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Keep the Last Bullet for Yourself epub download

by Thomas Bailey Marquis


Thomas Bailey Marquis (Author). ISBN-13: 978-0917256141. I have been a student of the battle all my life, read every book, seen every movie

Thomas Bailey Marquis (Author). I have been a student of the battle all my life, read every book, seen every movie.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Keep the Last Bullet for Yourself: The True Story of Custer's Last Stand as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Professional historians will probably quibble with Marquis, and certainly the book is not as rich in detail as other historical analyses of the battle, but it still makes for a charming and informative study that was very enjoyable to read.

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Thomas Bailey Marquis (December 19, 1869 – March 22, 1935) was an American self-taught historian .

Thomas Bailey Marquis (December 19, 1869 – March 22, 1935) was an American self-taught historian and ethnographer who wrote about the Plains Indians and other subjects of the American frontier. He had a special interest in the destruction of George Armstrong Custer's battalion at the Battle of the Little Bighorn, which became his lifelong obsession. The latter was not published during Marquis' life; much of his work did not appear in print until the 1970s.

Marquis, Thomas Bailey. A fine copy in a fine and unclipped dustjacket. ISBN 10: 0846701561, ISBN 13: 9780846701569. A historical perspective of the battle of Custer's Last Stand- and leading up to the battle-with an offering of a theory that the men in Custer's command may have panicked, and fearing torture-committed suicide. With an introduction by a Sioux survivor, "Turkey Leg" who was 17 at the time of the battle.

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Keep the last bullet for yourself: The true story of Custer's last stand: Thomas Bailey Marquis: 9780917256028 .

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Marquis, Thomas Bailey, 1869-1935, Publication, Distribution, et. New York (C) 2017-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

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Keep the Last Bullet for Yourself epub download

ISBN13: 978-0917256141

ISBN: 091725614X

Author: Thomas Bailey Marquis

Category: Other

Subcategory: Humanities

Language: English

Publisher: Reference Pubns; 2 edition (June 1, 1976)

ePUB size: 1106 kb

FB2 size: 1982 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 443

Other Formats: docx mobi mbr lrf

Related to Keep the Last Bullet for Yourself ePub books

Hugighma
I have been a student of the battle all my life, read every book, seen every movie. I have always believed that the Indian accounts of the story of the battle need to be listened to, but am slow in coming to this book for some reason, but now that I have gotten to it, what rings here is the ring of truth, and the ring of truth is what has always been missing from the tale of the Battle of Little Bighorn. I've always been puzzled by the lack of Indian deaths at LBH-I've never read of any real estimate of more than 80-if the battle transpired as it is generally claimed to have happened, it should have been a bloodbath. In order for Custer's men to have been annihilated as they were, the Sioux and the Cheyenne would have to abandoned their traditional manner of fighting for this one day and mounted their own version of Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg. Certainly the Indians possessed the number of men to overwhelm Custer in that manner, but no evidence attested to by the whites most immediately on the scene suggests it happened that way. Marquis' story is crafted from many years of listening to those who had been there-and the key here is that he truly listened and learned the ways of the Cheyenne. In making his case, Marquis is objective with no agenda to advance or axe to grind. He doesn't excoriate Custer, Reno, or take any part of the 'blame' game that has gone on since June 25, 1876, he just tells the story and analyzes the information provided by his informants and is better writing than I anticipated.
Hugighma
I have been a student of the battle all my life, read every book, seen every movie. I have always believed that the Indian accounts of the story of the battle need to be listened to, but am slow in coming to this book for some reason, but now that I have gotten to it, what rings here is the ring of truth, and the ring of truth is what has always been missing from the tale of the Battle of Little Bighorn. I've always been puzzled by the lack of Indian deaths at LBH-I've never read of any real estimate of more than 80-if the battle transpired as it is generally claimed to have happened, it should have been a bloodbath. In order for Custer's men to have been annihilated as they were, the Sioux and the Cheyenne would have to abandoned their traditional manner of fighting for this one day and mounted their own version of Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg. Certainly the Indians possessed the number of men to overwhelm Custer in that manner, but no evidence attested to by the whites most immediately on the scene suggests it happened that way. Marquis' story is crafted from many years of listening to those who had been there-and the key here is that he truly listened and learned the ways of the Cheyenne. In making his case, Marquis is objective with no agenda to advance or axe to grind. He doesn't excoriate Custer, Reno, or take any part of the 'blame' game that has gone on since June 25, 1876, he just tells the story and analyzes the information provided by his informants and is better writing than I anticipated.
Tcaruieb
I have read about 10 Custer books in print and a couple on my Kindle. I am not sure why I ordered this book, maybe the reviews, but I have found it very good. The blow by blow of the Battle was very good. The other information either added or reinforced my Custer knowledge. The reading is easy and the print is readable without a magnifying glass. I'm not sure why some of the paperback books on Custer have unreadable tiny print. This book and others have mentioned certain suicides among the soldiers fighting. I will compare with an archeology book that will hopefully shed more light on this aspect of the Battle. This book doesn't dwell on suicide. That is why I found it worth reading.
Tcaruieb
I have read about 10 Custer books in print and a couple on my Kindle. I am not sure why I ordered this book, maybe the reviews, but I have found it very good. The blow by blow of the Battle was very good. The other information either added or reinforced my Custer knowledge. The reading is easy and the print is readable without a magnifying glass. I'm not sure why some of the paperback books on Custer have unreadable tiny print. This book and others have mentioned certain suicides among the soldiers fighting. I will compare with an archeology book that will hopefully shed more light on this aspect of the Battle. This book doesn't dwell on suicide. That is why I found it worth reading.
Kit
Tremendous story by a man who trod the ground, and communicated with Native American participants in sign language. Persuasive and believable. PS I'm on p. 128 and no one has shot himself yet. The book is not all about soldiers killing themselves; it's a telling of the battle, and events leading up to it, in a new light.
Kit
Tremendous story by a man who trod the ground, and communicated with Native American participants in sign language. Persuasive and believable. PS I'm on p. 128 and no one has shot himself yet. The book is not all about soldiers killing themselves; it's a telling of the battle, and events leading up to it, in a new light.
Mave
Fascinating story from the only survivors of the battle on the Little Bighorn June 1976. Written by someone who took the time to understand Native American culture.
Mave
Fascinating story from the only survivors of the battle on the Little Bighorn June 1976. Written by someone who took the time to understand Native American culture.
Globus
Dated, but interesting to read about a early 1900's view.
Globus
Dated, but interesting to read about a early 1900's view.
Gaxaisvem
this book was at times was sad,but still a good read.one of the best books I have read on Custer's Last Stand.
Gaxaisvem
this book was at times was sad,but still a good read.one of the best books I have read on Custer's Last Stand.
Ishnllador
An interesting take on Custer's last stand.
Ishnllador
An interesting take on Custer's last stand.
Good book
Good book