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The System of Objects (Latin American and Iberian Studies Series) epub download

by Jean Baudrillard


Jean Baudrillard, James Benedict.

Jean Baudrillard, James Benedict. Published for the first time in English, this is Jean Baudrillard's earliest book, written in 1968, at a time when (as the author would put it later), "The society of the spectacle and its denunciation were still the focal point of semiological, psychoanalytical and sociological arguments". Pressing Freudian and Saussurean categories into the service of a basically Marxist perspective, this book offers a cultural critique of the commodity in consumer society

The System of Objects book.

The System of Objects book. He contrasts modern and traditional functional objects, subjecting home furnishing and interior design to a celebrated semiological analysis. His treatment of nonfunctional or marginal objects focuses on antiques and the psychology of collecting, while the metafunctional category extends to the useless, the aberrant and even the schizofunctional.

The System of Objects is a tour de force of the materialist semiotics of the early Baudrillard, who emerges in retrospect as something of a lightning rod for . Series: Latin American & Iberian studies series.

The System of Objects is a tour de force of the materialist semiotics of the early Baudrillard, who emerges in retrospect as something of a lightning rod for all the live ideas of the day: Bataille’s political economy of expenditure and Mauss’s theory of the gift; Reisman’s lonely crowd and the technological society of Jacques Ellul; the structuralism of Roland. Barthes in The System of Fashion; Henri Lefebvre’s work on the social construction of space; and last, but not least, Guy Debord’s situationist critique of the spectacle.

BYU Student Association for Latin American Studies - SALAS. Harold B. Lee Library. USC Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures. College & University. Charles Redd Center for Western Studies. Fire protection service. BYU Student Association for Latin American Studies - SALAS. Hispanic Studies Journals & Academic Presses.

Required texts The Companion to Latin American Studies. Ed. Philip Swanson Class Reader Course requirements: No more than two absences are allowed during the quarter and the attendance portion of your final grade will be impacted starting with the 3rd absence. For any emergency situations you do need to bring a justification to your TA. Grading for undergraduate students: 1) Attendance 15% 2) A critical evaluation of lecture by Carlos Iván Degregori (3 pages) due Monday April 18th, 2005.

Cambridge Studies in Latin American and Iberian Literature (6). Collections: Show more. The book explores how the same process is repeated in two key moments in the history of the Latin American narrative. Carlos Alonso's study provides a radical re-examination of the novela de la tierra or regional novel, which plays a central part in the development of Latin American fiction in the first half of the twentieth century.

the Latin American school: the ist and the. y. poles of the world system (. both the centre and the periphery). They argue that underdeveloped countries have peculiarities. What unites these two strands is that they. both argue against neoclassical and modernization theory and that. they define underdevelopment as being the outcome of a process.

In his early books, such as The System of Objects, For a. .The book was originally a series of articles in the British newspaper The Guardian and the French newspaper Libération.

In his early books, such as The System of Objects, For a Critique of the Political Economy of the Sign, and The Consumer Society, Baudrillard's main focus is upon consumerism, and how different objects are consumed in different ways. Baudrillard's earlier books were attempts to argue that the first two of these values are not simply associated, but are disrupted by the third and, particularly, the fourth.

The interdisciplinary study is a subfield of area studies, and can be composed of numerous disciplines such as economics, sociology, history, international relations, political science, geography, gender studies, and literature. Latin American studies critically examines the history, culture, international relations, and politics, of Latin America

The System of Objects is a tour de force—a theoretical letter-in-a-bottle tossed into the ocean in 1968, which brilliantly communicates to us all the live ideas of the day.Pressing Freudian and Saussurean categories into the service of a basically Marxist perspective, The System of Objects offers a cultural critique of the commodity in consumer society. Baudrillard classifies the everyday objects of the “new technical order” as functional, nonfunctional and metafunctional. He contrasts “modern” and “traditional” functional objects, subjecting home furnishing and interior design to a celebrated semiological analysis. His treatment of nonfunctional or “marginal” objects focuses on antiques and the psychology of collecting, while the metafunctional category extends to the useless, the aberrant and even the “schizofunctional.” Finally, Baudrillard deals at length with the implications of credit and advertising for the commodification of everyday life.The System of Objects is a tour de force of the materialist semiotics of the early Baudrillard, who emerges in retrospect as something of a lightning rod for all the live ideas of the day: Bataille’s political economy of “expenditure” and Mauss’s theory of the gift; Reisman’s lonely crowd and the “technological society” of Jacques Ellul; the structuralism of Roland Barthes in The System of Fashion; Henri Lefebvre’s work on the social construction of space; and last, but not least, Guy Debord’s situationist critique of the spectacle.

The System of Objects (Latin American and Iberian Studies Series) epub download

ISBN13: 978-1859840689

ISBN: 185984068X

Author: Jean Baudrillard

Category: Other

Subcategory: Humanities

Language: English

Publisher: Verso (August 17, 1996)

Pages: 214 pages

ePUB size: 1790 kb

FB2 size: 1419 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 308

Other Formats: lrf lit mobi doc

Related to The System of Objects (Latin American and Iberian Studies Series) ePub books

Anayalore
Note: A number of 5-star ratings refer to delivery and condition of the book and/or do not indicate whether buyers read or understood the book.
Indeed, it's a challenging read. In my case it was required for a class. The work encapsulates much 1960s thinking and French philosophy/world view. At first one wonders whether the confusion results from an unsuccessful English translation. Then, the sheer number of words employed for the delivery of a single concept serves to frustrate and delay comprehension. Run-on sentences take seemingly contradictory trajectories. There are many noteworthy insights and concepts worth pondering once they have been gleaned. However, the delivery system will stymie seekers for whom time is a precious commodity or who do not enjoy extreme verbosity.
Anayalore
Note: A number of 5-star ratings refer to delivery and condition of the book and/or do not indicate whether buyers read or understood the book.
Indeed, it's a challenging read. In my case it was required for a class. The work encapsulates much 1960s thinking and French philosophy/world view. At first one wonders whether the confusion results from an unsuccessful English translation. Then, the sheer number of words employed for the delivery of a single concept serves to frustrate and delay comprehension. Run-on sentences take seemingly contradictory trajectories. There are many noteworthy insights and concepts worth pondering once they have been gleaned. However, the delivery system will stymie seekers for whom time is a precious commodity or who do not enjoy extreme verbosity.
Lesesshe
This is a rather involved piece of work.
I recommend it.
Lesesshe
This is a rather involved piece of work.
I recommend it.
Manona
The quality is very good! Thanks you so much!
Manona
The quality is very good! Thanks you so much!
Alsalar
Hardly seems to have been written in 1968 (Year of publication) the writing still relevant. I especially
appreciated the essays on Warhol and contemporary art in general, and the interview in which the author clarifies some of his most extreme published statements. (I've only read about half of this book so far)
Alsalar
Hardly seems to have been written in 1968 (Year of publication) the writing still relevant. I especially
appreciated the essays on Warhol and contemporary art in general, and the interview in which the author clarifies some of his most extreme published statements. (I've only read about half of this book so far)
Siralune
Nice book. Worth it.
Siralune
Nice book. Worth it.
Ishnllador
Shipping was timely, product was prefect!

The book was for a class, so it is alright. A bit dated in spots, but a good deeper look at objects in our lives.
Ishnllador
Shipping was timely, product was prefect!

The book was for a class, so it is alright. A bit dated in spots, but a good deeper look at objects in our lives.
Kajikus
In 1968, Jean Baudrillard had spent more than a decade teaching sociology and translating German texts before he found his true vocation: using his vast store of erudition to critique what he saw of a society that could not be adequately accounted for by orthodox production oriented Marxist tenets. Where Marx saw a product built by human needs, he saw that product only in terms of the interaction between worker and capital used to roll that thing off the conveyer belt. Where Baudrillard would see that same thing, he would see not the mechanics of manufacturing that thing but the utility it had and how the consumer would react emotionally and viscerally to possessing it.

The term "consumer" had a special resonance for Baudrillard. Most contemporary theorists used it mostly to designate one who purchases a product and pretty much uses it as the manufacturer intended. Along came Baudrillard to expand the definition to include the "why" and the "how" one consumes the object. What needs does consuming that thing satisfy in the user? What lengths will a user go to horde multiple copies? And most important, what is the interaction between designer and manufacturer to produce a product that will subtly shift the consumer from viewing that product from its traditional orthodox use to an unorthodox use that imparts to the consumer a driving sense to view, use, and ultimately horde it so as to ensure a continuing profit for all concerned in the manufacturing process? In The System of Objects, Baudrillard combined theories from Saussure, Barthes, Bataille, and other counter-culture critics to account for the then burgeoning discipline of consumer science modification.

The world of low-tech objects and commonplace gizmos were to Baudrillard the arena in which Marx's triangle of capital, worker, and process had to give way for a more sophisticated method to determine why consumers buy and use as they do. After all, who looks at mirrors in any way except as a reflecting device? Well, for Baudrillard, a mirror spoke volumes about the social pecking order of its user. The more cumbersome, the more ornate a mirror was, the more its affluent owner prized it. Further, to capture one's image in a mirror was a most ephemeral synchronic affair. The next step was to retain that image for a longer diachronic period. Thus, photo albums (equally ornate and pricey) become the pseudo-mirror. The "System" of the title was Baudrillard's vision of Marx transformed taking objects on a journey that begins in the objective world of calculable functionality and terminating somewhere in the incalculable world of human psychology in which the Yellow Brick Road of consumerism swirls ever outward never reaching completion.
Kajikus
In 1968, Jean Baudrillard had spent more than a decade teaching sociology and translating German texts before he found his true vocation: using his vast store of erudition to critique what he saw of a society that could not be adequately accounted for by orthodox production oriented Marxist tenets. Where Marx saw a product built by human needs, he saw that product only in terms of the interaction between worker and capital used to roll that thing off the conveyer belt. Where Baudrillard would see that same thing, he would see not the mechanics of manufacturing that thing but the utility it had and how the consumer would react emotionally and viscerally to possessing it.

The term "consumer" had a special resonance for Baudrillard. Most contemporary theorists used it mostly to designate one who purchases a product and pretty much uses it as the manufacturer intended. Along came Baudrillard to expand the definition to include the "why" and the "how" one consumes the object. What needs does consuming that thing satisfy in the user? What lengths will a user go to horde multiple copies? And most important, what is the interaction between designer and manufacturer to produce a product that will subtly shift the consumer from viewing that product from its traditional orthodox use to an unorthodox use that imparts to the consumer a driving sense to view, use, and ultimately horde it so as to ensure a continuing profit for all concerned in the manufacturing process? In The System of Objects, Baudrillard combined theories from Saussure, Barthes, Bataille, and other counter-culture critics to account for the then burgeoning discipline of consumer science modification.

The world of low-tech objects and commonplace gizmos were to Baudrillard the arena in which Marx's triangle of capital, worker, and process had to give way for a more sophisticated method to determine why consumers buy and use as they do. After all, who looks at mirrors in any way except as a reflecting device? Well, for Baudrillard, a mirror spoke volumes about the social pecking order of its user. The more cumbersome, the more ornate a mirror was, the more its affluent owner prized it. Further, to capture one's image in a mirror was a most ephemeral synchronic affair. The next step was to retain that image for a longer diachronic period. Thus, photo albums (equally ornate and pricey) become the pseudo-mirror. The "System" of the title was Baudrillard's vision of Marx transformed taking objects on a journey that begins in the objective world of calculable functionality and terminating somewhere in the incalculable world of human psychology in which the Yellow Brick Road of consumerism swirls ever outward never reaching completion.
Some contemporary French philosophy is a fascinating and invigorating mix of psychology, sociology, semiotics and, dare one say it, poetry. In the English speaking world, Marshall McLuhan is probably the philosopher whose style is most similar to this first, 1968, book by the now well known Jean Baudrillard.
What is the book about? In a sense it is about the meaning of low tech everyday objects, and thus it is also about the psycho-sociology of our technology. Take mirrors, for example, which were frankly disappearing as an element of interior decoration when Baudrillard wrote his book. Yet for years, mirrors were an important fixture of well-to-do bourgeois interiors; they were opulent, expensive objects which in Baudrillard's words permitted "...the self-indulgent bourgeois
individual to exercise his privilege --reproduce his own image and revel in his possessions". Family portraits and photographs represent diachronic mirrors of the family, and thus played a similar narcissistic role in decoration. Baudrillard analyses clocks, lighting, glass, seating, antiques and the drive to automate and miniaturize gadgets and tools, and always comes up with provocative, sometimes maddening, insights into modern society and one's place in it --and after all what is philosophy
for but to make you think?
There is a brilliant and probably timeless exploration of the passion of collecting and leads up nicely to what the bulk of the book is devoted to: the study of systems of objects (one of the main chapters is aptly titled "The Socio-Ideological System of Objects and Their Consumption"). What do we yearn to express through technology? What is it it that fascinates us about robots? Why is there such a proliferation of automatism, accessory features, inessential features to the point where
an object's dysfunctions are as important as its functions? Baudrillard acknowledges his debt to some of Lewis Mumford's ideas, and deplores with him that too often we try to solve problems by building a machine (perhaps nowadays we would tend to develop software, or in Baudrillard's terms simulate) and thus not only fall wide of the mark but also reveal clear signs of social ineptitude and paralysis. Fashion, consumption, technology are intertwined themes in modern society, feeding off each other and leading to a world that is at once systematized, fragile and baroque, in the sense that the proliferation of forms seems to be more important than mining for substance. It is interesting to compare some of these insights with a more recent book by another French philosopher, Gilles Lipovetsky, on fashion in modern societies ("The empire of the ephemeral", 1987).
The book ends by looking at the role credit and advertising play in the consumption of systems of objects, and thus completes what the book's jacket indicates is "a cultural critique of the commodity in consumer society". Baudrillard is a humanist critic of technology and consumer society and uses psychoanalytical ideas as weapons to grapple with his subject. The book is by turns, infuriating, keen, stimulating but in the end one feels that, curiously, it lacks a certain depth; it plays with
mirrors and is content with catching the light and obtaining the occasional blinding flash; but sometimes that the criticisms seem a little too one-sided or perhaps I simply prefer more constructive criticism. Still, the book is a tour-de-force, and I feel that the translator, James Benedict, did a fine job with a difficult text.
Some contemporary French philosophy is a fascinating and invigorating mix of psychology, sociology, semiotics and, dare one say it, poetry. In the English speaking world, Marshall McLuhan is probably the philosopher whose style is most similar to this first, 1968, book by the now well known Jean Baudrillard.
What is the book about? In a sense it is about the meaning of low tech everyday objects, and thus it is also about the psycho-sociology of our technology. Take mirrors, for example, which were frankly disappearing as an element of interior decoration when Baudrillard wrote his book. Yet for years, mirrors were an important fixture of well-to-do bourgeois interiors; they were opulent, expensive objects which in Baudrillard's words permitted "...the self-indulgent bourgeois
individual to exercise his privilege --reproduce his own image and revel in his possessions". Family portraits and photographs represent diachronic mirrors of the family, and thus played a similar narcissistic role in decoration. Baudrillard analyses clocks, lighting, glass, seating, antiques and the drive to automate and miniaturize gadgets and tools, and always comes up with provocative, sometimes maddening, insights into modern society and one's place in it --and after all what is philosophy
for but to make you think?
There is a brilliant and probably timeless exploration of the passion of collecting and leads up nicely to what the bulk of the book is devoted to: the study of systems of objects (one of the main chapters is aptly titled "The Socio-Ideological System of Objects and Their Consumption"). What do we yearn to express through technology? What is it it that fascinates us about robots? Why is there such a proliferation of automatism, accessory features, inessential features to the point where
an object's dysfunctions are as important as its functions? Baudrillard acknowledges his debt to some of Lewis Mumford's ideas, and deplores with him that too often we try to solve problems by building a machine (perhaps nowadays we would tend to develop software, or in Baudrillard's terms simulate) and thus not only fall wide of the mark but also reveal clear signs of social ineptitude and paralysis. Fashion, consumption, technology are intertwined themes in modern society, feeding off each other and leading to a world that is at once systematized, fragile and baroque, in the sense that the proliferation of forms seems to be more important than mining for substance. It is interesting to compare some of these insights with a more recent book by another French philosopher, Gilles Lipovetsky, on fashion in modern societies ("The empire of the ephemeral", 1987).
The book ends by looking at the role credit and advertising play in the consumption of systems of objects, and thus completes what the book's jacket indicates is "a cultural critique of the commodity in consumer society". Baudrillard is a humanist critic of technology and consumer society and uses psychoanalytical ideas as weapons to grapple with his subject. The book is by turns, infuriating, keen, stimulating but in the end one feels that, curiously, it lacks a certain depth; it plays with
mirrors and is content with catching the light and obtaining the occasional blinding flash; but sometimes that the criticisms seem a little too one-sided or perhaps I simply prefer more constructive criticism. Still, the book is a tour-de-force, and I feel that the translator, James Benedict, did a fine job with a difficult text.