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How War Came: Immediate Origins of the 2nd World War epub download

by Donald Cameron Watt


Watt's "How War Came" focuses from the time of the Munich agreement (Sept. 1) Regarding the diplomatic maneuverings preceding World War II, Watt's book probably gives more information than any other single source. Much of it is interesting.

Watt's "How War Came" focuses from the time of the Munich agreement (Sept. 30, 1938) to the time that both Britain and France declare war (Sept. Unfortunately much of it is barely interesting, or uninteresting. I did much rereading.

In this book the author focuses on the 11 months following the Munich conference in September 1938, and chronicles the events that led to world war. His approach is through the eyes of the leaders of all the powers involved, drawing on official records, private papers. His approach is through the eyes of the leaders of all the powers involved, drawing on official records, private papers, reminiscences and biographies of the politicians, soldiers, diplomatists and others who took part in the processes which led to war.

Donald Cameron Watt was Professor of International History at the London School of Economics, where he served as the Head of the Department and Stevenson Chair of International History from 1981 to 1993. Books by Donald Cameron Watt. Mor. rivia About How War Came History is lived through and, for the fortunate, survived by people.

Donald Cameron Watt was a chorister in the Choir of King's College, Cambridge, and then was educated at Rugby School. How War Came: The Immediate Origins of the Second World War, 1938-1939. New York: Pantheon Books.

Donald Cameron Watt was a chorister in the Choir of King's College, Cambridge, and then was educated at Rugby School Career  .

His approach is through the eyes of the leaders of all the powers involved, drawing on official records, private papers, reminiscences and biographies of the politicians, soldiers, diplomatists and others who took part in the In this book the author focuses on the 11 months following the Munich conference in September 1938, and chronicles the events that led to world war.

My relationship with How War Came began in 1989. The New York Times hailed it as one of the best books of 1989, and it also won the prestigious Wolfson History Prize. I was a wide-eyed history postgraduate at the University of Toronto. And war came not because the prime minister encouraged the Nazi dictator by appeasing him, but because Hitler, cheated out of the small war he wanted against Czechoslovakia in 1938 by Chamberlain's diplomacy, was determined to have war in 1939. Of Hitler's drive towards war, Watt concludes, "neither firmness nor appeasement, the piling up of more armaments, nor the demonstration of more determination would stop him".

April 5, 2014 History. found in the catalog. Are you sure you want to remove How War Came, The Immediate Origins of the Second World War 1938-1939 from your list? How War Came, The Immediate Origins of the Second World War 1938-1939. by Donald Cameron Watt. Published August 29, 1990 by Pantheon. show more.

Simon & Schuster, reprinted 1996) Donald Cameron Watt, How War Came: The Immediate Origins of the Second World War, 1938-1939 (Pantheon, 1989) Gerhard Weinberg, The Foreign Policy of Hitler s Germany, 2 vols. Leni Yahil, The Rescue of Danish Jewry: Test of a Democracy (Jewish Publication Society, 1969).

Watt, Donald Cameron (1975). Too Serious a Business: European Armed Forces and the Approach to the Second World War. Berkeley, California: University of California Press. Watt, Donald Cameron (1984). Succeeding John Bull: America in Britain's Place, 1900-1975: A Study of the Anglo-American Relationship and World Politics in the Context of British and American Foreign Policy-Making in the Twentieth Century. Cambridge University Press.

How War Came: Immediate Origins of the 2nd World War epub download

ISBN13: 978-0517057179

ISBN: 0517057174

Author: Donald Cameron Watt

Category: No category

Language: English

Publisher: Random House Value Publishing (October 13, 1990)

ePUB size: 1691 kb

FB2 size: 1342 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 745

Other Formats: lrf rtf lrf lit

Related to How War Came: Immediate Origins of the 2nd World War ePub books

elektron
Having read Watt's book years ago, I still return to it for inspiration and insight. Watt's opening chapter "May 1945: Europe's End," is a stylistic tour de force of understatement in its depiction of the ghastly human and material catastrophe that had just ended. The penultimate chapter "September 3: The British Ultimatum" concludes in an equally gripping way.

I have also read Watt's --Too Serious a Business--, a brilliant account of the status of the military forces in Europe in the years between the two world wars. I would highly recommend it as well
elektron
Having read Watt's book years ago, I still return to it for inspiration and insight. Watt's opening chapter "May 1945: Europe's End," is a stylistic tour de force of understatement in its depiction of the ghastly human and material catastrophe that had just ended. The penultimate chapter "September 3: The British Ultimatum" concludes in an equally gripping way.

I have also read Watt's --Too Serious a Business--, a brilliant account of the status of the military forces in Europe in the years between the two world wars. I would highly recommend it as well
Quphagie
Churchill's "The Gathering Storm" covers pre-World War II events from the end of World War I to the ascension of Churchill to Prime Minister in 1940. Watt's "How War Came" focuses from the time of the Munich agreement (Sept. 30, 1938) to the time that both Britain and France declare war (Sept. 3, 1939). But despite its narrower focus of time, the information is more in depth.

624 pages of chronological narrative include many anecdotes and a horde of diplomatic characters with photos of many, though not all. The conscientious reader will take advantage of the good index. Most of the important characters are listed with a brief note of their positions. Political cartoons of the era add occasional color. The maps are welcome, though many locations noted in the narrative are not on them. Readers demanding sources of information will be pleased with fifty-one pages of footnotes and thirty-two pages of bibliography and credits.

Maybe what pleased me most was Professor Watt's unabashed criticisms of the characters. The Prime Minister of Britain, the President of the U.S., the Tyrant of Nazi Germany and his subordinates - all get a good whacking. But Watt is capable of commendation too.

About twenty years have passed since my reading of "The Gathering Storm", but I remember it as more exciting than "How War Came". For two reasons:

1) Regarding the diplomatic maneuverings preceding World War II, Watt's book probably gives more information than any other single source. Much of it is interesting. Unfortunately much of it is barely interesting, or uninteresting.

2) What drags Watt's book down to a three-star rating is his addiction to long sentences, which are sometimes too hard to understand. I did much rereading.

To get to the book's more interesting parts, and to trudge through the less-interesting parts and the long sentences, the reader will need to flex his reading muscles.

Here is an example of Watt's poor sentences (take a deep breath before diving in):

British society retained a sense of national identity, a grasp of the priorities necessary for the maintenance of national unity, a common set of symbols of that unity--king, parliament, flag--and a consciousness of Englishness, Welshness, Scottishness reinforced by more local ties of identification; these were to give Britain a sense of social cohesion, a level of social discipline, a feeling of singleminded purpose which were to make possible a degree of mobilization of the national resources in manpower and money which, for all the technological backwardness, out-dated managerial and labour practices and grievances that historians now maintain accompanied this mobilization in Britain, Germany was only to achieve after D-Day.

May 19, 2010:
I have just finished re-reading Winston Churchill's "The Gathering Storm." I have written an amazon review of it that compares it with "How War Came."
Quphagie
Churchill's "The Gathering Storm" covers pre-World War II events from the end of World War I to the ascension of Churchill to Prime Minister in 1940. Watt's "How War Came" focuses from the time of the Munich agreement (Sept. 30, 1938) to the time that both Britain and France declare war (Sept. 3, 1939). But despite its narrower focus of time, the information is more in depth.

624 pages of chronological narrative include many anecdotes and a horde of diplomatic characters with photos of many, though not all. The conscientious reader will take advantage of the good index. Most of the important characters are listed with a brief note of their positions. Political cartoons of the era add occasional color. The maps are welcome, though many locations noted in the narrative are not on them. Readers demanding sources of information will be pleased with fifty-one pages of footnotes and thirty-two pages of bibliography and credits.

Maybe what pleased me most was Professor Watt's unabashed criticisms of the characters. The Prime Minister of Britain, the President of the U.S., the Tyrant of Nazi Germany and his subordinates - all get a good whacking. But Watt is capable of commendation too.

About twenty years have passed since my reading of "The Gathering Storm", but I remember it as more exciting than "How War Came". For two reasons:

1) Regarding the diplomatic maneuverings preceding World War II, Watt's book probably gives more information than any other single source. Much of it is interesting. Unfortunately much of it is barely interesting, or uninteresting.

2) What drags Watt's book down to a three-star rating is his addiction to long sentences, which are sometimes too hard to understand. I did much rereading.

To get to the book's more interesting parts, and to trudge through the less-interesting parts and the long sentences, the reader will need to flex his reading muscles.

Here is an example of Watt's poor sentences (take a deep breath before diving in):

British society retained a sense of national identity, a grasp of the priorities necessary for the maintenance of national unity, a common set of symbols of that unity--king, parliament, flag--and a consciousness of Englishness, Welshness, Scottishness reinforced by more local ties of identification; these were to give Britain a sense of social cohesion, a level of social discipline, a feeling of singleminded purpose which were to make possible a degree of mobilization of the national resources in manpower and money which, for all the technological backwardness, out-dated managerial and labour practices and grievances that historians now maintain accompanied this mobilization in Britain, Germany was only to achieve after D-Day.

May 19, 2010:
I have just finished re-reading Winston Churchill's "The Gathering Storm." I have written an amazon review of it that compares it with "How War Came."
Thetath
An exhaustive account of the months leading up to the beginning of the Second World War in September 1939. The author seems to have read everything available about the diplomatic posturing and intrigues among the major powers. However his writing style is abominable; meandering sentences densely infested with long parallel constructions and multiple dependent clauses. Often I had to re-read two or three times to figure out the subject of a sentence. Perhaps this ornate and pompous style is required in the halls of academe.

The material within a chapter is often poorly organized. In the midst of a detailed account of day-to-day events will be a choice nugget of information, revealing the intent of some government policy, or piecing together events to construct a strategic view. A short overview at the beginning of each chapter, to indicate the political and military shifts to be covered, could help immensely, giving the reader a framework in which to locate the immense wealth of detail narrated for each week (or even day) leading up to the actual declaration of war.
Thetath
An exhaustive account of the months leading up to the beginning of the Second World War in September 1939. The author seems to have read everything available about the diplomatic posturing and intrigues among the major powers. However his writing style is abominable; meandering sentences densely infested with long parallel constructions and multiple dependent clauses. Often I had to re-read two or three times to figure out the subject of a sentence. Perhaps this ornate and pompous style is required in the halls of academe.

The material within a chapter is often poorly organized. In the midst of a detailed account of day-to-day events will be a choice nugget of information, revealing the intent of some government policy, or piecing together events to construct a strategic view. A short overview at the beginning of each chapter, to indicate the political and military shifts to be covered, could help immensely, giving the reader a framework in which to locate the immense wealth of detail narrated for each week (or even day) leading up to the actual declaration of war.
Agantrius
I add a 5th star to the other positive reviews to underscore their well considered evaluations of this very well-documented, superb diplomatic history. It is destined to be a classic study, one dense with subtle insights in its exploration of interconnected global diplomacy of this the critical biennial verging to a World War.

There is not any better time to read this book than -- today -- during the Ukrainian Crisis. It will render an illuminating comprehension of today's political and military strategies that current journalists elide.
Agantrius
I add a 5th star to the other positive reviews to underscore their well considered evaluations of this very well-documented, superb diplomatic history. It is destined to be a classic study, one dense with subtle insights in its exploration of interconnected global diplomacy of this the critical biennial verging to a World War.

There is not any better time to read this book than -- today -- during the Ukrainian Crisis. It will render an illuminating comprehension of today's political and military strategies that current journalists elide.
Muniath
"How War Came" covers the period roughly from Europe to the beginning of World War II. Of course, the key actor in this period was Hitler; it was his will, more than any other factor, that caused the war to start.
Of course, no one at the time knew that at the time, and this book accounts the diplomatic efforts made by the Britain, France and others to avoid the War. This provides a useful perspective on the history of the time, which tends to focus exclusively on Hitler. Watt has thoroughly researched this period, and provides information that even those who are well-read in the events leading up to the war will learn much from this book.
Muniath
"How War Came" covers the period roughly from Europe to the beginning of World War II. Of course, the key actor in this period was Hitler; it was his will, more than any other factor, that caused the war to start.
Of course, no one at the time knew that at the time, and this book accounts the diplomatic efforts made by the Britain, France and others to avoid the War. This provides a useful perspective on the history of the time, which tends to focus exclusively on Hitler. Watt has thoroughly researched this period, and provides information that even those who are well-read in the events leading up to the war will learn much from this book.
Beazerdred
This book tells of the time between Munich and the declaration of war on Sept. 3, 1939. It is very well done, and the final chapters are dramatic and attention-holding. The author is English, and some of his comments on American politics are not very insightful, but I liked the book and found it well woth reading, even if it is 11 years old.
Beazerdred
This book tells of the time between Munich and the declaration of war on Sept. 3, 1939. It is very well done, and the final chapters are dramatic and attention-holding. The author is English, and some of his comments on American politics are not very insightful, but I liked the book and found it well woth reading, even if it is 11 years old.