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Afghanistan: Soviet Vietnam epub download

by Vladislav Tamarov


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Afghanistan: Soviet Vietnam. by Vladislav Tamarov.

Vladislav Tamarov's Afghanistan: Soviet Vietnam was one of the most engaging books I read in 1994. I sincerely doubt that any reader will be unaffected by it. While the personal perspective at times allows for odd interpretations (for example, the author seems to believe that the war was fought to maintain drug traffic), the book repeatedly drives home the foolishness and inhumanity of the Afghan campaign.

Afghanistan: Soviet Vietnam was written by a Soviet veteran who served in Afghanistan for two years. All these books after critical analysis gave me the information. Bibliography: 1. Vladislav Tamarov, Afghanistan: Soviet Vietnam (San Francisco: Mercury House, 1992). Of course he supported the Soviet’s military forces, so I used this source only to show the general mood of soldiers during the Afghan War. The author’s personal opinion was taken for this. 2. Mark Galeotti, Afghanistan: The Soviet Union’s Last War (London: Bookcraft (Bath) Lt. Midsomer Norton, 1995). 3. M. Hassan Kakar, Afghanistan (Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1995).

Afghanistan - Soviet Vietnam. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Afghanistan - Soviet Vietnam from your list? Afghanistan - Soviet Vietnam. Published 1992 by Mercury House in San Francisco.

Informationen zum Titel Afghanistan: Soviet Vietnam von Vladislav Tamarov [mit Kurzbeschreibung und . Tamarov was a member of the Soviet Union's Airborne Assault Force and served on the front lines in Afghanistan as part of a minesweeping team

Informationen zum Titel Afghanistan: Soviet Vietnam von Vladislav Tamarov Tamarov was a member of the Soviet Union's Airborne Assault Force and served on the front lines in Afghanistan as part of a minesweeping team. Secretly keeping a detailed journal and photographic record of his combat missions in the mountais, Tamarov captured the fear, futility, and violence of an insane war. keywords. Afghanistan, Asia, Asian – Middle Eastern history

A Russian Soldier’s Story. In 1984 Tamarov, then 19, was drafted into the Soviet Army and posted to Afghanistan where he spent 20 months in a minesweeper outfit

A Russian Soldier’s Story. In 1984 Tamarov, then 19, was drafted into the Soviet Army and posted to Afghanistan where he spent 20 months in a minesweeper outfit. Despite heavy operational responsibilities and danger, he managed to take artful photographs which capture the stark landscape, friendly and unfriendly Afghans and the men of his platoon in action and in repose.

A photo essay by a veteran of the Soviet army who spent twenty months in Afghanistan reveals the fear and violence of a senseless war

Afghanistan: Soviet Vietnam epub download

ISBN13: 978-1562790219

ISBN: 1562790218

Author: Vladislav Tamarov

Category: Other

Subcategory: Humanities

Language: English

Publisher: Mercury House; y First edition edition (May 1, 1992)

Pages: 192 pages

ePUB size: 1198 kb

FB2 size: 1677 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 180

Other Formats: mbr doc txt lit

Related to Afghanistan: Soviet Vietnam ePub books

Quashant
Vladislav Tamarov's harrowing experience growing up into manhood in a god forsaken place like Soviet held Afghanistan has left such a profound impact on the reader. All the questions that news reporters ask veterans seem trite and disrespectful to those that went through the experience of war. The heart-wrenching trial of being sent by a government that does not take no for an answer coupled with the tumultuous pain of watching a generation be slaughtered by bullet, rocket and mine; tips the scale for each day being its own torture chamber. However, the only drive to keep going is the strangling will to live to see the next day where everyone sharing your space is subjected to the same uncertainty of not surviving. This book shines both a spotlight on the injustice of being sent to a futile war that does not have clear objectives and tragic price to be paid for being in an alien land. The stark honesty of the author pulls no punches about what he saw and what he tragically did. This is a fantastic introduction to the Soviet-Afghan War, as it calls the reader to forget everything he or she thinks they know about this conflict. After having read other war primary sources, it begs the question: why are they not like Mr. Tamarov's? Why do they hide so much of the horror of war? Does that not say something essential about what others hide or view perhaps as not being "a good soldier"? No matter the answer to these questions, Mr. Tamarov shows the bitter truth and leaves the reader to feel overwhelming empathy and compassion for he and his comrades that were sent to fight in a conflict where "soldiers fulfilling their international duty". Hard to feel like they were lied to and died for nothing in the steppes of the Hindu Kush, and elsewhere. The war for something or nothing, the book sheds light on the scars left on the bodies and in the minds of all that served.

Highly recommended to anyone interested in the emotional torture of war in the modern age.
Quashant
Vladislav Tamarov's harrowing experience growing up into manhood in a god forsaken place like Soviet held Afghanistan has left such a profound impact on the reader. All the questions that news reporters ask veterans seem trite and disrespectful to those that went through the experience of war. The heart-wrenching trial of being sent by a government that does not take no for an answer coupled with the tumultuous pain of watching a generation be slaughtered by bullet, rocket and mine; tips the scale for each day being its own torture chamber. However, the only drive to keep going is the strangling will to live to see the next day where everyone sharing your space is subjected to the same uncertainty of not surviving. This book shines both a spotlight on the injustice of being sent to a futile war that does not have clear objectives and tragic price to be paid for being in an alien land. The stark honesty of the author pulls no punches about what he saw and what he tragically did. This is a fantastic introduction to the Soviet-Afghan War, as it calls the reader to forget everything he or she thinks they know about this conflict. After having read other war primary sources, it begs the question: why are they not like Mr. Tamarov's? Why do they hide so much of the horror of war? Does that not say something essential about what others hide or view perhaps as not being "a good soldier"? No matter the answer to these questions, Mr. Tamarov shows the bitter truth and leaves the reader to feel overwhelming empathy and compassion for he and his comrades that were sent to fight in a conflict where "soldiers fulfilling their international duty". Hard to feel like they were lied to and died for nothing in the steppes of the Hindu Kush, and elsewhere. The war for something or nothing, the book sheds light on the scars left on the bodies and in the minds of all that served.

Highly recommended to anyone interested in the emotional torture of war in the modern age.
Kashicage
This book grabs you from the very start. It doesn't matter if you grew up hating Russkies. The author proves he is as human as the rest of us - only doing a thankless job in a distant country.
His strength and weakness is laid before the reader with apology for either.
Without commentary the photos could tell the story, but I am so glad the author "put the flesh" on his photo subjects.
Having been in AFG and traveling in some of the same locations, this is especially poignant for me.
Then end of the book will soften the hardest hearts - don't jump ahead!!!
Simply a wonderful story.
Kashicage
This book grabs you from the very start. It doesn't matter if you grew up hating Russkies. The author proves he is as human as the rest of us - only doing a thankless job in a distant country.
His strength and weakness is laid before the reader with apology for either.
Without commentary the photos could tell the story, but I am so glad the author "put the flesh" on his photo subjects.
Having been in AFG and traveling in some of the same locations, this is especially poignant for me.
Then end of the book will soften the hardest hearts - don't jump ahead!!!
Simply a wonderful story.
Gralinda
Tamarov's book is startling in its detail and vivid in its description of young Russian men at war. Like Vietnam, Russia was dealing with an unseen enemy and unclear objectives. To be thrust into such an environment of destruction at such an early age is truly the terrible lot of many young men from all nations and generations who have ever faced war. The photos in this book are both gripping and haunting as we follow Tamarov's experience into the conflict. At first we see him arriving in Afghanistan and as the pages turn we see him transformed into a desperate man fighting for his life and those of his comrades. This book. I believe is an epic statement to the Russian experience in Afghanistan. I would recommend this book to anyone with an interest in Soviet-Russian history, military historians and also to anyone interested in the terrors of war and what it was like to witness it.
Gralinda
Tamarov's book is startling in its detail and vivid in its description of young Russian men at war. Like Vietnam, Russia was dealing with an unseen enemy and unclear objectives. To be thrust into such an environment of destruction at such an early age is truly the terrible lot of many young men from all nations and generations who have ever faced war. The photos in this book are both gripping and haunting as we follow Tamarov's experience into the conflict. At first we see him arriving in Afghanistan and as the pages turn we see him transformed into a desperate man fighting for his life and those of his comrades. This book. I believe is an epic statement to the Russian experience in Afghanistan. I would recommend this book to anyone with an interest in Soviet-Russian history, military historians and also to anyone interested in the terrors of war and what it was like to witness it.
EROROHALO
I want to start off by saying I purchased this book with a few goals in mind; One, to learn more about the Soviet Invasion of Afghanistan. Two, learn of this war through the eyes of a soldier who fought in it. Three, to do this in a short, timely fashion- that is to say I wasn't much interested in a long, detailed, dry retelling of events. I can say this book did not disappoint and was exactly what I wanted.

As mentioned by other reviewers, the book is more or less a photo/diary like affair. The pictures alone (The author explains his deep passion for photography, and thusly recorded his time in Afghanistan) are worth the book's price. When I bought this book (many years ago) I was actually just in the beginning stages of my own war experiences as a US Army soldier in Iraq, so I felt it relevant to my circumstance at the time. When considering the violent, protracted war the US is currently involved with in Afghanistan, I feel this book adds important insight into the nature of the warfare experienced there, as well as adding an understanding of the countless difficulties faced by those fighting a war in this rugged terrain and against the rough-and-tough people who reside therein.

The stories the author shares range from happy filled moments, to pure tragedy and sadness. I found it particularly saddening when he shows a picture that depicts a group of young Soviet troops smiling, laughing, enjoying a small break, and then the written piece accompanying the photo relates that some of them would go on to die or be badly injured.

Near the end of the book, the author also shares stories of how he and other Russian veterans would meet with US veterans of the Vietnam War. They were drawn together by virtue the fact that both of these veteran groups suffered through hell, were fighting a war they likely didn't agree with, and were treated poorly by their fellow citizens upon arrival back home. I found it a somewhat inspiring story, given the fact that in both cases the enemy they were fighting was being aided by the homeland of the opposite veteran group.

All in all I highly recommend this book and feel confident the book will not disappoint.
EROROHALO
I want to start off by saying I purchased this book with a few goals in mind; One, to learn more about the Soviet Invasion of Afghanistan. Two, learn of this war through the eyes of a soldier who fought in it. Three, to do this in a short, timely fashion- that is to say I wasn't much interested in a long, detailed, dry retelling of events. I can say this book did not disappoint and was exactly what I wanted.

As mentioned by other reviewers, the book is more or less a photo/diary like affair. The pictures alone (The author explains his deep passion for photography, and thusly recorded his time in Afghanistan) are worth the book's price. When I bought this book (many years ago) I was actually just in the beginning stages of my own war experiences as a US Army soldier in Iraq, so I felt it relevant to my circumstance at the time. When considering the violent, protracted war the US is currently involved with in Afghanistan, I feel this book adds important insight into the nature of the warfare experienced there, as well as adding an understanding of the countless difficulties faced by those fighting a war in this rugged terrain and against the rough-and-tough people who reside therein.

The stories the author shares range from happy filled moments, to pure tragedy and sadness. I found it particularly saddening when he shows a picture that depicts a group of young Soviet troops smiling, laughing, enjoying a small break, and then the written piece accompanying the photo relates that some of them would go on to die or be badly injured.

Near the end of the book, the author also shares stories of how he and other Russian veterans would meet with US veterans of the Vietnam War. They were drawn together by virtue the fact that both of these veteran groups suffered through hell, were fighting a war they likely didn't agree with, and were treated poorly by their fellow citizens upon arrival back home. I found it a somewhat inspiring story, given the fact that in both cases the enemy they were fighting was being aided by the homeland of the opposite veteran group.

All in all I highly recommend this book and feel confident the book will not disappoint.