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Trouble with the Tulip epub download

by Frank S. Page


Frank Page, pastor of First Baptist Church in Taylors, SC, has written a short book of 80 pages entitled Trouble With The TULIP in which he expresses his concerns over Calvinism and their rise in the Southern Baptist Convention

Frank Page, pastor of First Baptist Church in Taylors, SC, has written a short book of 80 pages entitled Trouble With The TULIP in which he expresses his concerns over Calvinism and their rise in the Southern Baptist Convention. Many prominent Southern Baptists such as Dr. Al Mohler, president of Southern Baptist Seminary, have expressed a reformation of Baptist theology calling Southern Baptists to embrace five point Calvinism. Dr. Page wants to counter that call with this book in which he writes to defend what he calls "the true teachings of grace

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Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Frank S. Page's books. Frank S. Page’s Followers (11). Page’s books.

Edna Pratt’s funeral was scheduled to start at 10:00 . but before Jo had the nerve to slip into the back of the service, she wanted to know who else was going to be there. ile since being stood up at the altar on Saturday, and she didn’t relish walking into a crowd now where she might become the main topic of conversation and gossip. But she felt that she owed it to Sally and to Edna to be there. Since Edna was older and had belonged to a different church than her own, Jo didn’t think she would know many of the attendees

Frank S. Page (1995). Page (2000). Trouble with the tulip: a closer examination of the five points of Calvinism.

Frank S. Riverstone Group Publishing. Page, with John Perry (2008). The Incredible Shrinking Church. B&H Publishing Group.

ISBN13:9780970611703. Release Date:January 2000. Publisher:Riverstone Group Publishing.

The Trouble with Tulip. Josephine Tulip is definitely a smart chick, a twenty-first century female MacGyver who writes a helpful hints column and solves mysteries in her spare time

The Trouble with Tulip. Josephine Tulip is definitely a smart chick, a twenty-first century female MacGyver who writes a helpful hints column and solves mysteries in her spare time. Her best friend, Danny, is a talented photographer who longs to succeed in his caree. erhaps a cover photo on National Geographic? When Jo's next-door neighbor is accused of murder, Jo realizes the police have the wrong suspect. As she and Danny analyze clues, follow up on leads, and fall in and out of trouble, she recovers from a broken heart and he discovers that he has feelings for her.

Find nearly any book by Frank S. Page. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Founded in 1997, BookFinder. Learn More at LibraryThing. Page at LibraryThing.

The Trouble With Monkeys. Hey guys! I wore my Trouble with Monkeys shirt out today and within. Page (2008). The Nehemiah Factor: 16 Characteristics of a Missional Leader. Page (2000, 2006). Page (2013). Melissa: A Father's Lessons from a Daughter's Suicide.

To say that the body of Christ is divided on many issues is perhaps the greatest understatement of the age. In fact, to use language that we all understand these days, the family of faith is separated because of seemingly irreconcilable differences. Some would say that a divorce has already occurred due to multiple issues. While the issues involved are too many to mention, they revolve not only around worship styles, practices and choices, but around more weighty areas of theology and belief...

Trouble with the Tulip epub download

ISBN13: 978-0970611703

ISBN: 0970611706

Author: Frank S. Page

Category: No category

Language: English

Publisher: Riverstone Group Publishing; 2nd edition (2000)

Pages: 76 pages

ePUB size: 1736 kb

FB2 size: 1631 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 984

Other Formats: lrf lit doc lrf

Related to Trouble with the Tulip ePub books

Dont_Wory
Dr. Page does a very thorough and - in my not so humble opinion - balanced job of helping us to see the prime differences between Calvinism and "not-Calvinism" (which sometimes is called Arminianism). Many of my fellow Southern Baptists have not taken the time to understand what Reformed Theology and/or Calvinism is all about and they chalk it up to "stuff the Presbyterians down the street believe." However, with a resurgence of Reformed Theology becoming more and more prevalent in our seminaries and pulpits, every believer should know where they stand on this doctrine.

As a former Mississippi political friend of mine would say, Dr. Page has put the hay on the barn floor so we can all eat it.
Dont_Wory
Dr. Page does a very thorough and - in my not so humble opinion - balanced job of helping us to see the prime differences between Calvinism and "not-Calvinism" (which sometimes is called Arminianism). Many of my fellow Southern Baptists have not taken the time to understand what Reformed Theology and/or Calvinism is all about and they chalk it up to "stuff the Presbyterians down the street believe." However, with a resurgence of Reformed Theology becoming more and more prevalent in our seminaries and pulpits, every believer should know where they stand on this doctrine.

As a former Mississippi political friend of mine would say, Dr. Page has put the hay on the barn floor so we can all eat it.
Samulkree
An excellent overview of Calvinism and with some insight into Arminianism. Recommended for anyone struggling to understand the difference or just get a basic grasp.
Samulkree
An excellent overview of Calvinism and with some insight into Arminianism. Recommended for anyone struggling to understand the difference or just get a basic grasp.
Cheber
This is a great book! It is too bad that it is not in greater circulation to be read by more people. People need to know the fallacies of the doctrine of the Tulip.
Cheber
This is a great book! It is too bad that it is not in greater circulation to be read by more people. People need to know the fallacies of the doctrine of the Tulip.
Lbe
Dr. Frank Page, pastor of First Baptist Church in Taylors, SC, has written a short book of 80 pages entitled Trouble With The TULIP in which he expresses his concerns over Calvinism and their rise in the Southern Baptist Convention. Many prominent Southern Baptists such as Dr. Al Mohler, president of Southern Baptist Seminary, have expressed a reformation of Baptist theology calling Southern Baptists to embrace five point Calvinism. Dr. Page wants to counter that call with this book in which he writes to defend what he calls "the true teachings of grace."

Overall the book is more of primer on the Arminian/Calvinist debate. One reviewer at Amazon gave the book a poor rating saying that Dr. Page misunderstands Calvinism but I thought he did a good job of presenting the five points of Calvinism (commonly expressed through the acronym TULIP) in a limited number of pages while trying to be corrective without being negative toward Calvinists he knew would be reading his book. Granted the book does not dive too deeply into either the history nor the exegesis of Calvinism but Dr. Page covers the basics quickly and I believe accurately.

Like many Southern Baptist preachers, Dr. Page does not want to be identified as an Arminian and so he seeks in the book to distance himself from either label. He writes that he simply wants to be a Christian. I think both Calvinists and Arminians would agree with that. Our first and foremost desire should be to be Jesus' disciples and not the teachers of men (1 Corinthians 1:10-12; 3:5). Our first love should be Jesus Christ and not the theology of Arminius or Calvin (Revelation 2:4).

In order for Dr. Page to distance himself from Arminians he seeks to build his own acronym using the word "Grace" which he calls "Five Points of Scriptural Soteriology." Here are his points:

G - Given Through Christ
R - Rejected Through Rebellion
A - Accepted Through Faith
C - Christ Died For All
E - Everlasting Life = Security of the Believer

However, if you examine Page's five points you will find that he is a 4 point Arminian. For example, taking the TULIP and comparing it to Arminianism you will find that Armimians essentially believe:

Total Depravity
Conditional Election
Unlimited Atonement
Resistible Grace
Necessary Perseverance of the Saints

Page, in his book, affirms all but the last point to which he holds to "once saved, always saved" which most Arminians reject as we see the Bible as teaching that true disciples of Jesus must persevere in faith in Jesus and that our salvation is found only in Christ alone (Galatians 5:1-4; Philippians 2:12-15; Colossians 1:21-23; Hebrews 2:1-4; 3:6-19; 4:1-16; 5:8-9; 6:4-20; 10:19-39; 2 Peter 2:20-22; 3:17; 1 John 2:3-6; 3:6-9; 2 John 9; etc.).

In fact, I believe the greatest weakness of Page's book is not that he misunderstands Calvinism but that he misunderstands reformation Arminianism. For instance, Dr. Page claims on page 26 that the heart of Arminians disagreement with Calvinism is over free will. This is simply not true. The core issue for Arminians is the nature and character of God. We believe that our theology flows from viewing God as a loving God first (Romans 5:8; 1 John 4:10). We believe that it was the love of God that motivated Him to send His Son (John 3:16). We believe it was the love of God that created human beings in His image with a free will. We believe so strongly in the love of God that we believe that Jesus came to die for all (1 Timothy 2:1-6; 2 Peter 3:9) for God does not delight in the death of the wicked (Ezekiel 18:23) but He wants all people to repent (Acts 17:30-31). Dr. Page is wrong in his assertion that Arminianism begins with free will. Arminianism begins with the love of God for the world.

Overall this is a worthy book to read. It is a bit pricey for such a small book but I believe Arminians should keep this book in your library. Again, it is a decent primer for those wanting to know more about the Arminian/Calvinist debate. While it does not add much to the debate and is not a theological study of the debate, it is an easy read.
Lbe
Dr. Frank Page, pastor of First Baptist Church in Taylors, SC, has written a short book of 80 pages entitled Trouble With The TULIP in which he expresses his concerns over Calvinism and their rise in the Southern Baptist Convention. Many prominent Southern Baptists such as Dr. Al Mohler, president of Southern Baptist Seminary, have expressed a reformation of Baptist theology calling Southern Baptists to embrace five point Calvinism. Dr. Page wants to counter that call with this book in which he writes to defend what he calls "the true teachings of grace."

Overall the book is more of primer on the Arminian/Calvinist debate. One reviewer at Amazon gave the book a poor rating saying that Dr. Page misunderstands Calvinism but I thought he did a good job of presenting the five points of Calvinism (commonly expressed through the acronym TULIP) in a limited number of pages while trying to be corrective without being negative toward Calvinists he knew would be reading his book. Granted the book does not dive too deeply into either the history nor the exegesis of Calvinism but Dr. Page covers the basics quickly and I believe accurately.

Like many Southern Baptist preachers, Dr. Page does not want to be identified as an Arminian and so he seeks in the book to distance himself from either label. He writes that he simply wants to be a Christian. I think both Calvinists and Arminians would agree with that. Our first and foremost desire should be to be Jesus' disciples and not the teachers of men (1 Corinthians 1:10-12; 3:5). Our first love should be Jesus Christ and not the theology of Arminius or Calvin (Revelation 2:4).

In order for Dr. Page to distance himself from Arminians he seeks to build his own acronym using the word "Grace" which he calls "Five Points of Scriptural Soteriology." Here are his points:

G - Given Through Christ
R - Rejected Through Rebellion
A - Accepted Through Faith
C - Christ Died For All
E - Everlasting Life = Security of the Believer

However, if you examine Page's five points you will find that he is a 4 point Arminian. For example, taking the TULIP and comparing it to Arminianism you will find that Armimians essentially believe:

Total Depravity
Conditional Election
Unlimited Atonement
Resistible Grace
Necessary Perseverance of the Saints

Page, in his book, affirms all but the last point to which he holds to "once saved, always saved" which most Arminians reject as we see the Bible as teaching that true disciples of Jesus must persevere in faith in Jesus and that our salvation is found only in Christ alone (Galatians 5:1-4; Philippians 2:12-15; Colossians 1:21-23; Hebrews 2:1-4; 3:6-19; 4:1-16; 5:8-9; 6:4-20; 10:19-39; 2 Peter 2:20-22; 3:17; 1 John 2:3-6; 3:6-9; 2 John 9; etc.).

In fact, I believe the greatest weakness of Page's book is not that he misunderstands Calvinism but that he misunderstands reformation Arminianism. For instance, Dr. Page claims on page 26 that the heart of Arminians disagreement with Calvinism is over free will. This is simply not true. The core issue for Arminians is the nature and character of God. We believe that our theology flows from viewing God as a loving God first (Romans 5:8; 1 John 4:10). We believe that it was the love of God that motivated Him to send His Son (John 3:16). We believe it was the love of God that created human beings in His image with a free will. We believe so strongly in the love of God that we believe that Jesus came to die for all (1 Timothy 2:1-6; 2 Peter 3:9) for God does not delight in the death of the wicked (Ezekiel 18:23) but He wants all people to repent (Acts 17:30-31). Dr. Page is wrong in his assertion that Arminianism begins with free will. Arminianism begins with the love of God for the world.

Overall this is a worthy book to read. It is a bit pricey for such a small book but I believe Arminians should keep this book in your library. Again, it is a decent primer for those wanting to know more about the Arminian/Calvinist debate. While it does not add much to the debate and is not a theological study of the debate, it is an easy read.
Walianirv
Dr. Frank Page does a wonderful job in The Trouble With the Tulip laying out five points in an easy to understand, easy to read fashion. The book truly helped me, a simple follower of Christ, to understand the Calvinistic, and non-Calvinistic views of Christianity. An excellent read!
Walianirv
Dr. Frank Page does a wonderful job in The Trouble With the Tulip laying out five points in an easy to understand, easy to read fashion. The book truly helped me, a simple follower of Christ, to understand the Calvinistic, and non-Calvinistic views of Christianity. An excellent read!
Sharpbringer
Dr. Page's book speaks truth into the matter of why a group of young men who responded to a student of John Calvin, Jacob Arminius, who wrote his five points of belief on salvation, eternal security, grace, God's atonement. Dr. Page has given us a starting point to begin to grasp the misunderstanding of God's grace, eternal security, salvation and God's atonement.
Sharpbringer
Dr. Page's book speaks truth into the matter of why a group of young men who responded to a student of John Calvin, Jacob Arminius, who wrote his five points of belief on salvation, eternal security, grace, God's atonement. Dr. Page has given us a starting point to begin to grasp the misunderstanding of God's grace, eternal security, salvation and God's atonement.
Usic
Three stars is probably a generous rating for this book. Dr. Page's unscholarly attempt to rebut the five points of Calvinism falls woefully short. The brevity of this book and the lack of adequate research causes it to read more like an undergraduate Theology 101 paper than something produced by a PhD. Granted, Page is a pastor and not a theologian (although he lays claim to being one on the back cover), so his failure to produce an adequate defense for his anti-Calvinist position may be forgiven. I was hoping for a better presentation of the Arminian position, but the author does not consider himself as being in that camp either. Frankly, he appears to have developed a hybrid soteriology founded upon diminished divine sovereignty. Only someone with a preconceived bias toward reformed theology would appreciate this book.
Usic
Three stars is probably a generous rating for this book. Dr. Page's unscholarly attempt to rebut the five points of Calvinism falls woefully short. The brevity of this book and the lack of adequate research causes it to read more like an undergraduate Theology 101 paper than something produced by a PhD. Granted, Page is a pastor and not a theologian (although he lays claim to being one on the back cover), so his failure to produce an adequate defense for his anti-Calvinist position may be forgiven. I was hoping for a better presentation of the Arminian position, but the author does not consider himself as being in that camp either. Frankly, he appears to have developed a hybrid soteriology founded upon diminished divine sovereignty. Only someone with a preconceived bias toward reformed theology would appreciate this book.
Dr. Page succinctly put into words what I have always believed in my heart for as long as I have been a follower of Jesus.
Dr. Page succinctly put into words what I have always believed in my heart for as long as I have been a follower of Jesus.