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People's Power: Cuba's Experience With Representative Government (Latin American Perspectives Series) epub download

by Peter Roman


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Xi, 284 pages : 24 cm. "People's Power presents a theoretical, historical, and contemporary analysis of representative government in Cuba

Xi, 284 pages : 24 cm. "People's Power presents a theoretical, historical, and contemporary analysis of representative government in Cuba. It explains how the Cuban model was built on the theoretical foundations set in Rousseau, Marx, and Lenin, and the historical precedents of the Paris Commune, the 1905 and 1917 Soviets, and the pre- and post-Stalin years of the Soviet Union. The book's primary focus is on the municipal level, but it also contains important material on the national and provincial elected bodies.

tends to view economic policy in Cuba from the perspective of the ‘end of history’, liberal consensus whereby economic liberalization is the only game in town. Richard Gott, Cuba: A New History, 2004: o Nationalism was more important in Castro's ideology than socialism, with Marti being mroe influential than Marxist ideology, with its emphasis on class conflict.

It was established in 1974 and is currently published by SAGE Publications. LAP is the journal in the Latin American Studies category of Google Scholar Metrics.

Description: Latin American Perspectives discusses and debates the . Cuba's Experience with Representative Government by Peter Roman.

Most issues of this stimulating journal focus on a single issue, nation, or region. Latin American Perspectives offers a vital multidisciplinary view of: Economics - the moral, political, and social desirability of economic policies. Political Science - the patterns of social action that underlie the operation of nations, the competition for power, and the conduct and misconduct of governments.

Places Riverside, California Latin American Perspectives Posts. This book is part of LAP's critical currents series. English (UK) · Русский · Українська · Suomi · Español. Latin American Perspectives.

Home Browse Books Book details, On the Rim of Mexico: Cuba's .

Home Browse Books Book details, On the Rim of Mexico: Cuba's Experience with. On the Rim of Mexico: Cuba's Experience with Representative Government. Considerations on Representative Government By John Stuart Mill H. Holt and C. 1890. The New Politics of Inequality in Latin America: Rethinking Participation and Representation By Douglas A. Chalmers; Carlos M. Vilas; Katherine Hite; Scott B. Martin; Kerianne Piester; Monique Segarra Oxford University Press, 1997.

government adviser and Dean of the American University School of Public Affairs leads a book-bound tour that takes us from the Bacardi dynasty in Cuba to American military interventions in Central America. When I was at college, I was very interested in American foreign policy. It occurred to me that Latin America was the region with which the United States had the longest history of involvement – and the most intense relationship. That led me to study the internal politics of Latin-American countries – politics that are directly influenced by the relationship with the United States. Washington has dominated the hemisphere for the last 200 years.

Most issues focus on a single problem, nation, or region, providing an in-depth look from participants and scholars throughout the Americas.

People's Power is a theoretical and historical account of representative government in Cuba. It explains how the Cuban model was built on the theoretical foundations set in Rousseau, Marx, and Lenin, and the historical precedents of the Paris Commune, the 1905 and 1917 soviets, and the pre- and post-Stalin years of the Soviet Union. It encompasses the institution of the Organs of People's Power in 1974, through the changes brought by the 1992 Constitution and election law, to the present. The book's primary focus is on the municipal level, but it also contains important material on the national and provincial elected bodies. People's Power also explores firsthand the more recent people's councils and workers' parliaments.

People's Power: Cuba's Experience With Representative Government (Latin American Perspectives Series) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0813335865

ISBN: 0813335868

Author: Peter Roman

Category: Other

Subcategory: Humanities

Language: English

Publisher: Westview Press (June 24, 1999)

Pages: 296 pages

ePUB size: 1638 kb

FB2 size: 1374 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 247

Other Formats: txt lit rtf azw

Related to People's Power: Cuba's Experience With Representative Government (Latin American Perspectives Series) ePub books

Bajinn
I bought this book because I am interested in the political and economic history of Cuba. After reading dozens of books on Cuba (both in favor and against), I believe this one is one that all scholars on the genre should have.

It is very common to find scholar books on Cuba with a political bias in them. Most books I have read are negative towards Cuba's democratization. Most people believe that Cuba is a totalitarian state, however Roman disproves this political myth. Cuba has been going through a democratization process since 1959. It has made various changes to the Constitution to further push their democratization.

Dr. Roman introduces the reader to the political system of Cuba by first describing the grassroots, or local, political structures, its functions, services, and relationship to the public citizenry. He then takes the reader through a historical analysis of Cuba's democratic heritage. The chapters that follow are related to each other in that they each continue to describe the political structure of Cuba and the role of the constituents and the politicians.

Roman assures us that Cuba has had a tradition of the "mandat imperatif" (instructed delagate); that the constituents have a close relationship with their political representative; that constituents can recall their representatives at any time; political transparency is also existent because the constituents can attend public meetings to hear about their representatives work in progress.

Although I believe this book is of great importance to students, scholars and lay readers interested in Cuba's political system, Roman's writing can get boring and confusing at times. Confusing, perhaps should be directed at the fact that he is describing a political system, thus the writing can get boring or long. The writing is in small font and the chapters can get long, but I still recommend this book because it is unique in its own field. I don't know, or I am not aware, of any other scholar book that makes an objective description and analysis of Cuba's political system.
Bajinn
I bought this book because I am interested in the political and economic history of Cuba. After reading dozens of books on Cuba (both in favor and against), I believe this one is one that all scholars on the genre should have.

It is very common to find scholar books on Cuba with a political bias in them. Most books I have read are negative towards Cuba's democratization. Most people believe that Cuba is a totalitarian state, however Roman disproves this political myth. Cuba has been going through a democratization process since 1959. It has made various changes to the Constitution to further push their democratization.

Dr. Roman introduces the reader to the political system of Cuba by first describing the grassroots, or local, political structures, its functions, services, and relationship to the public citizenry. He then takes the reader through a historical analysis of Cuba's democratic heritage. The chapters that follow are related to each other in that they each continue to describe the political structure of Cuba and the role of the constituents and the politicians.

Roman assures us that Cuba has had a tradition of the "mandat imperatif" (instructed delagate); that the constituents have a close relationship with their political representative; that constituents can recall their representatives at any time; political transparency is also existent because the constituents can attend public meetings to hear about their representatives work in progress.

Although I believe this book is of great importance to students, scholars and lay readers interested in Cuba's political system, Roman's writing can get boring and confusing at times. Confusing, perhaps should be directed at the fact that he is describing a political system, thus the writing can get boring or long. The writing is in small font and the chapters can get long, but I still recommend this book because it is unique in its own field. I don't know, or I am not aware, of any other scholar book that makes an objective description and analysis of Cuba's political system.
Gozragore
Peter Roman, professor of political science at The Graduate Center, The City University of New York, has written a fascinating and illuminating study of democracy in Cuba.

People's Power was piloted in the province of Matanzas in 1974 and set up nationally in 1976. Cuba holds competitive elections for municipal delegates, with candidates nominated by the people (not by the Communist Party). There are usually 4-7 candidates (never fewer than two).

There is no campaigning for or against any candidate; negative campaigning is not allowed. There are no electoral promises or bribes or funding. There are no lobbyists to promote private interests over the general good.

The delegates are unpaid, and their work is in addition to their regular work, so Cuba has no caste of professional politicians. The delegates do not represent themselves, or parties; they have to act in the interests of the whole people. Delegates have to live in their electoral districts and have to account to their constituents at all times. The constituents formally instruct the delegates, and have the right of immediate recall. The delegates hold weekly meetings and six-monthly report-back meetings with their constituents, when the electorate holds them to account.

Municipal and provincial assemblies must meet at least twice a year. Since 1993, there have been direct elections to the higher parliamentary bodies, the provincial assemblies and the National Assembly. The National Assembly meets twice a year, for two days. It has ten permanent commissions.

The US state, Cuban exiles and dissidents always call on the Cuban people to abstain or spoil their ballot papers in national elections. In the 1993 National Assembly elections, just 7.67 per cent abstained or spoilt their ballot papers, in the 1998 elections, 6.65 per cent, in 2003, 6.25 per cent.
Gozragore
Peter Roman, professor of political science at The Graduate Center, The City University of New York, has written a fascinating and illuminating study of democracy in Cuba.

People's Power was piloted in the province of Matanzas in 1974 and set up nationally in 1976. Cuba holds competitive elections for municipal delegates, with candidates nominated by the people (not by the Communist Party). There are usually 4-7 candidates (never fewer than two).

There is no campaigning for or against any candidate; negative campaigning is not allowed. There are no electoral promises or bribes or funding. There are no lobbyists to promote private interests over the general good.

The delegates are unpaid, and their work is in addition to their regular work, so Cuba has no caste of professional politicians. The delegates do not represent themselves, or parties; they have to act in the interests of the whole people. Delegates have to live in their electoral districts and have to account to their constituents at all times. The constituents formally instruct the delegates, and have the right of immediate recall. The delegates hold weekly meetings and six-monthly report-back meetings with their constituents, when the electorate holds them to account.

Municipal and provincial assemblies must meet at least twice a year. Since 1993, there have been direct elections to the higher parliamentary bodies, the provincial assemblies and the National Assembly. The National Assembly meets twice a year, for two days. It has ten permanent commissions.

The US state, Cuban exiles and dissidents always call on the Cuban people to abstain or spoil their ballot papers in national elections. In the 1993 National Assembly elections, just 7.67 per cent abstained or spoilt their ballot papers, in the 1998 elections, 6.65 per cent, in 2003, 6.25 per cent.
Jwalextell
Contrary to what we have been led to believe, Cuba does have elections--just not our kind of elections. Peter Roman presents a comprehensive analysis of Cuba's municipal and provincial electoral system, based on years of study and numerous visits, as well as actually living on the island. It also provides the ideological and theoretical underpinnings of this system, going back to the Paris Commune, Marxist concepts about the nature of society and the original soviet system. This book will challenge people's assumptions about the superiority of our two-party, adversarial electoral system. Roman is a scholar who has not lost the ability to write in plain English. A good read.
Jwalextell
Contrary to what we have been led to believe, Cuba does have elections--just not our kind of elections. Peter Roman presents a comprehensive analysis of Cuba's municipal and provincial electoral system, based on years of study and numerous visits, as well as actually living on the island. It also provides the ideological and theoretical underpinnings of this system, going back to the Paris Commune, Marxist concepts about the nature of society and the original soviet system. This book will challenge people's assumptions about the superiority of our two-party, adversarial electoral system. Roman is a scholar who has not lost the ability to write in plain English. A good read.