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Sheridan: The Life And Wars Of General Phil Sheridan epub download

by Roy Morris Jr.


The story of Sheridan's Civil War is excellent, but uinfortunately he lived a long & boring life afterwards.

The story of Sheridan's Civil War is excellent, but uinfortunately he lived a long & boring life afterwards. Better mounted, armed and supplied, Sheridan defeats Jeb Stuart in detail and kills him at Yellow Tavern. Covering Grant's crossing of the James, Sheridan performs so well, Lee completely loses track of Grant during this operation.

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A serviceable biography of General Phil Sheridan, the short, profane, and very aggressive Union general. This book traces his career, from his youth to his checkered career at West Point to his service in the Army

A serviceable biography of General Phil Sheridan, the short, profane, and very aggressive Union general. This book traces his career, from his youth to his checkered career at West Point to his service in the Army. In the Civil War, his first command was as an infantry officer. When Grant went east, he requested that Sheridan take command of the cavalry of the Army of the Potomac. And, here, Sheridan sparkled. When the Army of A serviceable biography of General Phil Sheridan, the short, profane, and very aggressive Union general.

Army General Phil Sheridan never lost a battle. Against Confederate armies and Indian warriors, he engaged the enemy with a ferocity that forever ended any notions Americans had about war being a chivalrous enterprise

Army General Phil Sheridan never lost a battle. Against Confederate armies and Indian warriors, he engaged the enemy with a ferocity that forever ended any notions Americans had about war being a chivalrous enterprise. This is the first truly definitive biography of Little Phil, one of the most effective and controversial soldiers in America's history. Two 8-page inserts; 4 maps.

He was short, foul-mouthed, and so constitutionally pugnacious that he once thrashed a Southern train conductor who treated him rudely. He rose from the undistinguished rank of quartermaster to command the Union cavalry at the battles of Yellow Tavern (where he defeated his flamboyant rebel counterpart, . Stuart) and Winchester.

General Philip H. Sheridan, who saved Chicago 3 times. Morris, Roy, J. Sheridan: The Life and Wars of General Phil Sheridan, Crown Publishing, 1992, ISBN 0-517-58070-5. The 1996 book The Great Fire by Jim Murphy tells the story of the fire for children, and was a Newbery Honor book in 1996  .

Sheridan was a very flawed human being but he was a superb general able to see a very broad scene in battle, and then drive for the weakness

Sheridan was a very flawed human being but he was a superb general able to see a very broad scene in battle, and then drive for the weakness. Politically, he was far less successful but with Grant backing him, he seems to have ignored his readily apparent weaknesses. I was struck by how he brought Lee to the finish with skillful actions.

And when the Civil War was over, General Phil Sheridan continued to fight, whether that meant plunging into the bloody and byzantine politics of Reconstruction Louisiana or managing the inglorious war against the Plains Indians

And when the Civil War was over, General Phil Sheridan continued to fight, whether that meant plunging into the bloody and byzantine politics of Reconstruction Louisiana or managing the inglorious war against the Plains Indians. This outstanding biography restores Sheridan to his place in American military history; examines his relationships with contemporaries like Grant, Sherman, and his ill-fated subordinate George Armstrong Custer, and makes the momentous age he lived in come back to life.

Morris, Roy, Jr. Sheridan: The Life and Wars of General Phil Sheridan. New York: Crown Publishing, 1992

Morris, Roy, Jr. New York: Crown Publishing, 1992. Fredriksen, John . "Philip Henry Sheridan", Encyclopedia of the American Civil War: A Political, Social, and Military History, Heidler, David . and Heidler, Jeanne . ed. W. Norton & Company, 2000, ISBN 0-393-04758-X. Hess, Earl . Civil War Campaign in the West, University of North Carolina Press, 1992, ISBN 0-8078-2042-3. Hutton, Paul Andrew, Phil Sheridan and His Army, University of Nebraska Press, 1985, ISBN 0-8032-7227-8.

Roy Morris, J. is the author of The Better Angel: Walt Whitman in the Civil War; Ambrose Bierce: Alone in Bad Company; and Sheridan: The Life and Wars of General Phil Sheridan. A former political correspondent, he lives in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Библиографические данные. Fraud of the Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and the Stolen Election of 1876.

A biography of the U.S. Army General describes Sheridan's role in such Civil War battles as Perryville, Yellow Tavern, and Five Forks, and his experiences in the post-war period. 15,000 first printing.

Sheridan: The Life And Wars Of General Phil Sheridan epub download

ISBN13: 978-0517580707

ISBN: 0517580705

Author: Roy Morris Jr.

Category: No category

Language: English

Publisher: Crown; 1st edition (April 14, 1992)

Pages: 464 pages

ePUB size: 1948 kb

FB2 size: 1951 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 469

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Related to Sheridan: The Life And Wars Of General Phil Sheridan ePub books

Doomblade
A very good book on strategy applied to a war in which much decision making was haphazard - get there first with more men was borrowed from the rebels and applied with better preparation and a willingness to alter plans to suit the terrain and the circumstances. It was Sheridan who destroyed layer after layer of Lee's forces which made surrender the only option.
Doomblade
A very good book on strategy applied to a war in which much decision making was haphazard - get there first with more men was borrowed from the rebels and applied with better preparation and a willingness to alter plans to suit the terrain and the circumstances. It was Sheridan who destroyed layer after layer of Lee's forces which made surrender the only option.
Trex
Great book, great condition
Trex
Great book, great condition
Seevinev
I did not want to put it down.It has just the right amount of detail to keep it interesting.
Seevinev
I did not want to put it down.It has just the right amount of detail to keep it interesting.
Tejar
The story of Sheridan's Civil War is excellent, but uinfortunately he lived a long
& boring life afterwards. Quite tedious.
Tejar
The story of Sheridan's Civil War is excellent, but uinfortunately he lived a long
& boring life afterwards. Quite tedious.
Alianyau
Condition of the book received was as advertised. Book has met all my expectations.
Alianyau
Condition of the book received was as advertised. Book has met all my expectations.
Gralinda
V good
Gralinda
V good
Cala
The biography is well written, almost novel-like in its action. The problem, however, is on page 37 where Morris describes a Native American Oregon woman (Sidnayoh) as Sheridan's Indian companion (i.e., lover). With my research I determined that this is impossible. There is only one native Sidnayoh (actual spelling Sidnayah), an 8-year old Klickitat Indian girl, who died of smallpox in 1847. Sheridan did not arrive in Oregon until 1856, nine years after Sidnayah's death. Although I (Wayne Kigerl) notified Morris and his agency that he should delete his untrue tale (and Sidnayah's burden) of being Sheridan's lover, Morris has not responded, nor corrected the book. Others, James Donovan, for example, author of--A Terrible Glory, Custer and the Little Bighorn--agree with me. Any googling of Sidnayah will bring you to my research.
Cala
The biography is well written, almost novel-like in its action. The problem, however, is on page 37 where Morris describes a Native American Oregon woman (Sidnayoh) as Sheridan's Indian companion (i.e., lover). With my research I determined that this is impossible. There is only one native Sidnayoh (actual spelling Sidnayah), an 8-year old Klickitat Indian girl, who died of smallpox in 1847. Sheridan did not arrive in Oregon until 1856, nine years after Sidnayah's death. Although I (Wayne Kigerl) notified Morris and his agency that he should delete his untrue tale (and Sidnayah's burden) of being Sheridan's lover, Morris has not responded, nor corrected the book. Others, James Donovan, for example, author of--A Terrible Glory, Custer and the Little Bighorn--agree with me. Any googling of Sidnayah will bring you to my research.
Philip Sheridan's life was a whirlwind. He came to Sam Grant's attention in northern Mississippi, early in the Civil War, long before Grant took Vicksburg, and came back into Grant's life during the Union assault on Missionary Ridge during the Chattanooga campaign. After Sheridan's exemplary performance at Chattanooga, Grant became his mentor understanding that in Sheridan he had a battering ram whose temperament fitted his own as far as waging war was concerned. Along with Sherman, these men favored total, unrelenting war to subjugate the Confederacy.

Transferring east to the Army of the Potomac, Grant places Sheridan in charge of the Federal cavalry at a time when this arm of the Army was coming into its own. Sheridan moulds it into a most efficient weapon of war and with Grant's help is able to delink it from George Meade. Available at last as an integrated mounted unit, the Union cavalry under Sheridan finally functions as effectively as its Confederate counterpart. Better mounted, armed and supplied, Sheridan defeats Jeb Stuart in detail and kills him at Yellow Tavern. Covering Grant's crossing of the James, Sheridan performs so well, Lee completely loses track of Grant during this operation.

When Lee dispatches Jubal Early for his famed raid on Washington, Grant does the same with Sheridan with orders to hunt Early down and destroy him while at the same time, completely destroying the Shenandoah Valley, the bread basket of the Confederacy. Surprised at Cedar Creek, Sheridan rallies his troops and routes Early's army. He then completes the destruction of the valley, decimates the Virginia Central Railroad at Lynchburg and rejoins Grant at City Point. It is Sheridan who stretches Lee's lines to the breaking point by winning at Five Forks and it is Sheridan who decimates Lee again at Saylers Creek on his retreat to Appomattox. Getting ahead of Lee, it is again Sheridan who puts the cork in Lee's bottle, forcing the Confederate surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox Court House. This man was beyond pugnacious. He was an unrelenting warrior.

After the War he is responsible for reconstruction in Louisiana and Texas and gun running into Mexico as the United States seeks the ejection of France from Mexico. He is a complete failure at the first and unsurprisingly, remarkably successful at the second. Transferring west he subjugates the Indians, first the Southern Plains, and 10 years later, the Northern Plains, but periodically is moved in and out of New Orleans as reconstruction conditions there warrant. With President Hayes election in 1876, Federal occupation of the South ends and Sheridan's life begins to wind down. He is present at the Chicago Fire and performs well, maintaining peace at the request of local officials. He succeeds Grant and Sherman as head of the Army but heart trouble ultimately claims him.

He was a most remarkable, hard charging, type A personality. A thorough hater of people who crossed him, he was an equally steadfast friend of those who supported and befriended him. At the time of his death, besides homes in Washington DC and Chicago, his estate consisted of little more than $20,000. When you stop and realize his personal friends included people like Marshall Field, George Pullman and George Armour, for a leading figure of the Gilded Age his estate was eloquent testimony to his integrity. He is buried at Arlington National Cemetery, 100 yards from the entrance to Robert E. Lee's ancestral home. His wife Irene, 20+ years his junior and still a young woman at the time of his death, never remarried.

Talk about a fast paced, rapid read! Combining the life lived with the times within which it was lived, this is one of the better biographies I have had the pleasure to read.
Philip Sheridan's life was a whirlwind. He came to Sam Grant's attention in northern Mississippi, early in the Civil War, long before Grant took Vicksburg, and came back into Grant's life during the Union assault on Missionary Ridge during the Chattanooga campaign. After Sheridan's exemplary performance at Chattanooga, Grant became his mentor understanding that in Sheridan he had a battering ram whose temperament fitted his own as far as waging war was concerned. Along with Sherman, these men favored total, unrelenting war to subjugate the Confederacy.

Transferring east to the Army of the Potomac, Grant places Sheridan in charge of the Federal cavalry at a time when this arm of the Army was coming into its own. Sheridan moulds it into a most efficient weapon of war and with Grant's help is able to delink it from George Meade. Available at last as an integrated mounted unit, the Union cavalry under Sheridan finally functions as effectively as its Confederate counterpart. Better mounted, armed and supplied, Sheridan defeats Jeb Stuart in detail and kills him at Yellow Tavern. Covering Grant's crossing of the James, Sheridan performs so well, Lee completely loses track of Grant during this operation.

When Lee dispatches Jubal Early for his famed raid on Washington, Grant does the same with Sheridan with orders to hunt Early down and destroy him while at the same time, completely destroying the Shenandoah Valley, the bread basket of the Confederacy. Surprised at Cedar Creek, Sheridan rallies his troops and routes Early's army. He then completes the destruction of the valley, decimates the Virginia Central Railroad at Lynchburg and rejoins Grant at City Point. It is Sheridan who stretches Lee's lines to the breaking point by winning at Five Forks and it is Sheridan who decimates Lee again at Saylers Creek on his retreat to Appomattox. Getting ahead of Lee, it is again Sheridan who puts the cork in Lee's bottle, forcing the Confederate surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox Court House. This man was beyond pugnacious. He was an unrelenting warrior.

After the War he is responsible for reconstruction in Louisiana and Texas and gun running into Mexico as the United States seeks the ejection of France from Mexico. He is a complete failure at the first and unsurprisingly, remarkably successful at the second. Transferring west he subjugates the Indians, first the Southern Plains, and 10 years later, the Northern Plains, but periodically is moved in and out of New Orleans as reconstruction conditions there warrant. With President Hayes election in 1876, Federal occupation of the South ends and Sheridan's life begins to wind down. He is present at the Chicago Fire and performs well, maintaining peace at the request of local officials. He succeeds Grant and Sherman as head of the Army but heart trouble ultimately claims him.

He was a most remarkable, hard charging, type A personality. A thorough hater of people who crossed him, he was an equally steadfast friend of those who supported and befriended him. At the time of his death, besides homes in Washington DC and Chicago, his estate consisted of little more than $20,000. When you stop and realize his personal friends included people like Marshall Field, George Pullman and George Armour, for a leading figure of the Gilded Age his estate was eloquent testimony to his integrity. He is buried at Arlington National Cemetery, 100 yards from the entrance to Robert E. Lee's ancestral home. His wife Irene, 20+ years his junior and still a young woman at the time of his death, never remarried.

Talk about a fast paced, rapid read! Combining the life lived with the times within which it was lived, this is one of the better biographies I have had the pleasure to read.