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Complete Science Fiction Treasury of H. G. Wells epub download

by H. G. Wells,Herbert George Wells


Herbert George Wells (21 September 1866 – 13 August 1946) was an English writer.

Herbert George Wells (21 September 1866 – 13 August 1946) was an English writer. He is now best remembered for his science fiction novels and is often called the "father of science fiction", along with Jules Verne and the publisher Hugo Gernsback.

Start by marking The Complete Science Fiction Treasury of . HG Wells was way ahead of his time

Start by marking The Complete Science Fiction Treasury of . Wells as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. HG Wells was way ahead of his time. Very little that is bad in this book, except may Year of the Comet. Food of the Gods is a very well written book. Time Machine is ground-breaking. When I came across a beautiful volume of Wells’s collected science fiction (there are three additional titles that are not as well known), it was a great opportunity to properly acquaint myself with Wells.

One man though, by the name of Herbert George Wells has been considered by some to be the father of modern science fiction. com) H. G. Wells as some may call him, have had various books, and stories that has made him very famous in the great book world around the nation, as far as modern science fiction goes. Wells best know books include, The Time Machine, The Invisible Man, The War of the Worlds and The Island Of Dr. Moreau. Out of 100 Books Wells wrote fifty of them were top sellers across the United States and many parts of the world.

Wells, H. (Herbert George), 1866-1946. Science fiction, English. New York : Avenel Books : distributed by Crown Publishers. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Wells was born in Bromley, England, the son of an unsuccessful merchant. After a limited education, he was apprenticed to a dry-goods merchant, but soon found he wanted something more out of life. Many of Wells's stories are based on his own experiences. The History of Mr. Polly (1910) draws on the life of Wells's father. Kipps (1905) uses Wells's experience as an apprentice, and Love and Mr. Lewisham (1900) draws on Wells's experiences as a school teacher.

Herbert George Wells, often referred to as H. Wells, was an English writer best known for his science fiction works that gave a vision of the future

Herbert George Wells, often referred to as H. Wells, was an English writer best known for his science fiction works that gave a vision of the future. He was well-known for being proficient in many other genres as well, and had written several novels, short stories, biographies, and autobiographies. An avid reader since a very young age, he read books by Washington Irving, Charles Dickens, Jonathan Swift, Voltaire, and many other important writers of the Enlightenment period. His works were influenced by them in some way or the other.

G Wells was the son of domestic servants turned small shopkeepers.

Wells, English novelist, journalist, sociologist, and historian best known for such science fiction novels as The Time Machine, The Island of Doctor Moreau, The Invisible Man, and The War of the Worlds. Learn more about Wells’s life and accomplishments in this article. Wells was the son of domestic servants turned small shopkeepers. He grew up under the continual threat of poverty, and at age 14, after a very inadequate education supplemented by his inexhaustible love of reading, he was apprenticed to a draper in Windsor.

The English author, Herbert George Wells, also commonly referred to as the father of science fiction

The English author, Herbert George Wells, also commonly referred to as the father of science fiction. Wells was born in Bromley, Kent County, England on September 21, 1866 to Sarah Neil who worked as a maid to the upper class and Joseph Wells, a professional cricket player and a shopkeeper. The family suffered poverty and Wells’ parents did not lead a happy married life.

Herbert George Wells (1866–1946), known as H. Wells, was a prolific English writer in many genres, including .

His most notable science fiction works include The Time Machine, The Island of Doctor Moreau, The Invisible Man, and The War of the Worlds. Table of Contents: The Time Machine. The War of The Worlds. The Island of Doctor Moreau.

1978, Hardcover with dust jacket, 860 pages

Complete Science Fiction Treasury of H. G. Wells epub download

ISBN13: 978-0517261880

ISBN: 051726188X

Author: H. G. Wells,Herbert George Wells

Category: No category

Language: English

Publisher: Random House Value Publishing (June 24, 1987)

Pages: 860 pages

ePUB size: 1986 kb

FB2 size: 1276 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 157

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Kann
The stories of H. G. Wells are mind-bending when you realize he was writing science fiction, which has now become science. Amazing stories. Amazing man!
Kann
The stories of H. G. Wells are mind-bending when you realize he was writing science fiction, which has now become science. Amazing stories. Amazing man!
Taun
Thanks. Keep up the good work. I have to write 10 more words so I can give you five stars!
Taun
Thanks. Keep up the good work. I have to write 10 more words so I can give you five stars!
Thorgaginn
By some measures, H.G. Wells is not a great writer. Certainly, his characters are for the most part, shallow and - outside of a particular few - rather unmemorable and his plots are often of secondary consideration. At times, he could be preachy. He was less interested in good storytelling than in ideas. But what makes Wells stand out is less his writing style than what he wrote; he is, in a way the Father of Science Fiction. Sure, there were others who wrote science fiction before him, but I feel he was the man who really made it a distinct genre.

This omnibus edition contains Wells's greatest novels along with a couple of others that are of lesser significance but are still definitely science fiction. First off is The Time Machine, probably his most famous novel. An unnamed inventor develops a time machine and relates to his friends about his trip to the future. Most of his visit is spend several hundred thousand years from now, when mankind has divided into two distinct races: the gentle but frail and ignorant Eloi and the savage but clever Morlocks.

Evolution also plays a part in The Island of Dr. Moreau, wherein the title character tries to force it upon various animals, trying to make humans out of beasts. This touches on one of the most prevalent of all science fiction themes, namely that when scientists try to play God, bad things usually happen (or put another way, there are some things that man is not meant to know). At least Frankenstein had lofty goals; Moreau merely does his often sadistic acts to gain greater knowledge for its own sake.

Griffin, the title character in The Invisible Man, also goes too far in his pursuit of knowledge, but at least he is his own victim. Invisibility, he quickly learns, has its fair share of inconveniences, and, in addition, he begins to develop a sense of megalomania. This novel has more than its fair share of humor.

War of the Worlds, however, is more serious. An early alien invasion story, it is also Wells's condemnation of imperialism, with the British on the wrong end of a conquest. The ending of this story is well-known but if you're unfamiliar with it, I won't spoil it; suffice it to say, it was one of the great, ironic conclusions in literature.

The First Men in the Moon is another satire, this one having two characters using a special gravity-repellent material to devise a spaceship that takes them to the Moon. There, they find things much more habitable than science would later show, complete with atmosphere and an intelligent race called Selenites. The Selenites live underground in vast caverns, so the humans are indeed the first men IN the Moon, not merely ON it.

The last two novels are less well-known. Food of the Gods is passably good satire about a substance that causes animals and plants to grow to incredible sizes. Once again, scientists play God with disastrous results, as the Food of the Gods spreads beyond all control. Giant rats and wasps are bad enough, but eventually giant children (the Food only affects immature life) grow into giant adults, threatening their smaller but far more numerous fellow people. In the Days of the Comet is the weakest in the set, a story about a comet that imbues Earth in a strange green mist that removes violent impulses and creates a Socialist paradise; it is Wells at his preachiest and many may disagree with the supposed perfection of his utopia. Ironically, the narrator in this story is one of Wells's most well-developed characters, a young man who is driven by jealousy into an almost murderous rage.

It is hard to judge these novels strictly by today's standards, just as it isn't fair to be critical of old movies if their special effects are inferior to those of the present. Certainly, the style of these stories is a bit dry and slow-moving to a modern reader. Nonetheless, these novels have a value beyond mere literary quality; for a fan of science fiction, this is well worth the read as it provided the foundation for much of the sci-fi out there today.
Thorgaginn
By some measures, H.G. Wells is not a great writer. Certainly, his characters are for the most part, shallow and - outside of a particular few - rather unmemorable and his plots are often of secondary consideration. At times, he could be preachy. He was less interested in good storytelling than in ideas. But what makes Wells stand out is less his writing style than what he wrote; he is, in a way the Father of Science Fiction. Sure, there were others who wrote science fiction before him, but I feel he was the man who really made it a distinct genre.

This omnibus edition contains Wells's greatest novels along with a couple of others that are of lesser significance but are still definitely science fiction. First off is The Time Machine, probably his most famous novel. An unnamed inventor develops a time machine and relates to his friends about his trip to the future. Most of his visit is spend several hundred thousand years from now, when mankind has divided into two distinct races: the gentle but frail and ignorant Eloi and the savage but clever Morlocks.

Evolution also plays a part in The Island of Dr. Moreau, wherein the title character tries to force it upon various animals, trying to make humans out of beasts. This touches on one of the most prevalent of all science fiction themes, namely that when scientists try to play God, bad things usually happen (or put another way, there are some things that man is not meant to know). At least Frankenstein had lofty goals; Moreau merely does his often sadistic acts to gain greater knowledge for its own sake.

Griffin, the title character in The Invisible Man, also goes too far in his pursuit of knowledge, but at least he is his own victim. Invisibility, he quickly learns, has its fair share of inconveniences, and, in addition, he begins to develop a sense of megalomania. This novel has more than its fair share of humor.

War of the Worlds, however, is more serious. An early alien invasion story, it is also Wells's condemnation of imperialism, with the British on the wrong end of a conquest. The ending of this story is well-known but if you're unfamiliar with it, I won't spoil it; suffice it to say, it was one of the great, ironic conclusions in literature.

The First Men in the Moon is another satire, this one having two characters using a special gravity-repellent material to devise a spaceship that takes them to the Moon. There, they find things much more habitable than science would later show, complete with atmosphere and an intelligent race called Selenites. The Selenites live underground in vast caverns, so the humans are indeed the first men IN the Moon, not merely ON it.

The last two novels are less well-known. Food of the Gods is passably good satire about a substance that causes animals and plants to grow to incredible sizes. Once again, scientists play God with disastrous results, as the Food of the Gods spreads beyond all control. Giant rats and wasps are bad enough, but eventually giant children (the Food only affects immature life) grow into giant adults, threatening their smaller but far more numerous fellow people. In the Days of the Comet is the weakest in the set, a story about a comet that imbues Earth in a strange green mist that removes violent impulses and creates a Socialist paradise; it is Wells at his preachiest and many may disagree with the supposed perfection of his utopia. Ironically, the narrator in this story is one of Wells's most well-developed characters, a young man who is driven by jealousy into an almost murderous rage.

It is hard to judge these novels strictly by today's standards, just as it isn't fair to be critical of old movies if their special effects are inferior to those of the present. Certainly, the style of these stories is a bit dry and slow-moving to a modern reader. Nonetheless, these novels have a value beyond mere literary quality; for a fan of science fiction, this is well worth the read as it provided the foundation for much of the sci-fi out there today.
Whitecaster
While this is by no means a complete collection of Wells' science fiction, it does consist of his most famous seven novels: The Time Machine, The Island of Dr. Moreau, The Invisible Man, The War of the Worlds, The First Men in the Moon, The Food of the Gods, and In the Days of the Comet. Bonus features include a short preface written by the author and several original illustrations from each book's initial publication. The typeface is a little unusual in that the text is presented in two columns per page, but this format does hark back to the old style of book and magazine publication. The novels are arranged in chronological order, but Wells suggests in his preface that those not yet familiar with any of his work may be better served by first reading The Invisible Man or War of the Worlds. While I have reviewed the novels included here individually, I thought it important to at least make clear exactly what this collection consists of. If you can find this book it is an excellent buy, particularly so for those just discovering H.G. Wells.
Whitecaster
While this is by no means a complete collection of Wells' science fiction, it does consist of his most famous seven novels: The Time Machine, The Island of Dr. Moreau, The Invisible Man, The War of the Worlds, The First Men in the Moon, The Food of the Gods, and In the Days of the Comet. Bonus features include a short preface written by the author and several original illustrations from each book's initial publication. The typeface is a little unusual in that the text is presented in two columns per page, but this format does hark back to the old style of book and magazine publication. The novels are arranged in chronological order, but Wells suggests in his preface that those not yet familiar with any of his work may be better served by first reading The Invisible Man or War of the Worlds. While I have reviewed the novels included here individually, I thought it important to at least make clear exactly what this collection consists of. If you can find this book it is an excellent buy, particularly so for those just discovering H.G. Wells.
Zeli
I was very fortunate to find this book at a local Goodwill store. The book is a hardback and in excellent condition. While I was a young boy I remember seeing the movie starring Claude Rains in Thr Invisible Man and shortly thereafter set out to read the book. There are not any filler stories attached to this volume as some books are. Every story stands on its own and are very good. This is a great volume for lovers of Wells and also for those wanting to familiarize themselves with the authors work.
Zeli
I was very fortunate to find this book at a local Goodwill store. The book is a hardback and in excellent condition. While I was a young boy I remember seeing the movie starring Claude Rains in Thr Invisible Man and shortly thereafter set out to read the book. There are not any filler stories attached to this volume as some books are. Every story stands on its own and are very good. This is a great volume for lovers of Wells and also for those wanting to familiarize themselves with the authors work.