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The Parable of the Tribes: The Problem of Power in Social Evolution, Second Edition epub download

by Andrew Bard Schmookler


Andrew Bard Schmookler's book, The Parable of the Tribes, takes a long hard look at. .In any case, the book shows how serious theorizing can be put to good use in dealing with actual "real world" problems in our complex times

Andrew Bard Schmookler's book, The Parable of the Tribes, takes a long hard look at the problem of power and exploitation. Schmookler believed that wild humans enjoyed lives of wholeness and freedom that modern folks can barely imagine. In the good old days, human societies were stable, because our development was guided by genetic evolution, a slow-moving process. Nature provided our sustenance, and we took only what we needed. In any case, the book shows how serious theorizing can be put to good use in dealing with actual "real world" problems in our complex times.

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Andrew Bard Schmookler’s book, The Parable of the Tribes, takes a long hard look at the . Schmookler does not recommend solving our problems by violent revolution, because revolutions have a reliable habit of replacing old tyrants with new ones - a bloody waste of energy

Andrew Bard Schmookler’s book, The Parable of the Tribes, takes a long hard look at the problem of power and exploitation. Schmookler does not recommend solving our problems by violent revolution, because revolutions have a reliable habit of replacing old tyrants with new ones - a bloody waste of energy. We’re so far from home that simple strategies are not enough. Utopia is not just a revolution away.

Mobile version (beta). The parable of the tribes: the problem of power in social evolution. Andrew Bard Schmookler. Download (epub, 907 Kb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

by Andrew Bard Schmookler. This is a new view of the role of power in social evolution

by Andrew Bard Schmookler. This is a new view of the role of power in social evolution. It shows how, as human societies evolved, intersocietal conflicts necessarily developed, and how humanity can choose peace over wa. Goes far beyond our common folk knowledge about power.

If I were to list the top ten books of the century, this book would be one of them. On July 23, 2016, we discontinued our forums. We ask our members to please join us in our new community site, The Hartmann Report

If I were to list the top ten books of the century, this book would be one of them. Why? Because it dares to answer a question that few others have attempted, a question that is fundamental and vital to our future. We ask our members to please join us in our new community site, The Hartmann Report. 1 post, 0 new. Topic locked.

Andrew Bard Schmookler. State University of New York Press, 1995 - 413 sayfa. I found this was a difficult book to read - partially due to the complexity of the subject matter but equally due to the writing style. The basic argument is that civilization evolves by selecting. Tam incelemeyi okuyun. One The Parable of the Tribes. This is tough reading, in part because the publisher’s choice of paper and font are not the best.

Andrew Bard Schmookler, The Parable of the Tribes: The Problem of Power in Social Evolution, University of.Andrew Bard Schmookler, Out of Weakness: Healing the Wounds That Drive Us to War, Bantam Books 1988

Andrew Bard Schmookler, The Parable of the Tribes: The Problem of Power in Social Evolution, University of California Press 1984, ISBN 978-0520048744. Andrew Bard Schmookler, Out of Weakness: Healing the Wounds That Drive Us to War, Bantam Books 1988, ISBN 978-0553053296. Andrew Bard Schmookler, The Illusion of Choice: How the Market Economy Shapes Our Destiny, State University of New York Press 1993, ISBN 978-0791412657.

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This is a new view of the role of power in social evolution. It shows how, as human societies evolved, intersocietal conflicts necessarily developed, and how humanity can choose peace over war.

The Parable of the Tribes: The Problem of Power in Social Evolution, Second Edition epub download

ISBN13: 978-0791424209

ISBN: 0791424200

Author: Andrew Bard Schmookler

Category: Other

Subcategory: Humanities

Language: English

Publisher: SUNY Press; 2 edition (December 23, 1994)

Pages: 426 pages

ePUB size: 1763 kb

FB2 size: 1591 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 863

Other Formats: doc txt rtf azw

Related to The Parable of the Tribes: The Problem of Power in Social Evolution, Second Edition ePub books

Zehaffy
Everyone should read this book. It will change the way you view the world. I have a library in excess of 1000 volumes. This is one of the twenty most important I have read in my 70+ years
Zehaffy
Everyone should read this book. It will change the way you view the world. I have a library in excess of 1000 volumes. This is one of the twenty most important I have read in my 70+ years
Jugore
This long view look at the past with grave implications for the future is both thorough and thoughtful. This book's conclusions are hard to dismiss. They should challenge us today, even though the book was written a while back.
Jugore
This long view look at the past with grave implications for the future is both thorough and thoughtful. This book's conclusions are hard to dismiss. They should challenge us today, even though the book was written a while back.
Winail
Schmookler is always provocative in making you think outside box in regard to the condition of human beings. He actually makes a determined effort to understand how evolutionary processes affect us which is rare amongst our species. I would warmly recommend reading this book as I would most of his other books.
Winail
Schmookler is always provocative in making you think outside box in regard to the condition of human beings. He actually makes a determined effort to understand how evolutionary processes affect us which is rare amongst our species. I would warmly recommend reading this book as I would most of his other books.
Makaitist
I will keep this very short since this is a something that truly speaks for itself. In the past two years I have read around 50 books pertaining to a variety of topics. This book, The Parable of the Tribes, was by far the most interesting book I think I may have ever read. It brings to light so many answers to questions that any normal inquisitive human being has pondered over once or twice in his or her life. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in society, civilization, evolution, economics, philosophy, phychology, and sociology. I am eagerly looking forward to reading the two other books he wrote after this one.
Makaitist
I will keep this very short since this is a something that truly speaks for itself. In the past two years I have read around 50 books pertaining to a variety of topics. This book, The Parable of the Tribes, was by far the most interesting book I think I may have ever read. It brings to light so many answers to questions that any normal inquisitive human being has pondered over once or twice in his or her life. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in society, civilization, evolution, economics, philosophy, phychology, and sociology. I am eagerly looking forward to reading the two other books he wrote after this one.
Oghmaghma
Once upon a time, I was on an internet mailing list that jabbered about "saving the world." Industrial civilization was hammering the planet. What should we do? Some advocated dropping out and creating self-sufficient eco-villages. Others thought that industrial civilization had to be smashed first, because nothing would be safe until then. A philosopher from Florida persistently asked: "How can we expect to stop them by emulating those that have been destroyed?" His question was not easy to dismiss, and it made the pacifists squirm.

Andrew Bard Schmookler's book, The Parable of the Tribes, takes a long hard look at the problem of power and exploitation. Schmookler believed that wild humans enjoyed lives of wholeness and freedom that modern folks can barely imagine. In the good old days, human societies were stable, because our development was guided by genetic evolution, a slow-moving process. Nature provided our sustenance, and we took only what we needed. We were not in control of the world, nature was. Humans were just one member of the great family, and nothing more.

Slowly, very slowly, over the course of many generations, cultures began to emerge. Gradually, cultures passed more and more knowledge from one generation to the next, which improved our skills at exploiting nature. Eventually, our growing cleverness led us to attempt an escape from the control of nature, and its limits -- an impossible goal in the long run, but we tried.

We moved away from the wild buffet, and began producing our own food, in abundant quantities. We cut down forests and replaced wild ecosystems with colonies of domesticated plants and animals. By doing this, we were able to temporarily extract far more energy from nature, and this moved us into the fast lane. The monstrosity that we were creating made us unstable, unpredictable, and dangerous.

Of course, more food always leads to more hungry mouths, and farming societies grew and grew. First, they expanded by swiping the lands of wild humans, and when they ran out of those lands, they had to make a choice. They could either limit their population, or they could conquer other farming societies. Well, the farmers were bloated with overconfidence. If they were powerful enough to escape from the limits of wild nature, then they were certainly powerful enough to swipe the lands of their lazy, stupid, sub-human neighbors. Fetch the war paint, lads!

In the struggle between growing societies, the process selected for power. Aggressive ruthless bullies were the most likely to come out on top. Eventually, this led to hierarchical society and civilization. Most humans were reduced to bondage, and legions of slaves built awesome monuments celebrating the gory glory of notorious bullies. Warfare became a popular pastime. For the first time, domination and control -- power -- was introduced into the world.

"Power" is a keyword in this book. It meant forcing your will against the will of another. Power provided the black magic juju for dancing to the beat of conquest and exploitation. It was a new form of energy on the planet. Wild people had no use for it, because they lived within nature, and all was well. Power was the mother of "civilization," another disgusting profanity.
Schmookler wrote that this struggle between societies was rooted in "anarchy" -- meaning a dangerous, uncontrollable, state of disorder. This confused me at first, because anarchy can also simply mean the absence of government. For almost all of human history, anarchy worked wonderfully well in isolated wild societies that were based on self-control, cooperation, sharing, and freedom. Wild societies were a normal functional component of the natural order; they had no need for rulers. Anarchy is not a four-letter word.

Our school systems teach a "commonsense" version of history that ignores almost everything that preceded civilization. It's a mythical story of progress, in which highly intelligent humans made continuous advancements by deliberate choice, bringing us to the techno-utopia of modern times. Schmookler hates his myth because, in reality, civilization has generally done a poor job of meeting human needs, except for the elites -- and it's been a huge disaster for ecosystems.

Schmookler offered a very different story, which he called the parable of the tribes. He thought that as civilizations grew, they began to bump into each other, leading to conflict. One day, tribe A massacred tribe B and -- shazaam! -- power was introduced into the world, like the rat-infested ship that delivered the Black Death to Europe in 1347. When one society in a region began to utilize power, stability came to an end, replaced by treacherous anarchy. At this point, it became impossible to choose a life of peace. The only way to survive with a bully in the neighborhood was to become a bully too -- only power can stop power.

The bottom line is that Schmookler foresees two possible outcomes for humankind: (1) mutual annihilation or (2) a global civilization that can unify humankind, and put an end to the struggle for power -- a just world order guided by reason and values. To stop the never-ending conflicts between civilizations, the solution is to create the mother of all civilizations. It's a surprising idea in a book that majors in tirelessly criticizing civilization from every conceivable angle.

"How can we expect to stop them by emulating those that have been destroyed?" Who is "them?" Would the mother of all civilizations be emulating Uruk, Babylon, and Timbuktu -- proud civilizations destroyed long ago?

Schmookler does not recommend solving our problems by violent revolution, because revolutions have a reliable habit of replacing old tyrants with new ones -- a bloody waste of energy. We're so far from home that simple strategies are not enough. Utopia is not just a revolution away. Healing will take generations, and the disease will leave permanent scars.

Years ago, before I became politically correct, I used to cite Reese's Law: "The <sphincters> always win." It was so frustrating that the savages with the spears almost never massacred the white dudes with the smallpox, artillery, and machine guns. The beautiful wild folks who lived sustainably, and treated the land with respect and reverence, always got stomped by ecocidal maniacs. Where was the justice? Why did they have to die running?

Well, Schmookler gives us a model that makes our predicament comprehensible, and that's what makes this book important. It delivers pieces missing from the great puzzle. Power just happened, by accident, and once it was born, nothing could stop it. So, humans aren't evil. There's no need to feel guilty about our ancestors' boo-boos. We've inherited problems that have been growing for thousands of years. It feels better to understand this, but it doesn't rinse away the bitter taste of tragedy and injustice.

His solution is a throwaway, because predicaments have no solutions (only problems can be solved). I think that there are many more than two possible outcomes. Mutual annihilation will remain a real risk. A benevolent global civilization is highly dubious on the grounds of human nature alone, but Peak Cheap Energy will render it impossible. Industrial civilization is in the beginning stages of collapse, and we are moving toward a future that is going to be local and muscle-powered. Current patterns of living and thinking will disintegrate. This will open the doors to many new possibilities, one of which is a return to sustainable living. As Schmookler says, "the future remains to be written."

Today's benediction comes from J. C. Smuts: "When I look at history, I am a pessimist... but when I look at prehistory, I am an optimist." Amen!

Richard Adrian Reese
Author of What Is Sustainable
Oghmaghma
Once upon a time, I was on an internet mailing list that jabbered about "saving the world." Industrial civilization was hammering the planet. What should we do? Some advocated dropping out and creating self-sufficient eco-villages. Others thought that industrial civilization had to be smashed first, because nothing would be safe until then. A philosopher from Florida persistently asked: "How can we expect to stop them by emulating those that have been destroyed?" His question was not easy to dismiss, and it made the pacifists squirm.

Andrew Bard Schmookler's book, The Parable of the Tribes, takes a long hard look at the problem of power and exploitation. Schmookler believed that wild humans enjoyed lives of wholeness and freedom that modern folks can barely imagine. In the good old days, human societies were stable, because our development was guided by genetic evolution, a slow-moving process. Nature provided our sustenance, and we took only what we needed. We were not in control of the world, nature was. Humans were just one member of the great family, and nothing more.

Slowly, very slowly, over the course of many generations, cultures began to emerge. Gradually, cultures passed more and more knowledge from one generation to the next, which improved our skills at exploiting nature. Eventually, our growing cleverness led us to attempt an escape from the control of nature, and its limits -- an impossible goal in the long run, but we tried.

We moved away from the wild buffet, and began producing our own food, in abundant quantities. We cut down forests and replaced wild ecosystems with colonies of domesticated plants and animals. By doing this, we were able to temporarily extract far more energy from nature, and this moved us into the fast lane. The monstrosity that we were creating made us unstable, unpredictable, and dangerous.

Of course, more food always leads to more hungry mouths, and farming societies grew and grew. First, they expanded by swiping the lands of wild humans, and when they ran out of those lands, they had to make a choice. They could either limit their population, or they could conquer other farming societies. Well, the farmers were bloated with overconfidence. If they were powerful enough to escape from the limits of wild nature, then they were certainly powerful enough to swipe the lands of their lazy, stupid, sub-human neighbors. Fetch the war paint, lads!

In the struggle between growing societies, the process selected for power. Aggressive ruthless bullies were the most likely to come out on top. Eventually, this led to hierarchical society and civilization. Most humans were reduced to bondage, and legions of slaves built awesome monuments celebrating the gory glory of notorious bullies. Warfare became a popular pastime. For the first time, domination and control -- power -- was introduced into the world.

"Power" is a keyword in this book. It meant forcing your will against the will of another. Power provided the black magic juju for dancing to the beat of conquest and exploitation. It was a new form of energy on the planet. Wild people had no use for it, because they lived within nature, and all was well. Power was the mother of "civilization," another disgusting profanity.
Schmookler wrote that this struggle between societies was rooted in "anarchy" -- meaning a dangerous, uncontrollable, state of disorder. This confused me at first, because anarchy can also simply mean the absence of government. For almost all of human history, anarchy worked wonderfully well in isolated wild societies that were based on self-control, cooperation, sharing, and freedom. Wild societies were a normal functional component of the natural order; they had no need for rulers. Anarchy is not a four-letter word.

Our school systems teach a "commonsense" version of history that ignores almost everything that preceded civilization. It's a mythical story of progress, in which highly intelligent humans made continuous advancements by deliberate choice, bringing us to the techno-utopia of modern times. Schmookler hates his myth because, in reality, civilization has generally done a poor job of meeting human needs, except for the elites -- and it's been a huge disaster for ecosystems.

Schmookler offered a very different story, which he called the parable of the tribes. He thought that as civilizations grew, they began to bump into each other, leading to conflict. One day, tribe A massacred tribe B and -- shazaam! -- power was introduced into the world, like the rat-infested ship that delivered the Black Death to Europe in 1347. When one society in a region began to utilize power, stability came to an end, replaced by treacherous anarchy. At this point, it became impossible to choose a life of peace. The only way to survive with a bully in the neighborhood was to become a bully too -- only power can stop power.

The bottom line is that Schmookler foresees two possible outcomes for humankind: (1) mutual annihilation or (2) a global civilization that can unify humankind, and put an end to the struggle for power -- a just world order guided by reason and values. To stop the never-ending conflicts between civilizations, the solution is to create the mother of all civilizations. It's a surprising idea in a book that majors in tirelessly criticizing civilization from every conceivable angle.

"How can we expect to stop them by emulating those that have been destroyed?" Who is "them?" Would the mother of all civilizations be emulating Uruk, Babylon, and Timbuktu -- proud civilizations destroyed long ago?

Schmookler does not recommend solving our problems by violent revolution, because revolutions have a reliable habit of replacing old tyrants with new ones -- a bloody waste of energy. We're so far from home that simple strategies are not enough. Utopia is not just a revolution away. Healing will take generations, and the disease will leave permanent scars.

Years ago, before I became politically correct, I used to cite Reese's Law: "The <sphincters> always win." It was so frustrating that the savages with the spears almost never massacred the white dudes with the smallpox, artillery, and machine guns. The beautiful wild folks who lived sustainably, and treated the land with respect and reverence, always got stomped by ecocidal maniacs. Where was the justice? Why did they have to die running?

Well, Schmookler gives us a model that makes our predicament comprehensible, and that's what makes this book important. It delivers pieces missing from the great puzzle. Power just happened, by accident, and once it was born, nothing could stop it. So, humans aren't evil. There's no need to feel guilty about our ancestors' boo-boos. We've inherited problems that have been growing for thousands of years. It feels better to understand this, but it doesn't rinse away the bitter taste of tragedy and injustice.

His solution is a throwaway, because predicaments have no solutions (only problems can be solved). I think that there are many more than two possible outcomes. Mutual annihilation will remain a real risk. A benevolent global civilization is highly dubious on the grounds of human nature alone, but Peak Cheap Energy will render it impossible. Industrial civilization is in the beginning stages of collapse, and we are moving toward a future that is going to be local and muscle-powered. Current patterns of living and thinking will disintegrate. This will open the doors to many new possibilities, one of which is a return to sustainable living. As Schmookler says, "the future remains to be written."

Today's benediction comes from J. C. Smuts: "When I look at history, I am a pessimist... but when I look at prehistory, I am an optimist." Amen!

Richard Adrian Reese
Author of What Is Sustainable
Karg
This book proposes a novel systemic hypothesis about human behavior that on its face seemed like a synthetic exercise: that our political systems have evolved according to the systemic rule of "power maximization."

It sets forth a novel conundrum that is anything but synthetic and that proves the author's point in a rather profound way. The conundrum is called the "Parable of the Tribes." Simply stated, the parable exhausts all the possible outcomes in a competition between a number of "non-power maximizers" and a single determined "power maximizer." The result is that in order to survive, the "non-power-maximizer" has no choice but to become a power-maximizer himself; that is to say, he must also adopt "the ways of power" whether he wants to do so or not. And in doing so, the circle of power is continued and the "ways of power" are extended.

According to the author's theory, it is selective biological and environmental pressures that have been responsible for the evolution of our human political systems into power-maximizing forms. However, in a world, where recently, there were two power-maximizers, each with enough nuclear weapons to destroy the world several times over, the dilemma of those facing a determined power-maximizer became more than just an abstract theoretical notion. It became a very real global existential trap indeed, escape from which required equally novel solutions.

As an Analyst for the U.S. Arms Control & Disarmament Agency (ACDA), I am proud to admit that we actually took Professor Smookler's theories literally in search of a way to deal with the very real problem of the threats that USSR nuclear arsenal posed.

Suffice it to say that most of the analysis involved expanded version of the classic "Prisoner's Dilemma" game theoretic schemata, and in particular, the Meta-game tableau, which expanded it, as formulated by Professor Nigel Howard. As well, we used some of the very excellent Game Theory work developed by Professor John Nash, whose life became a popular movie biopic.

The upshot of our analysis was that escapes from both the "Prisoner's dilemma" and the "Parable of the Tribes" could be found provided the "decision surfaces" were expanded to take into account new "meta- possibilities." In some ways, our proposed solutions were similar to the solutions Professor Smookler's oproposed in his subsequent work.

In any case, the book shows how serious theorizing can be put to good use in dealing with actual "real world" problems in our complex times. Since it was published, this has been one of my favorite and most cherished books.

Ten Stars.
Karg
This book proposes a novel systemic hypothesis about human behavior that on its face seemed like a synthetic exercise: that our political systems have evolved according to the systemic rule of "power maximization."

It sets forth a novel conundrum that is anything but synthetic and that proves the author's point in a rather profound way. The conundrum is called the "Parable of the Tribes." Simply stated, the parable exhausts all the possible outcomes in a competition between a number of "non-power maximizers" and a single determined "power maximizer." The result is that in order to survive, the "non-power-maximizer" has no choice but to become a power-maximizer himself; that is to say, he must also adopt "the ways of power" whether he wants to do so or not. And in doing so, the circle of power is continued and the "ways of power" are extended.

According to the author's theory, it is selective biological and environmental pressures that have been responsible for the evolution of our human political systems into power-maximizing forms. However, in a world, where recently, there were two power-maximizers, each with enough nuclear weapons to destroy the world several times over, the dilemma of those facing a determined power-maximizer became more than just an abstract theoretical notion. It became a very real global existential trap indeed, escape from which required equally novel solutions.

As an Analyst for the U.S. Arms Control & Disarmament Agency (ACDA), I am proud to admit that we actually took Professor Smookler's theories literally in search of a way to deal with the very real problem of the threats that USSR nuclear arsenal posed.

Suffice it to say that most of the analysis involved expanded version of the classic "Prisoner's Dilemma" game theoretic schemata, and in particular, the Meta-game tableau, which expanded it, as formulated by Professor Nigel Howard. As well, we used some of the very excellent Game Theory work developed by Professor John Nash, whose life became a popular movie biopic.

The upshot of our analysis was that escapes from both the "Prisoner's dilemma" and the "Parable of the Tribes" could be found provided the "decision surfaces" were expanded to take into account new "meta- possibilities." In some ways, our proposed solutions were similar to the solutions Professor Smookler's oproposed in his subsequent work.

In any case, the book shows how serious theorizing can be put to good use in dealing with actual "real world" problems in our complex times. Since it was published, this has been one of my favorite and most cherished books.

Ten Stars.