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Murther and Walking Spirits epub download

by Robertson Davies


Murther & Walking Spirits. ROBERTSON DAVIES (1913–1995) was born and raised in Ontario, and was educated at a variety of schools, including Upper Canada College, Queen’s University, and Balliol College, Oxford

Murther & Walking Spirits. ROBERTSON DAVIES (1913–1995) was born and raised in Ontario, and was educated at a variety of schools, including Upper Canada College, Queen’s University, and Balliol College, Oxford. He had three successive careers: as an actor with the Old Vic Company in England; as publisher of the Peterborough Examiner; and as university professor and first Master of Massey College at the University of Toronto, from which he retired in 1981 with the title of Master Emeritus.

Murther and Walking Spirits" grabbed me from the beginning. After being bludgeoned by his wife's lover, the narrator in ghostly form wanders through time and space visiting 6-generations of his ancestors. The book is chockfull of historical insights, and interesting trivia. information about pots de chambre, jordans, and "welsh hats. While the trivia changes with each generation, the themes remain constant.

Murther and Walking Spirits, first published by McClelland and Stewart in 1991, is a novel by Canadian novelist Robertson Davies. Murther and Walking Spirits is, in a way, another ghost story, a genre Davies visited in his short story collection High Spirits (1982).

Murther and Walking Spirits book. Anthony Burgess listed Robertson Davies' The Rebel Angels among the 99 best novels of our time and declared that Davies himself is "without doubt Nobel Prize material". With Murther & Walking Spirits Davies reconfirms his stature as an irresistibly erudite practitioner of the art of fiction.

Murther & Walking Spirits Robertson Davies Penguin Books Ltd 9780241952665 Дэвис. Мёртер и блуждающие духи : & was never so amazed in my life as when the Sniffer drew his concealed weapon from. Автор: Robertson Davies Название: Murther & Walking Spirits (Дэвис.

Davies's depiction of how the descendants of Samuel Gilmartin came to emigrate to British North America .

Davies's depiction of how the descendants of Samuel Gilmartin came to emigrate to British North America convincingly blends gritty humor-including a hilarious Welsh cursing contest- -with sympathetic portrayals of his characters.

Anthony Burgess listed Davies' The Rebel Angels among the 99 best novels of our time and declared that Davies himself is "without doubt Nobel Prize material". In this unusual novel, Davies' protagonist is murdered in the first sentence of the book, but he lingers as a ghost to view the exploits of his ancestors, from the American Revolution to the present.

Murther & walking spirits. Authors: Davies, Robertson. It is as a writer of fiction that Robertson Davies achieved international recognition, with such books as The Salterton Trilogy (Tempest-Tost, Leaven of Malice and A Mixture of Frailties); The Deptford Trilogy (Fifth Business, The Manticore and World of Wonders); The Cornish Trilogy (The Rebel Angels, What's Bred in the Bone, shortlisted for the 1986 Booker Prize, and The Lyre of Orpheus); Murther & Walking Spirits, and The Cunning Man. Robertson Davies died in 1995. Country of Publication.

Robertson Davies (1913–1995) was born and raised in Ontario, and was educated at a variety of schools, including Upper Canada College, Queen’s University, and Balliol College, Oxford.

Murther and Walking Spirits epub download

ISBN13: 978-1856953504

ISBN: 1856953505

Author: Robertson Davies

Category: Other

Subcategory: Humanities

Language: English

Publisher: ISIS Large Print Books (February 1993)

Pages: 452 pages

ePUB size: 1527 kb

FB2 size: 1684 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 368

Other Formats: rtf txt mbr azw

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Invissibale
He's a skilled writer. The book club agreed that we liked the start and the end, but we slogged through the middle section (especially about Welsh economics 2 centuries ago.)

Book arrived very promptly and in better condition than I expected
Invissibale
He's a skilled writer. The book club agreed that we liked the start and the end, but we slogged through the middle section (especially about Welsh economics 2 centuries ago.)

Book arrived very promptly and in better condition than I expected
Runehammer
I am told that Robertson Davies has written good books. This book is not one of them and now I, for one, will probably never find out about the others. At times the book rises to mildly entertaining competence, especially in the first 30 pages or so.

This book should be banned unless the middle section that attempts to emulate James Joyce is excised. The chapter is a travesty. It is painful to read, both because of the miserable stylistic failures which only serve to illuminate Davies' inadequacies as a writer; and out of sympathy for the author who seems like a nice guy and should not have such a literary legacy to besmirch his name. It is astonishing that a published author could write such miserable tripe and allow it to be included in his work, it is troubling that an editor and publisher would do him the disservice of allowing it to go forth and afflict mass readership. The book might have warranted two whole stars were it not the context for such a miserable debacle.

The end of the book constitutes an horrific attempt at evoking no less a personage than Goethe- a triumph of chutzpah that surpasses even the iniquity of the Joycean chapter. One leaves this book with a feeling that one must do literary penance for having read it, or perhaps undertake a sort of ritual cleansing.
Runehammer
I am told that Robertson Davies has written good books. This book is not one of them and now I, for one, will probably never find out about the others. At times the book rises to mildly entertaining competence, especially in the first 30 pages or so.

This book should be banned unless the middle section that attempts to emulate James Joyce is excised. The chapter is a travesty. It is painful to read, both because of the miserable stylistic failures which only serve to illuminate Davies' inadequacies as a writer; and out of sympathy for the author who seems like a nice guy and should not have such a literary legacy to besmirch his name. It is astonishing that a published author could write such miserable tripe and allow it to be included in his work, it is troubling that an editor and publisher would do him the disservice of allowing it to go forth and afflict mass readership. The book might have warranted two whole stars were it not the context for such a miserable debacle.

The end of the book constitutes an horrific attempt at evoking no less a personage than Goethe- a triumph of chutzpah that surpasses even the iniquity of the Joycean chapter. One leaves this book with a feeling that one must do literary penance for having read it, or perhaps undertake a sort of ritual cleansing.
bass
An interesting book, I really enjoyed it. Who else but R. Davies could kill off his main character in the first sentence, and then chronicle the experiences of the disembodied ghost for over three and a half hundred pages... and yet keep it increasingly interesting? He does it. Incidentally, Davies believed that physical death would not spell the annihilation of the animating spirit of man (a belief to which I am in full agreement). He once speculated about his own afterlife by saying: "I haven't any notion of what I might be or whether I'll be capable of recognizing what I've been, or perhaps even what I am, but I expect that I shall be something." Murther is a really interesting fictional account of what that "something" might be like.
The moment that Connor Gilmartin is struck dead in his own bedroom by his wife's lover, he finds that he is still alive! Perhaps even more alive than he has ever been; he is in a state that the opening chapter calls "roughly translated". He's a ghost; a walking spirit. This new state is fraught with all manner of possibilities and limitations. For one thing, his powers of awareness and observation are heightened, but he is unable to communicate with any of the living, no matter how he jumps up and down or shouts in their ear. And for that typically Robertsonian twist, the great author borrows an idea from the Bhagavad Gita which states that after death one maintains a connection with what one was thinking about at the moment of death. (It behoved a man to be concerned with what he was thinking of as he died)! So... what was Connor Gilmartin thinking of at that moment? Well, he was processing the fact that he had just caught his wife involved with a man (a co-worker) whom he particularly despised for many reasons, and secondly, he was thinking of a particular work-related problem concerning an upcoming Film Festival in Toronto to which this man (his murderer) was vying with him for position as lead writer. Now Connor is dead, aware of his wife's duplicity in covering up the murder but unable to vindicate himself in any way, and furthermore he is bound inextricably to his own murderer who attends the Film Festval as lead writer in his place. In a surreal twist, at the Film Festival, what Connor views on the screen is not what the others are seeing, but rather it is a documentary of his own ancestry... (one's life flashes before one's eyes??) He is seeing something wholly personal. After the festival he is instantly translated back to see how his wife is winding up her affairs... he sees that she has actually found a way to profit from his untimely demise. This story was great right to the end... with the disclaimer that in my opinion it is important to remember it as a fanciful rather than a literal view of what happens after your last breath. He raises a lot of interesting things to think about though. Not the best example of Davies' work, but still worthy of four and a half stars to the best Canadian writer ever.
bass
An interesting book, I really enjoyed it. Who else but R. Davies could kill off his main character in the first sentence, and then chronicle the experiences of the disembodied ghost for over three and a half hundred pages... and yet keep it increasingly interesting? He does it. Incidentally, Davies believed that physical death would not spell the annihilation of the animating spirit of man (a belief to which I am in full agreement). He once speculated about his own afterlife by saying: "I haven't any notion of what I might be or whether I'll be capable of recognizing what I've been, or perhaps even what I am, but I expect that I shall be something." Murther is a really interesting fictional account of what that "something" might be like.
The moment that Connor Gilmartin is struck dead in his own bedroom by his wife's lover, he finds that he is still alive! Perhaps even more alive than he has ever been; he is in a state that the opening chapter calls "roughly translated". He's a ghost; a walking spirit. This new state is fraught with all manner of possibilities and limitations. For one thing, his powers of awareness and observation are heightened, but he is unable to communicate with any of the living, no matter how he jumps up and down or shouts in their ear. And for that typically Robertsonian twist, the great author borrows an idea from the Bhagavad Gita which states that after death one maintains a connection with what one was thinking about at the moment of death. (It behoved a man to be concerned with what he was thinking of as he died)! So... what was Connor Gilmartin thinking of at that moment? Well, he was processing the fact that he had just caught his wife involved with a man (a co-worker) whom he particularly despised for many reasons, and secondly, he was thinking of a particular work-related problem concerning an upcoming Film Festival in Toronto to which this man (his murderer) was vying with him for position as lead writer. Now Connor is dead, aware of his wife's duplicity in covering up the murder but unable to vindicate himself in any way, and furthermore he is bound inextricably to his own murderer who attends the Film Festval as lead writer in his place. In a surreal twist, at the Film Festival, what Connor views on the screen is not what the others are seeing, but rather it is a documentary of his own ancestry... (one's life flashes before one's eyes??) He is seeing something wholly personal. After the festival he is instantly translated back to see how his wife is winding up her affairs... he sees that she has actually found a way to profit from his untimely demise. This story was great right to the end... with the disclaimer that in my opinion it is important to remember it as a fanciful rather than a literal view of what happens after your last breath. He raises a lot of interesting things to think about though. Not the best example of Davies' work, but still worthy of four and a half stars to the best Canadian writer ever.
Daigrel
Let me tell you, Davies wrote one helluva book here, and I absolutely adore Murther and Walking Spirits. It's very rooted in Eastern philosophy and is in many ways opposed to the western views on death. Westerners tend to view death as a failure or an embarassment and not as the natural course of things, like the Easterners do. This novel parodies the insincere, uncomprehending views on death that many of us hold. Davies also brings things into perspective on a larger scale by tracing Gilmartin's (the dead protagonist) ancestors, from his great-great-great grandparents up to his parents through a film festival of sorts, helping his spirit to realize what death, life, and the 'hero-struggle' really means in the long run, or the never-ending now. If anyone found this book underwhelming, it may be because Davies did not explain the character's development for the reader in clear terms, assuming perhaps they were bright enough to catch it on their own. It takes more than a little bit of thinking to get this book, and I've been doing a lot of that since I finished reading it. Davies has taught me a lot, and I highly recommend his fictions to any and everyone.
Daigrel
Let me tell you, Davies wrote one helluva book here, and I absolutely adore Murther and Walking Spirits. It's very rooted in Eastern philosophy and is in many ways opposed to the western views on death. Westerners tend to view death as a failure or an embarassment and not as the natural course of things, like the Easterners do. This novel parodies the insincere, uncomprehending views on death that many of us hold. Davies also brings things into perspective on a larger scale by tracing Gilmartin's (the dead protagonist) ancestors, from his great-great-great grandparents up to his parents through a film festival of sorts, helping his spirit to realize what death, life, and the 'hero-struggle' really means in the long run, or the never-ending now. If anyone found this book underwhelming, it may be because Davies did not explain the character's development for the reader in clear terms, assuming perhaps they were bright enough to catch it on their own. It takes more than a little bit of thinking to get this book, and I've been doing a lot of that since I finished reading it. Davies has taught me a lot, and I highly recommend his fictions to any and everyone.
Sermak Light
This is my first Robertson Davies' novel; certainly not my last.

"Murther and Walking Spirits" grabbed me from the beginning. After being bludgeoned
by his wife's lover, the narrator in ghostly form wanders through time and space visiting
6-generations of his ancestors. The book is chockfull of historical insights, and interesting
trivia. E.g., information about pots de chambre, jordans, and "welsh hats." While the
trivia changes with each generation, the themes remain constant.

"[A]nything pursued beyond a reasonable point, turns into its opposite," and the better path to
happiness is accepting life on it's own terms. The book is lively, well-written, wry, and consoled
this reader with the thought that his personal issues have been shared by mankind through the
ages.
Sermak Light
This is my first Robertson Davies' novel; certainly not my last.

"Murther and Walking Spirits" grabbed me from the beginning. After being bludgeoned
by his wife's lover, the narrator in ghostly form wanders through time and space visiting
6-generations of his ancestors. The book is chockfull of historical insights, and interesting
trivia. E.g., information about pots de chambre, jordans, and "welsh hats." While the
trivia changes with each generation, the themes remain constant.

"[A]nything pursued beyond a reasonable point, turns into its opposite," and the better path to
happiness is accepting life on it's own terms. The book is lively, well-written, wry, and consoled
this reader with the thought that his personal issues have been shared by mankind through the
ages.