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Let's Learn Twi: Ma Yensua Twi (English and Twi Edition) epub download

by Paul A. Kotey


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Twi Kasa Mmara/Twi Grammar 1. When a. .Twi Kasa Mmara/Twi Grammar 1. When a pronoun is acting as a subject of a verb, then the pronouns is written together with the verb. Paul Washer - Do you see God working on your life?

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Let's Learn Twi : Ma Yensua Twi. Paperback.

Let's Learn Twi : Ma Yensua Twi. English, Twi. By (author) Paul A. Kotey. Format Paperback 260 pages.

Published by Africa World Pr (2000).

Let's Go Level 2 Student Book includes eight thematic units with four lessons per unit. oxford university press - Let's go english series. ESL textbooks for children.

This guide to Twi, the language of the Akan people of Ghana, incorporates Akan culture into the instruction. While primarily of use to the lay person, it will, however, also be welcomed by the more academic linguist wishing to learn more about the language's structure.

Let's Learn Twi: Ma Yensua Twi (English and Twi Edition) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0865438545

ISBN: 0865438544

Author: Paul A. Kotey

Category: Other

Subcategory: Humanities

Language: English Twi

Publisher: Africa World Pr (October 15, 2000)

Pages: 260 pages

ePUB size: 1694 kb

FB2 size: 1953 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 840

Other Formats: txt azw rtf lrf

Related to Let's Learn Twi: Ma Yensua Twi (English and Twi Edition) ePub books

Nten
This book states clearly in the introduction that it is not designed to be used as a self-study course. Also note that it is dedicated to teaching the Akuapem Twi dialect, NOT Asante Twi, Akan, or Fanti, although they are quite similar and mutually intelligible. Knowing and distinguishing the differences could be confusing for a beginning learner, so its important to know which dialect you want to learn and stick to it at least until you're proficient.
New vocabulary crops up quickly and often as this book progresses from basic to intermediate to advanced Akuapem Twi rather rapidly. Many of the words are not explicitly defined or translated. I appreciate the numerous readings, or literary excerpts -- most of them with English translations -- that expose the learner to authentic Twi. Exercises also abound. Even the headings and lesson titles appear first in Twi with English equivalents below them. The result is greater immersion and exposure to the language.
Again, the book is ideal when used with a fluent - and competent - Twi instructor, and this is strongly advised at the outset. However, if you're an ambitious and adept self-learner and already have a handle on Twi pronunciation you would likely find this a valuable resource thanks to its ample content. When it says "Let's Learn Twi" it means it. The book's progressing to more advanced material at a rapid pace will be for some learner's a flaw and for others, a strength.
Nten
This book states clearly in the introduction that it is not designed to be used as a self-study course. Also note that it is dedicated to teaching the Akuapem Twi dialect, NOT Asante Twi, Akan, or Fanti, although they are quite similar and mutually intelligible. Knowing and distinguishing the differences could be confusing for a beginning learner, so its important to know which dialect you want to learn and stick to it at least until you're proficient.
New vocabulary crops up quickly and often as this book progresses from basic to intermediate to advanced Akuapem Twi rather rapidly. Many of the words are not explicitly defined or translated. I appreciate the numerous readings, or literary excerpts -- most of them with English translations -- that expose the learner to authentic Twi. Exercises also abound. Even the headings and lesson titles appear first in Twi with English equivalents below them. The result is greater immersion and exposure to the language.
Again, the book is ideal when used with a fluent - and competent - Twi instructor, and this is strongly advised at the outset. However, if you're an ambitious and adept self-learner and already have a handle on Twi pronunciation you would likely find this a valuable resource thanks to its ample content. When it says "Let's Learn Twi" it means it. The book's progressing to more advanced material at a rapid pace will be for some learner's a flaw and for others, a strength.
Ydely
This is an Akuapem Twi text (not Ashanti Twi). Although I have set out to learn Ashanti Twi I have found a lot of useful grammar tips in this text. If you are just setting out to learn Ashanti Twi then I would only recommend this text if you have a good teacher or friend that can point out the subtle differences between the two dialects (suffice it to say that there is great overlap between Ashanti and Akuapem Twi).

Two things I would have liked to see with this text were:
- Audio.
- Answer key.

Otherwise, this is a decent text for what the author set out to accomplish.
Ydely
This is an Akuapem Twi text (not Ashanti Twi). Although I have set out to learn Ashanti Twi I have found a lot of useful grammar tips in this text. If you are just setting out to learn Ashanti Twi then I would only recommend this text if you have a good teacher or friend that can point out the subtle differences between the two dialects (suffice it to say that there is great overlap between Ashanti and Akuapem Twi).

Two things I would have liked to see with this text were:
- Audio.
- Answer key.

Otherwise, this is a decent text for what the author set out to accomplish.
Rainpick
Nice tool to learn the language.
Rainpick
Nice tool to learn the language.
Puchock
As someone who has knowledge of 9 languages (amongst which 7 western and 2 local African dialects) I must kindly indicate that from experience, one should never attempt to learn a language (especially African dialects) on their own. It basically is a waste of time not to get help.
The term "self-thought" does not apply with languages unfortunately.
In Africa and in English as far as I know, anything labeled as for "beginners" stands for the "starting point"... "preschool" basically. And we all know that no one throws children/beginners into a preschool room and expect them to fend for themselves. help is always there.
Same way, as an adult trying to learn any language you must get a native, a teacher or extra language tools on your side to be able to be successful.
With local African dialects, please do get a native's help. this will be your only sure bet.
In preschool the help is provided but unfortunately later in life we have to find the "help" that better suits our need.

To any one who want to buy this book or any other language book, please get extra help more especially from a native.

This book offers all you need to have a well rounded foundation in a language. The comprehensive exercises without the answers cause you to think and link the lessons together which really is the ultimate goal of learning languages... being able to think in that language that is.

You have a great deal with this book just saying... but make sure you always get a native's help when you are trying to lern any language at all.

Thanks.
Puchock
As someone who has knowledge of 9 languages (amongst which 7 western and 2 local African dialects) I must kindly indicate that from experience, one should never attempt to learn a language (especially African dialects) on their own. It basically is a waste of time not to get help.
The term "self-thought" does not apply with languages unfortunately.
In Africa and in English as far as I know, anything labeled as for "beginners" stands for the "starting point"... "preschool" basically. And we all know that no one throws children/beginners into a preschool room and expect them to fend for themselves. help is always there.
Same way, as an adult trying to learn any language you must get a native, a teacher or extra language tools on your side to be able to be successful.
With local African dialects, please do get a native's help. this will be your only sure bet.
In preschool the help is provided but unfortunately later in life we have to find the "help" that better suits our need.

To any one who want to buy this book or any other language book, please get extra help more especially from a native.

This book offers all you need to have a well rounded foundation in a language. The comprehensive exercises without the answers cause you to think and link the lessons together which really is the ultimate goal of learning languages... being able to think in that language that is.

You have a great deal with this book just saying... but make sure you always get a native's help when you are trying to lern any language at all.

Thanks.
Qulcelat
It is perhaps unkind to criticise this work as being a very poor choice for someone wishing to learn Twi by themselves, when the book itself says: "This book is written for Beginner and for early Intermediate level learners. The instructor must be either a native Akuapem Twi speaker, or a near native Akuapem Twi speaker. The text is therefore not meant to be a 'teach yourself' book." Unfortunately, I had no way of knowing this when I bought the book, and only realised when it was too late to return it.
If you are lucky enough to be able to attend a course where this is the required text (which I imagine would not be the case for most people searching for a book on Twi through Amazon), then I am sure that Ma Yensua Twi would rate an unqualified 5 stars. With its delightful illustrations, it is the most beautifully presented language book I have ever seen. It is also, obviously, a very well thought out course, combining grammar; reading; dictation; translation; word substitution and other exercises.
With this in mind, and given the fairly limited range of materials available to someone who wants to learn Twi, you may be tempted to buy it anyway, perhaps to supplement other materials you already have, or on the theory that any learning resource is better than nothing. Here's why I don't think Ma Yensua Twi is useful outside of its intended context:
1. If you have no existing knowledge of Twi, and you are trying to learn the language on your own, you NEED a course that comes with tapes. Even armed with a good written guide to pronunciation (which this book does have), some Twi sounds are extraordinarily difficult to master, having no phonetic equivalent in English. And even if you are able to get the sound of a word right, the chances are you will get the stress wrong or, worse still, the tones (combinations of high, mid or low; long or short) which can change the meaning of a word completely. For example, words that initially all sound quite similar to "papa" (at least to a bloke from south London) can mean any of: father; good; to pat; a fan.
2. Virtually all of the exercises in Ma Yensua Twi are, by their very design, of no use outside their intended context of live tuition: many of the reading exercises have no English translations; there are no answers to the translation exercises; the dictation exercises are simply "Instructor selects Akuapem Twi Words, Phrases, and Sentences covered to date for this exercise"; and some of the exercises involve improvised group role play.
3. In the 25 chapters in which Ma Yensua Twi covers a wide variety of social and cultural situations, extensive vocabulary is introduced and grammatical points are explained in a clear style. This is really the only area where Ma Yensua Twi is of any use at all to someone who is unable to use the book as part of a taught course. But, as a supplement to other Twi resources, Ma Yensua Twi may be more confusing than helpful. This is because, unlike the other Twi materials that I have been able to get hold of, Ma Yensua Twi is a course in Akuapim (Akuapem), rather than (by far the more widely spoken) Ashanti (Asante) Twi. (As far as I am aware, nothing is easy to come by that covers Fanti (Fante/Mfantse) Twi.) Although I have heard that Akuapim Twi is often regarded as the prestige Twi dialect, and indeed, that all dialects of Twi are mutually intelligible, the fact remains that when you are learning the language and are not an experienced speaker (as I am not), it only makes the task more difficult if you are giving yourself the additional headache of trying to master differences between dialects. To illustrate the point (and perhaps this is an extreme example), "Yefere no sen?" in Ashanti, meaning "What is it called?", is "Wu din de den?" in Akuapim Twi. Enough said.
Please let me be clear (and partly to assuage my guilt for having given this book a one-star rating) that I am not saying this is a bad book per se. I think if you are able to attend classes where an appropriate instructor follows this course, or if you have the resources available for private tuition, then Ma Yensua Twi would be an excellent learning tool. If, however, you are unable to do either of these, then don't bother buying it.
Qulcelat
It is perhaps unkind to criticise this work as being a very poor choice for someone wishing to learn Twi by themselves, when the book itself says: "This book is written for Beginner and for early Intermediate level learners. The instructor must be either a native Akuapem Twi speaker, or a near native Akuapem Twi speaker. The text is therefore not meant to be a 'teach yourself' book." Unfortunately, I had no way of knowing this when I bought the book, and only realised when it was too late to return it.
If you are lucky enough to be able to attend a course where this is the required text (which I imagine would not be the case for most people searching for a book on Twi through Amazon), then I am sure that Ma Yensua Twi would rate an unqualified 5 stars. With its delightful illustrations, it is the most beautifully presented language book I have ever seen. It is also, obviously, a very well thought out course, combining grammar; reading; dictation; translation; word substitution and other exercises.
With this in mind, and given the fairly limited range of materials available to someone who wants to learn Twi, you may be tempted to buy it anyway, perhaps to supplement other materials you already have, or on the theory that any learning resource is better than nothing. Here's why I don't think Ma Yensua Twi is useful outside of its intended context:
1. If you have no existing knowledge of Twi, and you are trying to learn the language on your own, you NEED a course that comes with tapes. Even armed with a good written guide to pronunciation (which this book does have), some Twi sounds are extraordinarily difficult to master, having no phonetic equivalent in English. And even if you are able to get the sound of a word right, the chances are you will get the stress wrong or, worse still, the tones (combinations of high, mid or low; long or short) which can change the meaning of a word completely. For example, words that initially all sound quite similar to "papa" (at least to a bloke from south London) can mean any of: father; good; to pat; a fan.
2. Virtually all of the exercises in Ma Yensua Twi are, by their very design, of no use outside their intended context of live tuition: many of the reading exercises have no English translations; there are no answers to the translation exercises; the dictation exercises are simply "Instructor selects Akuapem Twi Words, Phrases, and Sentences covered to date for this exercise"; and some of the exercises involve improvised group role play.
3. In the 25 chapters in which Ma Yensua Twi covers a wide variety of social and cultural situations, extensive vocabulary is introduced and grammatical points are explained in a clear style. This is really the only area where Ma Yensua Twi is of any use at all to someone who is unable to use the book as part of a taught course. But, as a supplement to other Twi resources, Ma Yensua Twi may be more confusing than helpful. This is because, unlike the other Twi materials that I have been able to get hold of, Ma Yensua Twi is a course in Akuapim (Akuapem), rather than (by far the more widely spoken) Ashanti (Asante) Twi. (As far as I am aware, nothing is easy to come by that covers Fanti (Fante/Mfantse) Twi.) Although I have heard that Akuapim Twi is often regarded as the prestige Twi dialect, and indeed, that all dialects of Twi are mutually intelligible, the fact remains that when you are learning the language and are not an experienced speaker (as I am not), it only makes the task more difficult if you are giving yourself the additional headache of trying to master differences between dialects. To illustrate the point (and perhaps this is an extreme example), "Yefere no sen?" in Ashanti, meaning "What is it called?", is "Wu din de den?" in Akuapim Twi. Enough said.
Please let me be clear (and partly to assuage my guilt for having given this book a one-star rating) that I am not saying this is a bad book per se. I think if you are able to attend classes where an appropriate instructor follows this course, or if you have the resources available for private tuition, then Ma Yensua Twi would be an excellent learning tool. If, however, you are unable to do either of these, then don't bother buying it.