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VAN GOGH TO KANDINSKY Symbolist Landscape in Europe 1880-1910 epub download


Symbolism emerged in Europe after Impressionism as artists developed a more imaginative and emotional response to the .

Symbolism emerged in Europe after Impressionism as artists developed a more imaginative and emotional response to the world around them – a route which took them from Naturalism to the edges of Abstraction. It focused on the leading artists of the time such as Paul Gauguin, Vincent Van Gogh and Edvard Munch but also introduced a group of less well-known artists from Scandinavia and elsewhere in Europe.

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Van Gogh was the father of expressionism, Kandinsky the pioneer of abstraction.

Appropriately Van Gogh and Kandinsky make the perfect bookends to the . Kandinsky emerged from Russia as the leading innovator to this effect. The book/catalogue, 207pp.

Appropriately Van Gogh and Kandinsky make the perfect bookends to the show: what could be more symbolically explicit here than the former's small but dramatic The Sower, (1888) and the latter's evocative Murnau with Church, (1910) and Mountain (1909).

This book focuses on major artists of the avant-garde such as Gauguin, Van Gogh, Munch, Mondrian and Kandinsky, and also showcases other inventive artists from throughout Europe such as Hammershøi, Hodler, Khnopff and Gallen-Kallela, who are set alongside the visionary British.

This book focuses on major artists of the avant-garde such as Gauguin, Van Gogh, Munch, Mondrian and Kandinsky, and also showcases other inventive artists from throughout Europe such as Hammershøi, Hodler, Khnopff and Gallen-Kallela, who are set alongside the visionary British artistry of Crane, Leighton, Watts and Millais.

Indeed many of the names in the tremendous Van Gogh to Kandinsky: Symbolist Landscape in Europe 1880-1910 may be unfamiliar, since symbolist art of any sort has had mixed fortunes, and symbolist landscapes in particular. More than a hundred paintings have been borrowed from museums across Europe, including masterpieces by Van Gogh, Munch, Arnold Böcklin, August Strindberg and James Ensor, and the mood plunges and soars by the room.

Van Gogh, Munch, Mondrian and Kandinsky, and also showcases other inventive artists from throughout Europe such. by acknowledged experts in the field providing a new chapter in the history of landscape painting.

This catalogue accompanies the first exhibition dedicated to landscapes by the Symbolists, the innovative movement whose artists took imaginative and emotional approaches to painting and embraced themes such as music, nationalism, science and modernity. The book focuses on major artists of the avant-garde such as Gauguin, Van Gogh, Munch, Mondrian and Kandinsky, and also showcases other inventive artists from throughout Europe such.

The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised A groundbreaking collaboration between the National Galleries of Scotland, the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam and the Finnish National Gallery, this catalogue.

The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. A groundbreaking collaboration between the National Galleries of Scotland, the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam and the Finnish National Gallery, this catalogue accompanies the first exhibition dedicated to landscapes by the Symbolists, the innovative movement whose artists took a more imaginative and emotional approach to painting and embraced themes such as music, nationalism, science and modernity.

A revelatory collection of Symbolist landscapes by Gauguin, van Gogh, Munch, Mondrian, Kandinsky .

A revelatory collection of Symbolist landscapes by Gauguin, van Gogh, Munch, Mondrian, Kandinsky, Strindberg. The writers are all acknowledged authorities in their fields, and topics treated include the ways that landscape can be constructed to resonate with emotional states; the dream world that many artists created to reflect the insights of the new psychological schools; the alignment of the rhythms of nature and those of music (quite consciously explored by a number of these artists); the interest.

VAN GOGH TO KANDINSKY Symbolist Landscape in Europe 1880-1910 epub download

ISBN13: 978-1906270544

ISBN: 1906270546

Category: No category

Language: English

Publisher: National Galleries of Scotland (2012)

ePUB size: 1290 kb

FB2 size: 1209 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 902

Other Formats: mbr docx lrf mobi

Related to VAN GOGH TO KANDINSKY Symbolist Landscape in Europe 1880-1910 ePub books

YSOP
This volume accompanied the exhibition of symbolist landscapes at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam from February to June 2012, the Scottish National Gallery in Edinburgh from July to October 2012, and the Ateneum Art Museum in Helsinki from November 2012 until January 2013. Given the huge popularity of symbolism as a method and of landscape as a subject, it is surprising that this is apparently the first major exhibition to be devoted to the way in which they came together around the turn of the last century. The broadly international appeal of that convergence is witnessed by the widely eclectic nature of the exhibition, to which over fifty lenders from sixteen European countries contributed images. The images exhibited, as well as the title given to the show, differed somewhat according to venue, and the checklist of the exhibition notes that some of the pieces in the show are not illustrated in the catalogue. Be that as it may, the catalogue as printed is a wonderful compendium of beautiful reproductions and intelligent, informative commentary. The artists encompassed range from the well known (Van Gogh, Gauguin, Munch, Kandinsky, et. al.) to less familiar figures like the Lithuanian Ciurlionis and the German Albert Trachsel. Although Symbolism was generally French and Belgian in origin, it quickly exerted broad international influence, and the curators have done an excellent job in representing artists from less well known national traditions in Scandinavia and Eastern Europe.

The book is not divided into separate sections of text and catalogue; rather, the reproductions are arranged in the order in which they are discussed in seven broadly thematic essays. The writers are all acknowledged authorities in their fields, and topics treated include the ways that landscape can be constructed to resonate with emotional states; the dream world that many artists created to reflect the insights of the new psychological schools; the alignment of the rhythms of nature and those of music (quite consciously explored by a number of these artists); the interest of many of them, especially the Eastern Europeans, in theosophy; etc. One gets a good sense of the historical development of landscape in the latter half of the nineteenth century, from naturalism to symbolism; it is noteworthy that most of the artists discussed underwent a naturalist phase in their early careers. And it is quite surprising how much art in the years under discussion can be broadly designated as landscape: much of what we see in books and museums is not really classifiable according to the categories in general use today, but the book makes clear that it did constitute landscape in the collective consciousness of the time. It is just not landscape as we know it from, say, the Barbizon school; what unites the artists in the exhibition is their increasing recognition that painting implies less an obligation to recreate the appearance of the physical world than an invitation to use color and shape to explore conditions and states of mind that surpass the material. And since landscape surrounds us, it is the most ubiquitous template for such an exploration. One can see that the implications and resonances of landscape and symbolism are hugely expansive and that no single book can tell the whole story. This is an excellent beginning, though; apart from the informative essays, the book is lavishly illustrated with 129 reproductions--not all full-page, but always large enough to be fully legible and in excellent color and clarity (some are quite stunning--this is a Thames and Hudson book and benefits from that publisher's usual high production values). The volume concludes with a selected bibliography, capsule biographies of the artists (nice, but maybe not really necessary in an age of universal internet access), and an index of names. My reluctance to award five stars comes from the tendency of some of the writers, apparently desiring to cover as much territory as possible, to substitute a kind of cataloguing of names and places for deeper analysis and discussion--not a big quibble, though, especially in light of the fact that this seems to be the only book of its kind. Highly recommended.
YSOP
This volume accompanied the exhibition of symbolist landscapes at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam from February to June 2012, the Scottish National Gallery in Edinburgh from July to October 2012, and the Ateneum Art Museum in Helsinki from November 2012 until January 2013. Given the huge popularity of symbolism as a method and of landscape as a subject, it is surprising that this is apparently the first major exhibition to be devoted to the way in which they came together around the turn of the last century. The broadly international appeal of that convergence is witnessed by the widely eclectic nature of the exhibition, to which over fifty lenders from sixteen European countries contributed images. The images exhibited, as well as the title given to the show, differed somewhat according to venue, and the checklist of the exhibition notes that some of the pieces in the show are not illustrated in the catalogue. Be that as it may, the catalogue as printed is a wonderful compendium of beautiful reproductions and intelligent, informative commentary. The artists encompassed range from the well known (Van Gogh, Gauguin, Munch, Kandinsky, et. al.) to less familiar figures like the Lithuanian Ciurlionis and the German Albert Trachsel. Although Symbolism was generally French and Belgian in origin, it quickly exerted broad international influence, and the curators have done an excellent job in representing artists from less well known national traditions in Scandinavia and Eastern Europe.

The book is not divided into separate sections of text and catalogue; rather, the reproductions are arranged in the order in which they are discussed in seven broadly thematic essays. The writers are all acknowledged authorities in their fields, and topics treated include the ways that landscape can be constructed to resonate with emotional states; the dream world that many artists created to reflect the insights of the new psychological schools; the alignment of the rhythms of nature and those of music (quite consciously explored by a number of these artists); the interest of many of them, especially the Eastern Europeans, in theosophy; etc. One gets a good sense of the historical development of landscape in the latter half of the nineteenth century, from naturalism to symbolism; it is noteworthy that most of the artists discussed underwent a naturalist phase in their early careers. And it is quite surprising how much art in the years under discussion can be broadly designated as landscape: much of what we see in books and museums is not really classifiable according to the categories in general use today, but the book makes clear that it did constitute landscape in the collective consciousness of the time. It is just not landscape as we know it from, say, the Barbizon school; what unites the artists in the exhibition is their increasing recognition that painting implies less an obligation to recreate the appearance of the physical world than an invitation to use color and shape to explore conditions and states of mind that surpass the material. And since landscape surrounds us, it is the most ubiquitous template for such an exploration. One can see that the implications and resonances of landscape and symbolism are hugely expansive and that no single book can tell the whole story. This is an excellent beginning, though; apart from the informative essays, the book is lavishly illustrated with 129 reproductions--not all full-page, but always large enough to be fully legible and in excellent color and clarity (some are quite stunning--this is a Thames and Hudson book and benefits from that publisher's usual high production values). The volume concludes with a selected bibliography, capsule biographies of the artists (nice, but maybe not really necessary in an age of universal internet access), and an index of names. My reluctance to award five stars comes from the tendency of some of the writers, apparently desiring to cover as much territory as possible, to substitute a kind of cataloguing of names and places for deeper analysis and discussion--not a big quibble, though, especially in light of the fact that this seems to be the only book of its kind. Highly recommended.
Wrathmaster
Really superior book on this period of art. Selected illustrations very good. Well done.
Wrathmaster
Really superior book on this period of art. Selected illustrations very good. Well done.
Aurizar
History was mentioned as a style of painting portraying events that shaped cultural outlooks. Art flopped mysteriously into landscapes fading out with no human beings rushing frantically into walls of exhaustion. People with too much money could buy gut wrenching nights the artist celebrates.
Aurizar
History was mentioned as a style of painting portraying events that shaped cultural outlooks. Art flopped mysteriously into landscapes fading out with no human beings rushing frantically into walls of exhaustion. People with too much money could buy gut wrenching nights the artist celebrates.