google. Signifying nothing: The semiotics of zero.

Signifying nothing The semiotics of zero. Content uploaded by Brian Rotman. Rotman has specified a triadic conception of the mathematical subject, drawing inspiration from Peirce’s semiotics. This paper interrogates Rotman’s discussion by imposing a different theoretical framework recontextualised by Dowling from Hjelmslev.

Brian Rotman’s monograph on the semiotics of zero is an unusual work for two reasons

Brian Rotman’s monograph on the semiotics of zero is an unusual work for two reasons. First, it breaks the ever more damaging divorce between science and the analysis of culture by taking mathematics as the key system for its exploration of conceptual changes in the Renaissance: the introduction of the Hindu zero in mathematics, the development of perspective in painting, the development of imaginary money

Signifying nothing: The semiotics of zero. An Essay in Corporeal Semiotics. Becoming beside ourselves: The alphabet, ghosts, and distributed human being.

Signifying nothing: The semiotics of zero. The Ghost in Turing's Machine: Taking God Out of Mathematics and Putting the Body Back In. Duke University Press, 2008.

Rotman’s best known books include Signifying Nothing: The Semiotics of Zero which provides a. .In that year his essay Signifying Nothing: the Semiotics of Zero on the cultural significance of the mathematical zero sign was published

Rotman’s best known books include Signifying Nothing: The Semiotics of Zero which provides a wide-ranging exploration of the zero sign, Ad Infinitu. he Ghost in Turing’s Machine, and Theory of Sets and Transfinite Numbers (written jointly with G. T. Kneebone). In that year his essay Signifying Nothing: the Semiotics of Zero on the cultural significance of the mathematical zero sign was published. In 1990 he and his wife Lesley Ferris, an American theatre director and academic, and their two daughters, emigrated to the United States and lived in Memphis, Tennessee for 6 years.

The Semiotics of Zero. price for USA (gross). Absence of an Origin.

Signifying nothing : the semiotics of zero. Personal Name: Rotman, Brian (DE-576)162799195. Signifying nothing : the semiotics of zero. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Book's title: Signifying nothing : the semiotics of zero. National Bibliographic Agency Control Number: (OCoLC)16873819. Publication, Distribution, et. Basingstoke.

This book portrays the introduction of the mathematical sign zero as a major signifying event, both within the writing of numbers and as an emblem of parallel events in other sign systems.

ISBN 13: 9780333439203. This book portrays the introduction of the mathematical sign zero as a major signifying event, both within the writing of numbers and as an emblem of parallel events in other sign systems. From the Back Cover: "A delightful analysis. Adopting an interdisciplinary approach

This unusual book is a delightful analysis of the nature of zero as a sign intimately connected to the idea of nothing. Rotman draws interesting parallels using the textual code systems of mathematics, painting, and economic exchange and their respective meta-signs -- zero, the vanishing point, imaginary money -- which represent the absence of certain signs. Focusing on the Renaissance period, the author argues that the introduction of a meta-sign disrupts a code system that prompts the creating of new sign systems, as represented by the multifarious transitions from Roman to Hindu numerals, from iconic to perspective art, and from gold money to imaginary bank money. Adopting an interdisciplinary approach...Rotman builds a viable thesis for the semiotics of zero via a thorough examination of Montaigne's 'Essays,' Shakespeare's 'King Lear', the 'Kabbalah,' and Vermeer's paintings. - Choice

Signifying Nothing: The Semiotics of Zero epub download

ISBN13: 978-0804721295

ISBN: 0804721297

Author: Brian Rotman

Category: Other

Subcategory: Humanities

Language: English

Publisher: Stanford University Press; Reprint edition (July 1, 1993)

Pages: 122 pages

ePUB size: 1573 kb

FB2 size: 1179 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 551

Other Formats: doc mbr txt mobi

Related to Signifying Nothing: The Semiotics of Zero ePub books

Dibei
A clear explanation of the origins and concepts of zer
Dibei
A clear explanation of the origins and concepts of zer
Weernis
A delightful little book about the history of zero. But by no means is it a history of nothing. It tells the story of how the zero was invented in India (perhaps out of philosophic necessity demanded by Vedic cosmology), then traveled over to the Arab world, giving birth to al-gebra eventually, and later still, arriving in Europe in the very early dawn of the Renaissance. That much we know. Rotman goes on to discuss the havoc the little non-number that was so incomprehensible to the Romans(they didn't have a symbol for it) wreaked on the European world-view. Among its doings: The deconstruction of the flat planar pictorial representation of the Midle Ages into a proto-cyber 3-D optical illusion by way of the vanishing point, another manifestation of the zero, in pictorial terms. The zero is shown to have gone on to radically alter the concept of money, its management, generation, and financial exchange following the rise of paper money with lots of zero's on 'em. Something we now take for granted was not always that way and Rotman shows the roadblocks set up by the Hellenic-Roman-Christian cosmologies that prevented earlier appropriation of the concept in the western world.
"Nothing comes of Nothing!", cried King Lear.
Speaking of King Lear, he is invoked in the book as well as Montagigne, the Kabbalah, Vermeer's paintings, and Renaissance architectural perspectives.

In short, the zero and its manipulation is what made possible the rise of the West as the engine of modernity. The idea of Nothing, numerically represented as zero (invented to keep Infinitity company), is (or was) of course the sine qua non of the East. But in the West it was and still is, by and large a metaphysical albatross around the neck of many a thinker, despite their ability to manipulate it like nobody before them. How ironic that the zero is what made the possibility of total annihilation possible in our time.

This book, with its erudition-lite, allows you to think about how the Vedic origin of the zero might relate to the idea put forth by Sloterdyjk in his "Critique of Cynical Reason". Namely, that for the West, the nuclear missile in its silo is the Buddha -- in its infinite stillness, silence, acceptance of the inevitable, and self-negation. The bomb is the zero manifest awaiting its ecstasy to come on ground zero.
There are other books out there on the theme of zero but I think this one is most philosophically thought-provoking.
Weernis
A delightful little book about the history of zero. But by no means is it a history of nothing. It tells the story of how the zero was invented in India (perhaps out of philosophic necessity demanded by Vedic cosmology), then traveled over to the Arab world, giving birth to al-gebra eventually, and later still, arriving in Europe in the very early dawn of the Renaissance. That much we know. Rotman goes on to discuss the havoc the little non-number that was so incomprehensible to the Romans(they didn't have a symbol for it) wreaked on the European world-view. Among its doings: The deconstruction of the flat planar pictorial representation of the Midle Ages into a proto-cyber 3-D optical illusion by way of the vanishing point, another manifestation of the zero, in pictorial terms. The zero is shown to have gone on to radically alter the concept of money, its management, generation, and financial exchange following the rise of paper money with lots of zero's on 'em. Something we now take for granted was not always that way and Rotman shows the roadblocks set up by the Hellenic-Roman-Christian cosmologies that prevented earlier appropriation of the concept in the western world.
"Nothing comes of Nothing!", cried King Lear.
Speaking of King Lear, he is invoked in the book as well as Montagigne, the Kabbalah, Vermeer's paintings, and Renaissance architectural perspectives.

In short, the zero and its manipulation is what made possible the rise of the West as the engine of modernity. The idea of Nothing, numerically represented as zero (invented to keep Infinitity company), is (or was) of course the sine qua non of the East. But in the West it was and still is, by and large a metaphysical albatross around the neck of many a thinker, despite their ability to manipulate it like nobody before them. How ironic that the zero is what made the possibility of total annihilation possible in our time.

This book, with its erudition-lite, allows you to think about how the Vedic origin of the zero might relate to the idea put forth by Sloterdyjk in his "Critique of Cynical Reason". Namely, that for the West, the nuclear missile in its silo is the Buddha -- in its infinite stillness, silence, acceptance of the inevitable, and self-negation. The bomb is the zero manifest awaiting its ecstasy to come on ground zero.
There are other books out there on the theme of zero but I think this one is most philosophically thought-provoking.
Gaxaisvem
average insight
Gaxaisvem
average insight