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Model Behavior: A Novel and 7 Stories epub download

by Jay McInerney


Model behavior - The business - Con doctor - Smoke - Getting in touch with Lonnie - How it ended - The queen and I - Reunion.

Model behavior - The business - Con doctor - Smoke - Getting in touch with Lonnie - How it ended - The queen and I - Reunion. In Model Behavior, Connor McKnight - former acolyte of film, Zen and Japanese literature - is not unaware that these avocations are wildly remote from his present occupation (fledgling celebrity journalist). Moreover, his longtime girlfriend, the fashion model Philomena, suddenly seems curiously remote herself - and soon enough appears to have decamped, avec diaphragm, for the other coast.

His novels include Bright Lights, Big City, Ransom, Story of My Life, Brightness Falls, and The Last of the Savages.

Together with seven stories that "remind one o. .The careful observation of that downward spiral brightened by McInerney's facility with the bon mot and his fondness for skewering the pretensions of the nouveau hi. - -The Miami Herald.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Model Behavior: A Novel and Stories as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Manufacturer: Alfred A. Knopf Release date: 22 September 1998 ISBN-10 : 0679428461 ISBN-13: 9780679428466. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

Items related to Model Behavior: A Novel and 7 Stories. Jay Mcinerney Model Behavior: A Novel and 7 Stories. ISBN 13: 9780375706448. Model Behavior: A Novel and 7 Stories. ISBN 10: 0375706445 ISBN 13: 9780375706448. Publisher: Vintage Books, 1999.

Coauthors & Alternates.

ISBN 9780140119251 (978-0-14-011925-1) Softcover, Vintage Books, 1989. Find signed collectible books: 'Story of My Life'. Coauthors & Alternates.

Jay McInerney is a critically acclaimed author - his first bestselling novel, Bright Lights, Big City (1984) has become a contemporary classic and was followed by nine additional books as well as contributions to numerous literary and popular publications including New York Magazine, Vanity.

and Wall Street Journal.

From the writer whose first novel, Bright Lights, Big City, defined a generation, a collection of twenty-six stories, new and old, that trace the arc of his career for nearly three decades. History & Fiction.

Jay McInerney's first novel since the best-selling The Good Life a sexy, vibrant, cross-generational New York story .

Russell and Corrine Calloway seem to be living the New York dream: book parties one night and high-society charity events the next; jobs they care about (and actually enjoy); twin children, a boy and a girl whose birth was truly miraculous; a loft in TriBeCa and summers in the Hamptons. But all of this comes at a high cost. From the writer whose first novel, Bright Lights, Big City, defined a generation, a collection of twenty-six stories, new and old, that trace the arc of his career for nearly three decades.

Model Behavior: A Novel and 7 Stories epub download

ISBN13: 978-0375706448

ISBN: 0375706445

Author: Jay McInerney

Category: No category

Language: English

Publisher: Vintage Books; First Printing edition (1999)

ePUB size: 1488 kb

FB2 size: 1539 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 558

Other Formats: doc docx mbr mobi

Related to Model Behavior: A Novel and 7 Stories ePub books

Kikora
I finished the book but it was a struggle. One felt no sympathy or empathy with any of the characters and none of them seemed real. Perhaps this was a written version of a cartoon story. All the characters were cardboard cutouts.
Kikora
I finished the book but it was a struggle. One felt no sympathy or empathy with any of the characters and none of them seemed real. Perhaps this was a written version of a cartoon story. All the characters were cardboard cutouts.
Inerrace
love love love
Inerrace
love love love
Ffel
this book was okay. i had to read it when i was trapped in a hostage situation in a bank and so i mean i didn't really identify with the main character because i mean who wants to read about a loser whose girlfriend just left him really? but since i didn't have anything else to do - you feel his pain, it definately brought back some of the teenage heartache feelings which was fun to revisit but otherwise the book was just more of the new york city, postmodernish, rich people who don't have any money, xanax loving embracing their bourgeouis decadent problems but this guy still writes about diaphrams and just for kicks i asked my pseudo-girlgriend if she wanted to use a diaphram and she didn't even know what it was.
Ffel
this book was okay. i had to read it when i was trapped in a hostage situation in a bank and so i mean i didn't really identify with the main character because i mean who wants to read about a loser whose girlfriend just left him really? but since i didn't have anything else to do - you feel his pain, it definately brought back some of the teenage heartache feelings which was fun to revisit but otherwise the book was just more of the new york city, postmodernish, rich people who don't have any money, xanax loving embracing their bourgeouis decadent problems but this guy still writes about diaphrams and just for kicks i asked my pseudo-girlgriend if she wanted to use a diaphram and she didn't even know what it was.
Dyni
One of my favorite books, as of now. Mcinerney brings a literary intellectual spin to minimalism. Bret Ellis with a larger vocabulary, and slightly more poetic.
Dyni
One of my favorite books, as of now. Mcinerney brings a literary intellectual spin to minimalism. Bret Ellis with a larger vocabulary, and slightly more poetic.
Kale
Great book. Read it.
Kale
Great book. Read it.
sergant
It's not easy to create heartbreak, humor, and social criticism all in one take; Jay does.
Uber hip novella about a writer and his model turned actress girlfriend. The most interesting thing about this story is the clever writing. A real treat and worth a cozy read. The story clips along at an energetic hip hop beat. Superb headers and quality comic scenarios abound. The parents really take the cake. The brother and sister relationship is touching and I was especially fond of Brooke. The adventure follows from the very beginning of a most common New York existence of the somewhere in between Upper Crust and trying to hang on to fame with everything you've got to the unraveling and then the attaining of 15 minutes of fame and more through obtuse dramatic exacerbated heartache and sheer folly. Loved it! -- then I made the mistake of expecting more brilliance in the short stories that followed - - not so brilliant. Oh well, they can't all be little rock stars, or in this case supermodels. Concerning the short stories: it was the expectations that killed me. Lower the bar just a bit and the stories are worth a coffee shop read. Reading time: 2 1/2 hours max. Now that's hip, cool and worth it. And you don't come away all teary eyed and contemplative.
sergant
It's not easy to create heartbreak, humor, and social criticism all in one take; Jay does.
Uber hip novella about a writer and his model turned actress girlfriend. The most interesting thing about this story is the clever writing. A real treat and worth a cozy read. The story clips along at an energetic hip hop beat. Superb headers and quality comic scenarios abound. The parents really take the cake. The brother and sister relationship is touching and I was especially fond of Brooke. The adventure follows from the very beginning of a most common New York existence of the somewhere in between Upper Crust and trying to hang on to fame with everything you've got to the unraveling and then the attaining of 15 minutes of fame and more through obtuse dramatic exacerbated heartache and sheer folly. Loved it! -- then I made the mistake of expecting more brilliance in the short stories that followed - - not so brilliant. Oh well, they can't all be little rock stars, or in this case supermodels. Concerning the short stories: it was the expectations that killed me. Lower the bar just a bit and the stories are worth a coffee shop read. Reading time: 2 1/2 hours max. Now that's hip, cool and worth it. And you don't come away all teary eyed and contemplative.
Jorad
Model Behavior covers a lot of the same ground as Bright Lights, Big City. There's a depressed guy (he's a little older than the main character of BLBC, probably because McInerney is too), he's got a model girlfriend that is leaving him, he's a low ranking writer for a magazine, with aspirations of being a screenwriter. Does this sound familiar to anyone? It's basically a rewrite with different names. Also, the character lived in Japan for a few years, much like Chris Ransom in McInerney's Ransom. The Japanese culture is referenced frequently, as if to prove that McInerney knows about another culture. This story doesn't feel like McInerney is trying very hard, and it shows in the way the story drags and occasionally seems to repeat itself. There are some good social observations, but at times McInerney takes those too far, mocking himself the writer in a review, but others (like Stephen King) have done that sort of mocking much better.

Overall, it's an interesting story, and there are redeeming qualities that will keep you reading, but by the end it's all fairly pointless.

I'm not going to review the 7 short stories that come after the novel Model Behavior in this book, because all 7 stories appear with 3 others in the book How It Ended. Weird... So, I'll review them there together there.
Jorad
Model Behavior covers a lot of the same ground as Bright Lights, Big City. There's a depressed guy (he's a little older than the main character of BLBC, probably because McInerney is too), he's got a model girlfriend that is leaving him, he's a low ranking writer for a magazine, with aspirations of being a screenwriter. Does this sound familiar to anyone? It's basically a rewrite with different names. Also, the character lived in Japan for a few years, much like Chris Ransom in McInerney's Ransom. The Japanese culture is referenced frequently, as if to prove that McInerney knows about another culture. This story doesn't feel like McInerney is trying very hard, and it shows in the way the story drags and occasionally seems to repeat itself. There are some good social observations, but at times McInerney takes those too far, mocking himself the writer in a review, but others (like Stephen King) have done that sort of mocking much better.

Overall, it's an interesting story, and there are redeeming qualities that will keep you reading, but by the end it's all fairly pointless.

I'm not going to review the 7 short stories that come after the novel Model Behavior in this book, because all 7 stories appear with 3 others in the book How It Ended. Weird... So, I'll review them there together there.
McInerney's amazing new book, sure, visits familiar terrain: life in the fast lane. But it is textured with a sad knowledge and insight hard won by taking an unflinching look into the gears and products of the fame machine. Along the way, it takes a smart look at types we see every day and, instead of sterotyping them, lays painfully plain the exact shapes of the crosses they bear.It would be tempting to pass judgment on glossy types -- as many snipey reviewers love to do with McInerney himself. But McInerney deftly sidesteps any treatment of personas we've seen and sensitively observes celebrities as (gasp) people. His indictment of them and the id-gratifying world they (and we) inhabit is rendered with grace. No trendy irony here, no fake modesty, no gratuitous heroics. It all rings uncomfortably true, no matter whether it's about bold-face names or my next-door neighbors. McInerney is not afraid to call a spade a spade, even when it means making his own reviews a punchline. This is brilliant fiction. And I don't recall anyone saying you could only write about New York once in your career. This is an honest and beautifully funny book. I can't wait to read all of it, including the deft short stories, again.
McInerney's amazing new book, sure, visits familiar terrain: life in the fast lane. But it is textured with a sad knowledge and insight hard won by taking an unflinching look into the gears and products of the fame machine. Along the way, it takes a smart look at types we see every day and, instead of sterotyping them, lays painfully plain the exact shapes of the crosses they bear.It would be tempting to pass judgment on glossy types -- as many snipey reviewers love to do with McInerney himself. But McInerney deftly sidesteps any treatment of personas we've seen and sensitively observes celebrities as (gasp) people. His indictment of them and the id-gratifying world they (and we) inhabit is rendered with grace. No trendy irony here, no fake modesty, no gratuitous heroics. It all rings uncomfortably true, no matter whether it's about bold-face names or my next-door neighbors. McInerney is not afraid to call a spade a spade, even when it means making his own reviews a punchline. This is brilliant fiction. And I don't recall anyone saying you could only write about New York once in your career. This is an honest and beautifully funny book. I can't wait to read all of it, including the deft short stories, again.