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The Tao of Islam: A Sourcebook on Gender Relationships in Islamic Thought epub download

by Annemarie Schimmel,Sachiko Murata


In "The Tao of Islam" Sachiko Murata uses the lens of gender ideas in Islam to explore in a comparative . Murata's work is already begining to exert its weight in Islamic studies departement's across Europe and North America.

In "The Tao of Islam" Sachiko Murata uses the lens of gender ideas in Islam to explore in a comparative religious framework the idea of a spirtual cosmology based on feminine and masculine principles. Although she is aware of the contemporary issues of women's legal status in Islam, she feels that such issues are not as fundamental as understanding the true role of gender within the cosmos. 14 people found this helpful.

The Tao of Islam book. Focusing on gender symbolism, Sachiko Murata shows that Muslim authors frequently analyze the divine reality and its connections with the cosmic and human domains with a view toward a The Tao of Islam is a rich and diverse anthology of Islamic teachings on the nature of the relationships between God and the world, the world and the human being, and the human being.

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Focusing on gender symbolism, Sachiko Murata shows that Muslim authors frequently analyze the divine reality .

Focusing on gender symbolism, Sachiko Murata shows that Muslim authors frequently analyze the divine reality and its connections with the cosmic and human domains with a view toward a complementarity or polarity of principles that is analogous to the Chinese idea of yin/yang. Murata believes that the unity of Islamic thought is found, not so much in the ideas discussed, as in the types of relationships that are set up among realities. The Tao of Islam is a rich and diverse anthology of Islamic teachings on the nature of the relationships between God and the world, the world and the human being, and the human being and God.

Focusing on gender symbolism, Sachiko Murata shows that Muslim authors frequently analyze the divine reality and its . She pays particular attention to the views of various figures commonly known as "Sufis" and "philosophers," since they approach these topics.

Электронная книга "Tao of Islam, The: A Sourcebook on Gender Relationships in Islamic Thought", Sachiko Murata. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Tao of Islam, The: A Sourcebook on Gender Relationships in Islamic Thought" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Murata, Sachiko, and William C. Chittick. New York: Paragon House, 1994. Cambridge: Islamic Texts Society, 2003. Nicholson, Reynold A. The Mystics of Islam. Beirut: Khayats, 1966. Nadeem, S. H. A Critical Appreciation of Arabic Mystical Poetry. New Delhi: Adam Publish- ers and Distributors, 2003. Women with Mustaches and Men without Beards: Gender and Sexual Anxieties of Iranian Modernity. - -. Studies in Islamic Mysticism. London: Cambridge University Press, 1921. Pourjavady, Nasrollah. Stories of Ah ˙ mad al-Ghaza ¯lı¯ ‘Playing the Witness’ in Tabrı¯z (Shams-i Tabrı¯zı¯’s Interest in sha ¯hid-ba ¯zı¯ ).

The Tao of Islam is truly a sourcebook of Islamic thought which is destined to become a classic. At the same time, the work is also bound to be controversial and misunderstood. At issue is the treatment of women in Islamic law. By focusing on the symbolic dimension of gender, Murata is sure to be misunderstood by two factions: legalists who do not care to see beyond the letter of the law, and those who are opposed to Islamic law. Members of both groups are sure to misinterpret Murata's thesis as the claim that the law can be jettisoned in favour of vague statements of symbolic value.

Similar books and articles. Sachiko Murata - 1994 - Philosophy East and West 44 (3):582-586. Islamic Philosophy and Theology: Critical Concepts in Islamic Thought. The Tao of Islam: A Sourcebook on Gender Relationships in Islamic Thought. Hospitality and Islam: Welcoming in God's Name. Mona Siddiqui - 2015 - Yale University Press. God and Humans in Islamic Thought: Abd Al-Jabbar, Ibn Sina and Al-Ghazali. Maha Elkaisy-Friemuth - 2006 - Routledge. Global Business Norms and Islamic Views of Women’s Employment. Jawad Syed & Harry J. Van Buren - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (2):251-276. Ian Richard Netton (e. - 2006 - Routledge.

Murata, Sachiko, 1943-. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. Publication, Distribution, et. Albany On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book The Tao of Islam : a sourcebook on gender relationships in Islamic thought, Sachiko Murata ; foreword by Annemarie Schimmel.

The Tao of Islam is a rich and diverse anthology of Islamic teachings on the nature of the relationships between God and the world, the world and the human being, and the human being and God. Focusing on gender symbolism, Sachiko Murata shows that Muslim authors frequently analyze the divine reality and its connections with the cosmic and human domains with a view toward a complementarity or polarity of principles that is analogous to the Chinese idea of yin/yang.Murata believes that the unity of Islamic thought is found, not so much in the ideas discussed, as in the types of relationships that are set up among realities. She pays particular attention to the views of various figures commonly known as "Sufis" and "philosophers," since they approach these topics with a flexibility and subtlety not found in other schools of thought. She translates several hundred pages, most for the first time, from more than thirty important Muslims including the Ikhwan al-Safa', Avicenna, and Ibn al-'Arabi.

The Tao of Islam: A Sourcebook on Gender Relationships in Islamic Thought epub download

ISBN13: 978-0791409145

ISBN: 0791409147

Author: Annemarie Schimmel,Sachiko Murata

Category: Other

Subcategory: Humanities

Language: English

Publisher: SUNY Press (March 23, 1992)

Pages: 410 pages

ePUB size: 1188 kb

FB2 size: 1600 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 362

Other Formats: mobi lrf lrf mbr

Related to The Tao of Islam: A Sourcebook on Gender Relationships in Islamic Thought ePub books

Agalen
The introduction, first/second chapter and post-script are really sufficient for anyone who wants to really understand the nature and the beauty of femininity (and masculinity) in traditional Islam
Agalen
The introduction, first/second chapter and post-script are really sufficient for anyone who wants to really understand the nature and the beauty of femininity (and masculinity) in traditional Islam
Goldendragon
In "The Tao of Islam" Sachiko Murata uses the lens of gender ideas in Islam to explore in a comparative religious framework the idea of a spirtual cosmology based on feminine and masculine principles. Although she is aware of the contemporary issues of women's legal status in Islam, she feels that such issues are not as fundamental as understanding the true role of gender within the cosmos. Those seeking arguments about whether the legal provisions of the Sharia (Islamic law) are or are not culpably sexist and what should be done about them if they are will not find much meat for their arguments in this book. Murata writes relatively clearly, and the writers she cites are often fascinating and insightful. They are, however, frequently prolix and I must say I found the book somewhat repetitive at times. (For this reason I gave the book 4 stars instead of 5.)

Professor Murata presents in this book a philosophy well-known to Platonism and which was also once familiar in the Christian West, but which is in danger of vanishing. In this philosophy, God, the cosmos (or the macrocosm), and the human self (microcosm) are the three great realities with the latter two stemming from and returning to God. The cosmos around us, and especially the human being in a superlative way, manifest as a kind of shadow the attributes of God. The highest purpose of studying the cosmos and the human self is thus to learn to recognize these manifestations of God's nature. Islamic writers in the Sufi Islamic tradition correlated these attributes into two fundamental families, that of majesty, awe, punishment, masculine, etc., and that of beauty, intimacy, mercy, feminine, etc. God is beautiful as well as majestic, intimate as well as awe-inspiring, merciful as well as punishing. Jalal (majesty) and jamal (beauty) are analogous to yang and yin of Chinese writings, while God matches the eternal Tao ("Way").

To manifest both His yang/jamal and His yin/jalal attributes visibly, God creates within the cosmos and human nature paired relations of yang-yin, jalal-jamal: heaven and earth, intellect and soul (both universal and in each person), spirit and nature, men and women. The productivity and fertility of these pairs is the sign of God's own abundance overflowing from His majesty and beauty. Things in the cosmos manifest these relations naturally, but human beings, having freedom, frequently damage these relation, with the yin elements rebelling against the yang and the yang elements forgetting their yin relation to God and tyrannizing over the yin.

As the creator and governor of all, God is primarily experienced by His creation naturally as powerful, active, and bright, i.e. jalal or yang. As a result God cannot normally be experienced by His creation but as a He, that is to say as manifesting yang/jalal attributes. Yet Sufi writers also recognize that God's Essence, apart from its relation with the cosmos, is like the true Tao mysterious, dark, and hidden from the sight and is thus in an absolute sense feminine. Yet such an understanding of God's yin/jamal nature must always be an esoteric understanding, compared to the exoteric understanding of God as yang/jalal.

Murata points out that the real enemy of this view of gender is not so much feminism (although feminism is certainly hostile to it), but the purely materialist vision of natural science. Materialism inquire only into mechanism, sees the cosmos and humanity as purposeless, and rejects the correlative thinking that sees the world around and inside us as keys to knowing God. Science has given us so much new knowledge about creation, yet we have not yet made sense of it as God's creation, demonstrating His attributes.

As Murata acknowledges, Islam's gendered cosmology is only one, albeit strikingly clear and articulate, contribution in the long tradition of spiritual cosmology. Murata compares Islamic cosmology to the Tao but her treatment of "Taoism" is the weakest part of the book. Her main source for "Taoism" is a superficial reading of the Yijing (I ching), but the Yijing is quite as much Confucian as it is Taoist, if not more (see the twelfth-century Neo-Confucian anthology "Reflections on Things at Hand" translated by Hok-lam Chan). Murata adheres closely to the ABC rule for modern spiritual writers ("anything but Christianity"), but the Christian readers will find in this book thought-provoking parallels to the several pairs of creation (light-dark, dry-wet, man-woman etc.) in Genesis 1, the feminine Wisdom as God's instrument in creation in Proverbs 8, the divine-human marriage language in Psalm 45 and Ephesians 5, and the structuring duality of works (jalal/yang) and grace (jamal/yin), Law and Gospel, Moses and Christ in St. Paul's epistles and St. John's gospel. Those involved in the debates over gender and sexuality now wracking parts of the Christian church will find Murata's book a powerful reminder that gender is not something under human control that we can remake as we wish--instead human gender is only one reflection of the fundamentally gendered fabric of the cosmos, itself made by God.
Goldendragon
In "The Tao of Islam" Sachiko Murata uses the lens of gender ideas in Islam to explore in a comparative religious framework the idea of a spirtual cosmology based on feminine and masculine principles. Although she is aware of the contemporary issues of women's legal status in Islam, she feels that such issues are not as fundamental as understanding the true role of gender within the cosmos. Those seeking arguments about whether the legal provisions of the Sharia (Islamic law) are or are not culpably sexist and what should be done about them if they are will not find much meat for their arguments in this book. Murata writes relatively clearly, and the writers she cites are often fascinating and insightful. They are, however, frequently prolix and I must say I found the book somewhat repetitive at times. (For this reason I gave the book 4 stars instead of 5.)

Professor Murata presents in this book a philosophy well-known to Platonism and which was also once familiar in the Christian West, but which is in danger of vanishing. In this philosophy, God, the cosmos (or the macrocosm), and the human self (microcosm) are the three great realities with the latter two stemming from and returning to God. The cosmos around us, and especially the human being in a superlative way, manifest as a kind of shadow the attributes of God. The highest purpose of studying the cosmos and the human self is thus to learn to recognize these manifestations of God's nature. Islamic writers in the Sufi Islamic tradition correlated these attributes into two fundamental families, that of majesty, awe, punishment, masculine, etc., and that of beauty, intimacy, mercy, feminine, etc. God is beautiful as well as majestic, intimate as well as awe-inspiring, merciful as well as punishing. Jalal (majesty) and jamal (beauty) are analogous to yang and yin of Chinese writings, while God matches the eternal Tao ("Way").

To manifest both His yang/jamal and His yin/jalal attributes visibly, God creates within the cosmos and human nature paired relations of yang-yin, jalal-jamal: heaven and earth, intellect and soul (both universal and in each person), spirit and nature, men and women. The productivity and fertility of these pairs is the sign of God's own abundance overflowing from His majesty and beauty. Things in the cosmos manifest these relations naturally, but human beings, having freedom, frequently damage these relation, with the yin elements rebelling against the yang and the yang elements forgetting their yin relation to God and tyrannizing over the yin.

As the creator and governor of all, God is primarily experienced by His creation naturally as powerful, active, and bright, i.e. jalal or yang. As a result God cannot normally be experienced by His creation but as a He, that is to say as manifesting yang/jalal attributes. Yet Sufi writers also recognize that God's Essence, apart from its relation with the cosmos, is like the true Tao mysterious, dark, and hidden from the sight and is thus in an absolute sense feminine. Yet such an understanding of God's yin/jamal nature must always be an esoteric understanding, compared to the exoteric understanding of God as yang/jalal.

Murata points out that the real enemy of this view of gender is not so much feminism (although feminism is certainly hostile to it), but the purely materialist vision of natural science. Materialism inquire only into mechanism, sees the cosmos and humanity as purposeless, and rejects the correlative thinking that sees the world around and inside us as keys to knowing God. Science has given us so much new knowledge about creation, yet we have not yet made sense of it as God's creation, demonstrating His attributes.

As Murata acknowledges, Islam's gendered cosmology is only one, albeit strikingly clear and articulate, contribution in the long tradition of spiritual cosmology. Murata compares Islamic cosmology to the Tao but her treatment of "Taoism" is the weakest part of the book. Her main source for "Taoism" is a superficial reading of the Yijing (I ching), but the Yijing is quite as much Confucian as it is Taoist, if not more (see the twelfth-century Neo-Confucian anthology "Reflections on Things at Hand" translated by Hok-lam Chan). Murata adheres closely to the ABC rule for modern spiritual writers ("anything but Christianity"), but the Christian readers will find in this book thought-provoking parallels to the several pairs of creation (light-dark, dry-wet, man-woman etc.) in Genesis 1, the feminine Wisdom as God's instrument in creation in Proverbs 8, the divine-human marriage language in Psalm 45 and Ephesians 5, and the structuring duality of works (jalal/yang) and grace (jamal/yin), Law and Gospel, Moses and Christ in St. Paul's epistles and St. John's gospel. Those involved in the debates over gender and sexuality now wracking parts of the Christian church will find Murata's book a powerful reminder that gender is not something under human control that we can remake as we wish--instead human gender is only one reflection of the fundamentally gendered fabric of the cosmos, itself made by God.
Hurus
Murata has accomplished a formidable feat by pooling together sources from both the sunni and shiah perspectives in order to present an overview of the Islamic perception of gender. By doing so she has done more justice to the multi-faceted Islamic tradition than most scholarly works that deal with the subject at hand. Her sunni sources are largely drawn from the sufic or mystical sunni-Islamic dimension, which in many respects stands parallel to shiaism, not because of a "borrowing" of one from the other as a historicist approach is forced to presume by its very premises, but rather because both sufism and shiahism tap into the same Prophetic Reality. Considering that sufism is the interior spiritual sap that gives life to the exterior bark of sunni-Islam, and that shiasm is an exteriorized Islamic spiritualism, the link between these two worldviews -- the sufic and shiite -- becomes clear. Hence Murata's employment of both sources.
As Murata shows, Islamic cosmology perceives sexual differentiation of the genders as a cosmic polarity compirising of a yin/yang interplay of opppostes. The Divine "faces" are both feminine and masculine.
Murata's work is already begining to exert its weight in Islamic studies departement's across Europe and North America. The book is sure to go a long way in reshaping the dominant views of Islam as an inherently mysogynistic religion.
Hurus
Murata has accomplished a formidable feat by pooling together sources from both the sunni and shiah perspectives in order to present an overview of the Islamic perception of gender. By doing so she has done more justice to the multi-faceted Islamic tradition than most scholarly works that deal with the subject at hand. Her sunni sources are largely drawn from the sufic or mystical sunni-Islamic dimension, which in many respects stands parallel to shiaism, not because of a "borrowing" of one from the other as a historicist approach is forced to presume by its very premises, but rather because both sufism and shiahism tap into the same Prophetic Reality. Considering that sufism is the interior spiritual sap that gives life to the exterior bark of sunni-Islam, and that shiasm is an exteriorized Islamic spiritualism, the link between these two worldviews -- the sufic and shiite -- becomes clear. Hence Murata's employment of both sources.
As Murata shows, Islamic cosmology perceives sexual differentiation of the genders as a cosmic polarity compirising of a yin/yang interplay of opppostes. The Divine "faces" are both feminine and masculine.
Murata's work is already begining to exert its weight in Islamic studies departement's across Europe and North America. The book is sure to go a long way in reshaping the dominant views of Islam as an inherently mysogynistic religion.
Zetadda
This is a dense and challenging read, not for beginners, but it's a nice perspective shift and well worth reading.
Zetadda
This is a dense and challenging read, not for beginners, but it's a nice perspective shift and well worth reading.
Ber
The Tao of Islam is not an easy read, but is a must for any Taoist who's interested in Islamic philosophy, any Muslim who's interested in Taoism, or any student of comparitive religion and philosophy. Although Islam and Taoism seem poles apart, the author makes a detailed analysis of Islamic philosophers, particularly Ibn al-Arabi, to show that despite the cultural differences, many of the basic principles are the same in both philosophies.
Ber
The Tao of Islam is not an easy read, but is a must for any Taoist who's interested in Islamic philosophy, any Muslim who's interested in Taoism, or any student of comparitive religion and philosophy. Although Islam and Taoism seem poles apart, the author makes a detailed analysis of Islamic philosophers, particularly Ibn al-Arabi, to show that despite the cultural differences, many of the basic principles are the same in both philosophies.
Aedem
A very fine book on Islam. This book is a must, not only for those who aren't Moslem and want something more than a tabloid introduction to Islam and its view on women, but more importantly for Moslems who seem to be so disconnect and ignorant of their own religion. I am a Moslem and have never heard or seen anything as deep and as enlightening as this book. Every Moslem woman should read this book.
Aedem
A very fine book on Islam. This book is a must, not only for those who aren't Moslem and want something more than a tabloid introduction to Islam and its view on women, but more importantly for Moslems who seem to be so disconnect and ignorant of their own religion. I am a Moslem and have never heard or seen anything as deep and as enlightening as this book. Every Moslem woman should read this book.
Olwado
Author has extensively studied the esoteric aspect of Islam and Mysticism. Must read for everyone who wants to understand essence of Islam.
Olwado
Author has extensively studied the esoteric aspect of Islam and Mysticism. Must read for everyone who wants to understand essence of Islam.