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Analysis of Chinese Characters (Dover Language Guides) epub download

by G. D. Wilder,J. H. Ingram


Paperback: 384 pages I'm actually an intermediate Japanese student but bought Dover's Chinese character analysis to help me memorize kanji.

Paperback: 384 pages. ISBN-13: 978-0486230450. I'm actually an intermediate Japanese student but bought Dover's Chinese character analysis to help me memorize kanji. A story or a historical "hook" makes it easier to remember kanji rather than writing it dozens of times. So far this book's helped me make a few subtle connections between seemingly unrelated kanji.

The metadata below describe the original scanning. Caption title: Analysis of Chinese characters from Baller's Mandarin primer. Based mainly on Dr. L. Wieger's Etymological lessons and the Shuo wen.

Analysis of Chinese Characters book. 0486230457 (ISBN13: 9780486230450).

In similar vein, 'Analysis of Chinese Characters', by . Ingram, published by Dover Publications, complements the work of Wieger, listing one thousand and two characters, together with derivations and modern alternatives. Chang Hsuan's work on 'The Etymologies of 3000 Chinese Characters in Common Usage', published by Hong Kong University Press, also shows the derivations of many Chinese characters, from the 'small seal' script.

1,000 most important characters are analyzed according to primitives, phonetics, and historical development.

We are like Rottentomatoes or Metacritic for books. We also do book giveaways. 1,000 most important characters are analyzed according to primitives, phonetics, and historical development.

Analysis of Chinese Characters. By: G. D. Wilder, J. H. Ingram. Chinese characters were not formed arbitrarily, despite (to a Western eye) their overall similarity yet bewildering multiplicity in detail. Over several thousands of years, early religious writers, court officials, scholars, poets, and eventually lexicographers created a body of material that shows a remarkable internal system. A few characters were originally pictographic; a few were arbitrary; but more were the result of combining phonetic elements with semantic features.

Analysis of Chinese CharactersPaperback – 5 October 2011. I am just starting lo learn Chinese at home and would not have even attempted it without the support of several e-mail friends from China. by George Durand Wilder(Author), J. Ingram(Author).

com: ANALYSIS OF CHINESE CHARACTERS. College of Chinese Studies, 1934, xi, 364 pages. This copy is bound in simple contemporary wraps. It is housed in a contemporary (of the period) blue cloth portfolio with ivory clasps. A former owner's name and "chop" are neatly stamped on the lower right corner of the title page. Overall, a very good copy.

George Durand Wilder, J. Far and away the most useful analysis of characters for both beginning and intermediate students.

Chinese characters were not formed arbitrarily, despite (to a Western eye) their overall similarity yet bewildering multiplicity in detail. Over several thousands of years, early religious writers, court officials, scholars, poets, and eventually lexicographers created a body of material that shows a remarkable internal system. A few characters were originally pictographic; a few were arbitrary; but more were the result of combining phonetic elements with semantic features.This situation is not simply a historical curiosity, however; it offers a potentially great help to the student who is studying Chinese or Japanese characters, if he is aware of the patterns within the corpus of characters. In China and Japan, for hundreds of years, these derivational principles have been used as a teaching and mnemonic device; unfortunately, they have been greatly neglected in Western teaching.This volume analyzes thoroughly, yet in simple language, some 1,000 Sino-Japanese characters, beginning with simple words like "I," "you," "he," and the plural particle for pronouns, and works through a high-frequency vocabulary of characters. For each character it offers a printed form and, where such exists, a seal form; a transcription of the pronunciation into modern Mandarin, including tonal indications; and a full English translation. A body of text then explains the historical origin of the character, its semantic content, its components, including its radical in the traditional system. All this information is based on both the older compilations like the Shuo Wen and such modern studies as Wieger's monumental work.This is far and away the most useful analysis of characters for the beginner or intermediate student. There is nothing else quite like it on the market. Full, clearly analyzed, faithful, it will make the learning of characters far easier and far more pleasant than brute memory. It should be owned by every student and teacher of Chinese or Japanese.

Analysis of Chinese Characters (Dover Language Guides) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0486230450

ISBN: 0486230457

Author: G. D. Wilder,J. H. Ingram

Category: Other

Subcategory: Humanities

Language: English

Publisher: Dover Publications; 2nd Revised ed. edition (November 2, 2011)

Pages: 384 pages

ePUB size: 1359 kb

FB2 size: 1647 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 836

Other Formats: mbr lrf azw docx

Related to Analysis of Chinese Characters (Dover Language Guides) ePub books

Cointrius
I am just starting lo learn Chinese at home and would not have even attempted it without the support of several e-mail friends from China. After reading almost everyone's "listomania" and reviews of the many books on learning Chinese, I chose this to add to my library. (Thanks to all you Amazon reviewers!)
I am familiar with Eastern thought and some of the history of China as a result of my 30+ years studying Taoism and, more recently, Buddhhism. The book brought facts together for me in the history of the language and why the characters changed form. I found this information fascinating. This resource answered many of the questions I had before tackling the language itself.
So much help when explaining how to see the difference between the radical and phonetic! It also has a handy index in the back to find an alphabetical list in Western language converted to the Chinese character.. One of the unusual aspects of the book is the index of characters broken down in the number of strokes a character uses. However, there is no pronounciation guide. This is a major drawvback for the hands-on learner.
I know I will be using this text as a staple of my lessons. However, I would not start with this text. As noted above, I recommend "Learn to Write Chinese Characters" by Johan Bjorksten as a "primer." (I am reminded of the tablet and pencil I used in first grade to practice my alphabet when attempting one character a day.)
Some days I feel like I am Bart Simson writing on the blackboard after school, but I faithfully follow the instruction to learn each stroke and practice each character at least one hundred times before moving on.
This language is an art, and I have yet to find the right pen and inks, as well as the "tablet" paper needed to "keep within the lines." Would someone please make this type of "tablet" available to the first year student? If you know a source, please e-mail me!
I do recommend this as an excellent reference book and I will find it increasingly useful as mylearning continues. Great for the reference library!
Cointrius
I am just starting lo learn Chinese at home and would not have even attempted it without the support of several e-mail friends from China. After reading almost everyone's "listomania" and reviews of the many books on learning Chinese, I chose this to add to my library. (Thanks to all you Amazon reviewers!)
I am familiar with Eastern thought and some of the history of China as a result of my 30+ years studying Taoism and, more recently, Buddhhism. The book brought facts together for me in the history of the language and why the characters changed form. I found this information fascinating. This resource answered many of the questions I had before tackling the language itself.
So much help when explaining how to see the difference between the radical and phonetic! It also has a handy index in the back to find an alphabetical list in Western language converted to the Chinese character.. One of the unusual aspects of the book is the index of characters broken down in the number of strokes a character uses. However, there is no pronounciation guide. This is a major drawvback for the hands-on learner.
I know I will be using this text as a staple of my lessons. However, I would not start with this text. As noted above, I recommend "Learn to Write Chinese Characters" by Johan Bjorksten as a "primer." (I am reminded of the tablet and pencil I used in first grade to practice my alphabet when attempting one character a day.)
Some days I feel like I am Bart Simson writing on the blackboard after school, but I faithfully follow the instruction to learn each stroke and practice each character at least one hundred times before moving on.
This language is an art, and I have yet to find the right pen and inks, as well as the "tablet" paper needed to "keep within the lines." Would someone please make this type of "tablet" available to the first year student? If you know a source, please e-mail me!
I do recommend this as an excellent reference book and I will find it increasingly useful as mylearning continues. Great for the reference library!
Owomed
This book is criticized by some high brow scholars because it has some etymological errors, however the information it provides for every character (some 1400 in this book) is very helpful for learning them, it also gives for most of them the old seal form that is highly informative. To learn above 4000+ is a interesting, fascinating but difficult task, and this book is a great help for building memory holds. It uses a old style romanization but is easy to get hold of it in some minutes, it has a very useful alphabetic index and a stroke index. I would recommend it as a extra help for those using the Heising method.
Owomed
This book is criticized by some high brow scholars because it has some etymological errors, however the information it provides for every character (some 1400 in this book) is very helpful for learning them, it also gives for most of them the old seal form that is highly informative. To learn above 4000+ is a interesting, fascinating but difficult task, and this book is a great help for building memory holds. It uses a old style romanization but is easy to get hold of it in some minutes, it has a very useful alphabetic index and a stroke index. I would recommend it as a extra help for those using the Heising method.
Marirne
This short book will help you to understand that chinese writing is not as mysterious as it seems at first. Each complex character is built from simpler ideograms, and the arrangement tells the story. A nice touch is that all chinese characters, by a calligrapher, are printed in bright red (similar to the seal red) against the black text. The bichrome printing is refreshing. Of course, not enough to learn chinese, but enough to be tempted to.
Marirne
This short book will help you to understand that chinese writing is not as mysterious as it seems at first. Each complex character is built from simpler ideograms, and the arrangement tells the story. A nice touch is that all chinese characters, by a calligrapher, are printed in bright red (similar to the seal red) against the black text. The bichrome printing is refreshing. Of course, not enough to learn chinese, but enough to be tempted to.
Capella
OK for reference. A bit old but still useful in some ways.
Capella
OK for reference. A bit old but still useful in some ways.
Crazy
I'm actually an intermediate Japanese student but bought Dover's Chinese character analysis to help me memorize kanji. A story or a historical "hook" makes it easier to remember kanji rather than writing it dozens of times. So far this book's helped me make a few subtle connections between seemingly unrelated kanji. Since JP kanji has two readings (Sino "on" + native "kun") it helps to have the original Chinese readings. Most of book's too esoteric to have practical application though.
Crazy
I'm actually an intermediate Japanese student but bought Dover's Chinese character analysis to help me memorize kanji. A story or a historical "hook" makes it easier to remember kanji rather than writing it dozens of times. So far this book's helped me make a few subtle connections between seemingly unrelated kanji. Since JP kanji has two readings (Sino "on" + native "kun") it helps to have the original Chinese readings. Most of book's too esoteric to have practical application though.
Gholbirius
This is an interesting book about the history of some 1002 characters. Each character is dissected into its radical and phonetic parts with etymology provided for each part and the combined whole. Originally published in 1922 and 1934 in China, so the characters are "traditional" and the phonetic spelling is unfortunately using the outdated Wade-Giles system (Beijing would be spelled "Peiching"). This book is better for browsing than for reference -- I've found it frustrating to try and look up words in it with only the alphabetical (Wade-Giles) and pure stroke order (not grouped by radical) indexes. It is also lacking any sort of English to Chinese index.
A major shortcoming of this book is that it doesn't really tell you how the characters are used. There are no examples and it ignores completely that Chinese characters usually don't stand alone but are used in combinations to form words.
A better all-around book that gives a short summary of the origin of each character plus can really be used for reference (and shows how character are combined to form words) is Rick Harbaugh's "Chinese Characters: A Genealogy and Dictionary".
Gholbirius
This is an interesting book about the history of some 1002 characters. Each character is dissected into its radical and phonetic parts with etymology provided for each part and the combined whole. Originally published in 1922 and 1934 in China, so the characters are "traditional" and the phonetic spelling is unfortunately using the outdated Wade-Giles system (Beijing would be spelled "Peiching"). This book is better for browsing than for reference -- I've found it frustrating to try and look up words in it with only the alphabetical (Wade-Giles) and pure stroke order (not grouped by radical) indexes. It is also lacking any sort of English to Chinese index.
A major shortcoming of this book is that it doesn't really tell you how the characters are used. There are no examples and it ignores completely that Chinese characters usually don't stand alone but are used in combinations to form words.
A better all-around book that gives a short summary of the origin of each character plus can really be used for reference (and shows how character are combined to form words) is Rick Harbaugh's "Chinese Characters: A Genealogy and Dictionary".
Dogrel
I have the 1974 printing, which is an unabridged reprinting of the 1934 second edition. Since the number of pages is the same as the current edition, I assume there are no changes.
The analysis is of traditional, rather than simplified characters, and the romanization system used is not Pinyin, but the older Wade-Giles. This makes the book of somewhat limited use to those trying to understand Chinese characters as they are written in the PRC, but it is still a very interesting work. It meets a need similar to that of Michael Rowley's Kanji Pict-O-Graphix, but for Chinese, rather than Japanese. (Rowley's book, however, is more accessable.)
Dogrel
I have the 1974 printing, which is an unabridged reprinting of the 1934 second edition. Since the number of pages is the same as the current edition, I assume there are no changes.
The analysis is of traditional, rather than simplified characters, and the romanization system used is not Pinyin, but the older Wade-Giles. This makes the book of somewhat limited use to those trying to understand Chinese characters as they are written in the PRC, but it is still a very interesting work. It meets a need similar to that of Michael Rowley's Kanji Pict-O-Graphix, but for Chinese, rather than Japanese. (Rowley's book, however, is more accessable.)